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Unidentified Young Women In Dresses In Front Of American Flag

The Civil War period profoundly affected women’s position in society and provided many opportunities for women to change their own lives

During the war, many Southern men traveled farther away from home than they had ever imagined. Far from their families and their communities, they were often alone, sick and wounded. Under these circumstances, women were called upon to nurse men who were not a part of their immediate or extended families.

In this way, the women of the South formed a network, caring for each other’s men when far from home, knowing that some day another women may have to care for their men. In this December, 1864 letter from J. C. Preston of Lewisburg, to Eliza Carrington of Charlottesville, Mrs. Preston thanks her for crossing enemy lines to nurse her wounded son, Walter. She writes to express “unfeigned thanks for your noble mission through the lines & my high appreciation of the benevolence & goodness of heart which prompted it.”

  • Gift; Tom Liljenquist, Purchased from: Home Sweet Homes Antiques, Anacortes, Washington, 2005.
  • Exhibited: “The Last Full Measure : Civil War Photographs from the Liljenquist Family Collection” at the Library of Congress, Washington, D.C., 2011.
  • Letter and info http://explore.lib.virginia.edu/exhibits/show/hearts/griefs

Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

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Envelope showing Confederate flag, addressed to Miss Lou Taylor, No. 461 Sixth St., Cincinnati, Ohio

In the Confederacy, paper had become scarce during the war, which prompted Southerners to turn to reusing wallpaper and book pages to create envelopes, as well as turn envelopes inside out to reuse them.

Publication of Civil War envelopes began as early as the mid-1850’s, when north-south divisions began to take shape, but ended prior to the war’s conclusion because most believed that it was too indulgent and expensive to continue production in a time of war. These Civil War envelopes, some of which have been called early versions of pictorial postcards, were very popular with collectors of patriotic propaganda. 

http://www.americanantiquarian.org/cwenvelopes.htm

Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C. 20540 USA http://hdl.loc.gov/loc.pnp/pp.print

Sabria Clack With Cased Photograph Of Her Husband, Private W.R. Clack, Of Co. B, 43rd Tennessee Infantry Regiment

The 43rd Tennessee At Vicksburg: Voices From The Civil War-

  •  Issac Stamper recorded: “Some of our boys bought some small cakes made of cornbread at four and five dollars a cake. This was almost starvation but all were willing to hold on as long as there was any hopes of relief rather than submit to Yankee tyranny.” The regiment endured the siege of 47 days at Vicksburg prior to their surrender on July 4, 1863 recording 620 men who signed their paroles five days later.
  • One soldier noted: “We were sorry we had to bow to our oppressors but thankful that we were alive. We are proud to know that we had held a terrible foe 48 days on twelve days rations.”
  • During this six month Vicksburg campaign, they left 68 men dead, 22 known to have been from enemy action. A considerable number of men during this period died from typhoid fever, measles, smallpox, diarrhea, dysentery and various other aliments.

Gift; Tom Liljenquist, Purchased from: The Historical Shop, Metairie, La., 2012, Forms part of: Liljenquist Family Collection of Civil War Photographs (Library of Congress)

http://www.43dtenn.com/ShortHistory.html