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can this be my house? 

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As a little background, I grew up hitting rails in Ohio because when it snowed, the park was too slow and flat to ski.  Since I’ve moved to Utah I haven’t had much luck hitting urban between getting busted and injuries.  

Over the past few seasons, I’ve watched street skiing take such a fresh and unique path apart from its roots.  Sometimes one might find themselves rewinding a clip over and over again in an attempt to comprehend what had just went down.  The present is witnessing such diverse styles being channeled on some heavily weighted features.

A few buddies caught my interest when they showed me footage of a decently sized bridge that required a blind pop over a chest high wall, followed by a sizable plummet into tranny down below.  After seeing an incredibly stylish shot of my buddy john tweaking out a safety high above the wall, I had to give it a try.  Above are a few screenshots from the day, it feels good to get my feet wet again.  

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The new facility looks sick! Time to get snow ready.

Snogression SloMoSnogression indoor ski and snowboard training facility in Salt Lake City, Utah. Shot by Trevor Mcdonald and Tom Garner. Athletes: Mitchell Brower, Kevin Brower, Giray Didali, Ross Imburgia, Hailee Mattingly, Tyler Watson, Sam Hurst, Rob Aseltine, Justin Aday

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Days that in not hurting I like to send it! Supertramp for super tricks! Getting down at #snogression #sochi #2014 #training @snogression

February Update part.1

So remember in that last post, something along of the lines of “expect copious amounts of content.”?? Well, there’s no doubt a lot of skiing has been happening, I’ve just been lazy about writing it up and getting it on this page.  Between skiing, studying for exams, and chasing around photos and footage, sometimes I get a bit sidetracked or take the easy way out and do a quick upload to facebook without the thoughts and writing that should accompany it.  Without further to do, this post should be a great recap of what I have been up to.

The last update came right around New Years from a great outing of hitting hand rails and spending hours lapping Park City. The thought of skiing backcountry or slashing soft snow off the cirque at snowbird was non existent.  Sure people were getting after it over there, but hard pack conditions and crusty old pow was not at the top of my list.  Unfortunately, the mountains weren’t getting any more snow, nor was the city.  With snow melting rapidly, we took action to make due of the solid offering of city snow that fell in December.

First up was a pretty well known spot from last year that we thought would be fun to setup it up and give it a go.  Upon arrival at the spot, the amount of snow was not an issue, building a transition out of snow sugary enough to make avalanche forecasters cringe was another.  Upon further observation, we found and made use out of a water spicket that happened to be chilling at the spot.  It had an endless supply of water; it was exactly what we needed.  Matt Sklar was in town and he brought his flashes! Stoked on his work and how this came out.

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Next, was this closeout that has a slight up then flat to about a 15 foot drop.  It’s not the gnarliest rail but certainly the most memorable in my  mind.  Imagine, for the past four years walking by a rail on your way to class every day and dreaming about hitting it.  On the last day of winter break before spring classes went into affect, we made it happen.  Not to mention, it was my first urban closeout ever.  Every scrap of snow in that zone was used and a huge thanks to the fellas pulling the bungee.

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Feeling very satisfied and eager for more, time was spent discussing what spot would be hit next.  It was a tough decision to make as I stated earlier, snow was melting rapidly, and there was none in the forecast.  There had been talk about hitting this large closeout that can be seen in Dylan Thompson’s nation segment, but it was not something I had much ambition for.  Surprisingly, I got a call from the crew one night, I was told it was all setup and ready to go in the morning.  Feeling confident, I made it a priority to go to the spot the following day and get a shot.

An artsy zoom angle of the takeoff makes this look pretty mellow.

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Props to the crew for putting in hours on this thing and building it very sturdy.  This fisheye shot by Twoods sort of distorts the true shape of the feature but replicates the feeling and vibes this beast put out very accurately.

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The day started out contrary to plan.  Speed was tested, hopes were high, the session was about to be under way.  Unfortunately Foster’s first hit left him with a shattered eye socket thank to a brutal collision with his knee.  A bit shook, I decided I’d give it a go.  Ignoring suggestions of the more intelligent, I opted to decline tying the bungee further back and sending it anyways.  As predicted, my speed was short, and I free fell from the top of the railing to my side in the flats.  It felt as if all the air had been taken out of my lungs and I’d been blind sided by a semi.  Realizing my heel piece

had ripped out I figured my day was done.

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(dirtnapping or crying?)

Brian Tonetti, like a G, stepped up, got the speed dialed, and started taking hits. After the smoothness of his first couple hits, I had it made up in my mind that Brian was about to lace it up and nail the shot. 

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Closeout rails get there name for a very observable reason.  There is another rail connected perpendicular to the one you are sliding, thus, it “closes out”.  Hitting these adds a bit of a scare factor to the rail as it makes you think about the consequences of catching your tips or tails on the restricting piece.  Unfortunately for Brian, in the midst of stomping out this rail, the observation deck that stands the highest on this structure, brushed up against his shoulder en route to the rail setting his balance off by the slightest bit.  On a quick and high speed feature such as this, split seconds are the allotted time frame for making adjustments, and executing moves when they are needed.  The slight unexpected obstruction forced Tonetti into an awkward position.  Against everyone’s hopes, at the last second, his tip caught on the closeout sending him plummeting down to the flats, inevitably ending his day.  Seriously shook, Brian opted to take a step back and resign from the rail.  High hopes were held and his health maintained.

Feeling hungry I went back up on borrowed skis (thank you PMOORE!) that I aided in the pulling out of another heel piece on my second hit.  Emotions were swirling.

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Ian (the kid) nodding in disapproval.  He claimed to have felt very let down by the sub par performance of the hood crew that day.  ”How do they call themselves pelicans when they can’t even fly?”

Pissed and hurt, yet still dumb enough to keep hitting this feature, I grabbed my one ski that was still useable and pat’s non broken ski. Thankfully, a few hits later, the spot was nailed and it was time to leave.

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This is a still frame that Jeff Scott captured of me on a successful attempt.  While the shifty on adds style, it was absolutely necessary if you didn’t want to get clipped on the way up by the standing deck that protruded out all too intimidatingly.

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With no hopes of snow insight, it was time to nurse up a banged up body and cruise park laps at PC

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flat 3 blunt photo: mountain ranks

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Nollie disaster

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Pretz

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sw7 blunt

With shifting weather patterns, snow started falling in the mountains but because of temperatures, the snow has neglected the city only offering rain down here.  That’s OKAY though.  Snowbird is now sitting on a healthy 92” base with more snow in the forecast.  Keep your eyes peeled for part 2 coming shortly.

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My new place of employment. Too sick, come in and say hi.

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Best edit out. No Doubt. 

February Update Part 2

It’s 7:35 on this Monday morning as I walk into my most attention-grabbing class, Accounting Information Systems….Don’t get me wrong, I feel extremely privileged to attend such a great program and school, but this class doesn’t quite offer the rush or excitement that some of my more preferred activities do.  A 6:30 alarm set for a school day just isn’t the same as its equivalent on a day in the mountains.

After about 15minutes, I finally come to the realization that I’ve unconsciously been hacking away at dry skin on the tip of my nose.  To anyone glancing at me in class, it probably looks like I’m on an endless bender trying to clear my nasal cavity of every long lost booger.  While my nose is now a bit sensitive to touch and probably glowing red with unweathered skin, it represents something significant.  It’s’ amazing how a fully functioning mind has the capacity to store and readily be able to replay events we decide to reminisce upon.  The significance revolving around the erosion of my nose are the events that I’ve participated in that have contributed to it’s weakening..endless amounts of faceshots and cold snow plastered to my face, strong blustery gusts whipping one around on the highest ridges, and the warm sun beating down on my face after long days of shredding.

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Here’s a little throwback of myself and friend Jeremy Lato making our first trip to the top of Mt Superior

As a refresher, last week’s post gave insight to sunny park laps and sketchy closeout rails in the streets.  Unfortunately, we haven’t seen ANY significant snow accumulation in the city, or enough to get stoked on urban for that matter.  On the upside, patterns switched and the mountains have been receiving much love from the snow gods.  For 2 weeks starting January 14th we didn’t receive a trace of snow.  Including the 13 inches we saw January 30th, we’ve received almost 8 feet of snow in the last month, you can imagine that the skiing has been good!

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Slingshottin through the trees on a fun drop

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360 in mineral, jeff rowe with the filming

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Bo Torrey and I cruisin into Poop chute just as thunder and lighting struck

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360 Pov in mineral

I’ve never really had the luxury of being able to consistently link up with a photographer at a resort.  If I have it’s been by luck, thus me posting mainly POV content which I definitely don’t mind doing.  This year I’ve had the fortune of meeting John Lykins.  John is a local Snowbird skier who shreds super hard and takes great photos.  John always has a camera on deck so he’s always ready to line up the shot.  The next couple are some of our recent work together.

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Snowbird has been super fun and very soft lately so venturing into the backcountry hasn’t really been on the forefront of my mind.  Not to forget, we received a storm mid February that provided significant water weight to our snowpack yielding an extremely high avalanche danger. After close observation to the Utah Avalanche forecast and having numerous in-depth conversations, we decided with the right aspect and careful skepticism we could ski something cool safely.  We decided on a more westerly face since it hadn’t been receiving the loading that N and E aspects were and it proved to be an excellent choice! Grey Wilde, Jeff Rowe, and myself stood at the bottom of a classic 1500’ Wasatch gem slapping high fives, hootin and hollerin, as we just nailed this thing in the best conditions we have ever skied it.  It was Jeff’s first time and I’m sure not his last!  The snow was light enough to get in your face with a quick snap of the skis yet solid enough to grip an edge and open it up. Normally I enjoy tasting a bit of snow on the way down and making some quick hockey style slashes but this time I just wanted to ski it super fast and as smooth as possible.  I definitely do not regret it.

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Grey and I have been roommates since the dorms.  We both moved to Utah from Ohio in pursuit of skiing awesome lines.  5 years later we’re still making it happen.  The stoke is high after a great, untouched descent into Cardiff Fork.  Linking up to plan out days like this are easy when all you have to do is walk upstairs to discuss what will be the best route for the day.



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The following day I got to link up with a great crew to go do more walking around the backcountry. Myself, Ware, and Karl skinning and Tanaka behind the lens.

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Following John Ware into the choke as Karl Fost and Luke Tanaka anxiously wait to drop.

After topping out on Toledo Bowl I convinced the crew that we should ski the same line as I did yesterday..Everyone was stoked on the idea as Luke and John hadn’t dropped this line before.  These fellas had just spent a month of skiing bottomless pow in Japan, I think this run kept them pretty stoked on Utah.  Fresh snow and some wind buffing regenerated this guy from the day before.  

Predictions of future snow sound favorable.  Keep your fingers crossed that we get more powder!  My spring break is in about 2 weeks, may have a trip planned, we will see.

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First day jumping since the summer of 2012. It was mostly mellow. Cam: @nottrever #super8 #snogression

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