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In Photos: “Signares” by Fabrice Monteiro.

Exploring history and fashion along the west coast of Africa, for his series ‘Signares' Belgian-Beninese photographer Fabrice Monteiro recalls a time in history where distinct cultures collided.

As European traders and explorers began to ascend on Africa’s west coast around the 15th and 16th century, as these men where forbidden from bringing their families and wives from their home countries, they began to intermingle and intermarry with African women in the Senegambia region. As a result of these relations, many of these women began to orchestrate business dealings to their benefits “using these partnerships to bolster their socioeconomic standing and personal trading enterprises”. One signare in the 1770s from St Louis, Senegal, is noted to have been a property owner and dealer as she bought and sold property in Saint-Domingue, while “five other signares in Gorée signed a petition against a poorly run French company that had been awarded an exclusive contract with the island”. 

Although these relations were not at first recognized by colonial and European authorities, it later became acceptable for Europeans living in Senegal to marry and have their descendants profit from these unions through heritage rights. Most of these women were considered to be of a high class and often married “middle-class executives or French and English aristocrats”. Naturally, a new sense of fashion was born as the women combined their own traditional styles with European attire at the time.

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All Africa, All the time.

Signares: Women Who Held Their Own in a Man’s World

Written by Laura Turner September 22, 2008

With the conception of two sexes comes the question of hierarchy. Presuming the notion of two separate sexes is correct, the act of labeling one of these sexes as superiority to the other correlates with human’s affinity for categorizing all things into specific relations with and against one another. It is difficult to determine where the idea of male as better than female originates. Many philosophers and social scientists attempt to explain how the dichotomy between the sexes developed. Friedrich Engels’s theory about inequality between men and women from “The Origin of the Family, Private Property, and the State” is appropriate to utilize when discussing the rise of signares: African women who defied tradition by breaking boundaries of the expected role of women. Leith Mullins explains: “From Engels’s perspective, ‘equality’ derives from all the members of society having the same relationship to the resources of society, particularly the means of production. Inequality, in this context, occurs when such resources are appropriated by particular strata as private property.”[i] Engels’s viewpoint about the variation between the sexes is primarily based in economics. According to his theory when women are excluded from social production they are not able to fully participate in society, and therefore do not reap the full benefits that men earn from dominating society’s public realm. Although somewhat limited in scope, Engels’s solution to rectify inequality, is to have women in the workforce earning the same wages as men and therefore be capable of affording private property with out having a dependence on men for monetary assistance.

Mullins furthers Engels’s concept by distinguishing the difference between equality and asymmetry. Mullins’s definition of “asymmetry” takes into account that although access to the means of production might be equal and the distribution of resources may be egalitarian, “a group of males may retain formal control over the distribution; males and females may not have access to the same roles and statuses, and there may be differing cultural evaluations of these roles.” Mullins’s argument of asymmetry is pertinent to the discussion of the evolution of the signares. Although these women start off being as powerful as the European traders who require their aid, as the status of signares changes with time, their expected roles in correspondence also alter. Mullins deems that a good technique to understand what caused the change in women’s status is “to analyze how the status of women has changed as society has become increasingly stratified. Although forms of stratification were developing in Africa before colonialism (and of course many state systems existed), the European intrusion, through slave trade and colonialism, accelerated the division of the population into classes.” This statement reflects Mullins’s conviction that one of the results of colonialism was the deterioration of the status of women in comparison to men. The plummet in importance of women’s status correlates with the colonizer’s introduction of a definite social structure based on discrimination by class and sex. This weakening of women’s status also decreased independent female participation in the public sphere and entrepreneurial settings.

Engels’s supposition that women would have equal opportunity for resources of society and the same means of production was based on the premise of an idealistic non-stratified society. Particularly the emergence of private property was the indication Engels looked to in order to elucidate why men had more power and authority than women over the course of history. Mullins asserts that several anthropologists have hypothesized that “in societies where men and women are engaged in the production of the same kinds of socially necessary goods, and where widespread private property (and therefore class structure) has not developed, women’s participation in production gives them access to and control over the products of their labor, as well as considerable freedom and independence.”  This quotation demonstrates the best-case scenario in the opinion of Engels and Mullins for women to achieve economic equality to men. Indeed it is exactly this type of non-stratified setting from which signares evolved.

Amy Richlin attributes Linda Gordon for outlining two stances towards writing women’s history:  “In one approach, the historian paints women as the victims of an oppressive structure, showing how patriarchy and patriarchs keep women downtrodden. In the other approach, the historian paints women as agents, working out their own strategies to deal with whatever system they find themselves in. This second approach tries… to analyze sets of strategies that women at particular times and places have adopted.” Engels’s position towards equality for women corresponds with this first approach, siding with the idea that patriarchy causes inequality in economics, which in turn debilitates women from functioning to their full potential. Engels would argue that the absence of a fixed patriarchy, and lack of rigid private property laws on the islands of Gorée and Saint-Louis, created a rare ideal historical situation that allowed the rise of signares. Indeed the unique historical aspects that surrounded the development of signares were critical to nurturing their success. However the second approach to writing feminist history would focus on the fact that these women fashioned their ascent into power through their own ingenuity.

The birthplace of the signares was on the islands of Gorée and Saint-Louis. These two islands are located near the mouth of the Senegal River which flows into the Atlantic Ocean. Before the arrival of European traders, these two small islands held little importance for the native peoples. Landing on the islands required careful navigation, neither island had remarkable arable land, and Gorée also barely had any potable water. Therefore the African peoples had no striking reason to desire inhabiting these islands when the mainland was bountiful and plentiful. However with the coming of European merchants these islands served as a prime location to establish a trading center for the transition of goods from West Africa to Europe. The isolation of the islands and lack of settled peoples on them, made Gorée and Saint-Louis relatively easy places for the Europeans to claim as their own property. It also served as a new spot where it was possible for aspiring African women to stake their claim. The Portuguese were the first Europeans to explore mainland Western Africa in depth from around 1556-1587. George E. Brooks acknowledges “Portuguese permitted to live ashore in African communities to expedite trade came to be known as lançados, from the Portuguese se-lançar (“throw oneself”), which may be freely translated as individuals who cast their lot among African societies.” These lançados bartered directly with Africans and respected their customs. Through trade these lançados sometimes joined in unions with African women who acted as precursors to signares by similarly performing as “invaluable interpreters of language, society, and culture and as collaborators in commercial exchanges” for the Portuguese traders. However it was the French who began on a large scale to systematically trade with Africans with the intention of creating considerable revenue. And it was the French who first settled Gorée and Saint-Louis and attracted the attention of many African women. James Searing addresses:

The origins of the signares remain obscure, but it is likely that they were formed by three separate currents of emigration to the islands. Free women traders from the mainland, like those described by La Courbe, expanded their commercial activities by ‘marrying’ Atlantic merchants and establishing themselves as signares. Secondly, it is likely that some of the Afro-Portuguese signares based on the mainland migrated to the islands and reestablished themselves as intermediaries in the Atlantic trade, and that this group gave its name to the signares. Thirdly, European sources suggest that some signares were slave women chosen as mistresses by Atlantic merchants from the female slaves that the slave trade brought to Saint Louis and Gorée.

Catherine Coquery-Vidrovitch is of the conviction that “it is likely that most of these women were former slaves engaging in what was considered (first by Europeans and finally by their compatriots) a means of social advancement.” However, many sources remain distant or completely fail to concentrate on the specific reasons behind why the African women decided to begin partnerships with the French. It is difficult to determine what provoked the women to want to help the Europeans. Most articles and books seem to suggest it was only because of the women’s desire for wealth that spurred creation of signares. Articles never addressed whether the signares chose this life style to help their whole family profit, or if the women anticipated that resisting the influence of the Europeans would make their lives more difficult. Surely some tribes must have rigorously rejected the influence of the Europeans and detested the Africans who helped these foreigners exploit other Africans, but this aspect was not explored in books about signares.

Regardless of their personal reasons to aid Europeans, there is much evidence showing that signares were adept traders who had great entrepreneurial prowess. There are accounts from Europeans of their abilities to profit from the trade economy.

The Abbé Demanet, who accompanied the French expedition dispatched to reoccupy Gorée in 1763, criticized the lack of initiative European traders there and at other trading communities displayed while the women associated with them were becoming wealthy in commerce: ‘Each and every one had become absorbed in his own diversions and was debilitated by indolence. Simple clerks, ordinary employees with low-level appointments, reached expenses of 10,000 francs a year. One sees today on Gorée, at Senegal, and in the Gambia some of their concubines who have fortunes of 100,000 livres, even though prior to this business, so pernicious in different respects, they owned nothing whatever.

Demanet’s critical assessment demonstrates that while the European men dallied away their money (often ironically to court signares with expensive presents), the women have earned fortunes through their determination and adaptability to the new French culture. His use of the term concubine shows his lack of recognition of these women as much more than sexual partners. Even though Demanet acknowledges the wealth these women have garnered he fails to understand their essential importance to the success of the trade networks.

Sieur De La Courbe served as the Company’s director during the late seventeenth century “testified to the important role of women traders at Saint Louis at the end of the seventeenth century. ‘Returning to the fort, I entered into the store where we carried on our trade. There I found several women from Bieurt and other neighboring villages, who had brought hides, millet, pagnes or cotton cloths, because they are the ones who control almost all the trade of Senegal [Saint Louis].” These women utilized their privileged access to African and European networks to exploit the trade system to their advantage. Signares were indispensable to Europeans as interpreters of African language and culture. Aside from acting as very important translators, signares also created business opportunities that favored their own advancement. Searing notes that the signares:

had the advantage of monopolizing certain economic functions that were essential to the economy of the islands. Europeans could buy the millet required to feed their slaves and African hired laborers, but only women’s labor could transform the millet into food, pounding it into various flours used in the preparation of couscous and porridge, and only women were able and willing to provide the domestic services of washing clothes and keeping house for European men and their employees. Women merchants [signares] provided the female slave labor that filled these essential roles and they eventually transformed this domestic economy into a beachhead that allowed them [signares] to become merchant-entrepreneurs who played an essential role in Atlantic commerce.

Signares had the power and ability to influence terms of trading into advantageous deals for themselves. Engels would state that in the past it was the men who decided prices of items and controlled the distribution of them. Here however, signares often bartered directly with the African merchants and determined the value of raw materials that the Europeans would purchase. Also with the case of millet, women were in control of its production into food, making men dependent on their services in order to survive. Mullins would say this is one of the few instances not just of equality but also of “symmetry” where the women’s opinion and control was balanced to that of men. Signares “who had long confronted the vicissitudes of trade, enjoyed a certain autonomy. This was manifest above all in their solidarity and even complicity with the world of men, from which they generally lived apart.” Traders needed the signares to communicate with the African merchants, therefore they respected and valued the signares and worked with them as a partners, rather than a master/slave relationship or man “superior” to woman. Through their economic power the signares were able to change the social game by manipulating the Europeans.

There is much evidence about the success of these women: “signares received double and triple rations and whatever else they desired, and their domestic slaves were fed with meat and millet at the company’s expense.” The company referenced in this quote is the Compagnie des Indes which was commanded by the French and their primary business concerned with African trade. The privileged status of the signares is illustrated through the fact that they “obtained the choicest merchandise, including commodities not available to lower-level French employees.” Another aspect indicating the high status of the signares was that the women often achieved ownership of property through their privileged economic wealth. Engels would be impressed by the statistic that: “by 1749, ten of thirteen private properties on Gorée belonged to Eurafricans, nine of whom were women.” Also Antoine Edmé Pruneau de Pommegorge, a French man noted that the majority of the signares, “live in considerable affluence, and many African women own thirty or forty slaves which they hire to the Compagnie.” The signares were not only owners of homes, they also possessed skilled slaves which they then appointed to work in the Compagnie. These slaves were in high demand by Europeans to be used as sailors of ships going up and down the Senegal River because they were natives of the land, and also these slaves were more likely to be obedient towards the French because of their loyalty to their signare. This became common practice as the signares “used their contacts with Company officials to secure training and employment for their own slaves, thus creating the system of hiring out skilled slaves that dominated the labor market of the islands in the second half of the eighteenth century.” This continued the pattern set up by the signares of Europeans depending on Africans for their trade network to work properly. Another unusual aspect of the signare’s life was that “at Gorée, a signare’s children inherited her wealth, following Lebou practice, which was for the children to inherit from their mother without interference from their father.” This practice ensured that all the wealth the signare accumulated would be translated directly to her children, which can be seen as a motivating factor for the signare to be a successful entrepreneur.

            Besides using their cunning and being very resourceful, signares were also so successful because of their irresistibility. European men were strongly attracted to these women. “‘Signareship’ evolved during the French occupation of Gorée and Saint-Louis, despite the regulations promulgated by the directors of the Compagnie des Indes forbidding employees to engage in private trade or traffic with African women. The company’s directives were flouted by employees of every rank and by soldiers and sailors as well.” These women held such allure that French men could not resist interacting with them. Signares were desirable for their proficiency and knowledge: “it was the older and more experienced signares, possessing large households of skilled domestic slaves and established commercial networks, who were sought as partners by the highest-ranking company employees.” These Frenchmen fully grasped the advantages of uniting with a signare. Besides being valuable for business purposes, the French were also physically attracted to these elegant women. Michel Adanson a French botanist who spent 1749 to 1753 in Senegal to study its flora and fauna, describes his reaction to the women of Saint-Louis “‘Their skin is surprisingly delicate and soft; their mouth and lips are small; and their features are regular. There are some of them perfect beauties.’” Also Reverend John Lindsay a British chaplain praised and appreciated Senegalese women:

As to their women, and in particular the ladies (for so I must call many of those in Senegal) they are in a surprising degree handsome, have very fine features, are wonderfully tractable, remarkably polite both in conversation and manners; and in the point of keeping themselves neat and clean (of which we have generally strange ideas, formed to us by the beastly laziness of slaves), they far surpass the Europeans in every respect. They bathe twice a day… You may, perhaps, smile at all this; but I assure you ‘tis a truth. Negroes to me are no novelty; but the accounts I received of them, and in particular the appearance of the females on this occasion, were to me a novelty most pleasing.”

This quote demonstrates that although Lindsay is surely racist, he still admires these lovely ladies, a testament to their grace and presence. Because of the many benefits of partnering up with a signare, many Europeans informally married them. Antoine Edmé Pruneau de Pommegorge from his book published in 1789 states: “Some of these women are married in church, others a la mode du pays, which in general consists of the consent of both parties and the relatives. It is remarked that the latter marriages are always more successful than the former; the women are more faithful to their husbands than otherwise the case.” A la mode du pays roughly means “in the way of the countryside” and suggests the relative informality of this union. Although the ceremony was not officially carried out in a church, these marriages advantaged both people. Geoffery de Villeneuve, who lived for two years in Gorée summarizes the prevailing practices: “They freely contract a type of limited marriage with Europeans, regarding themselves as legitimate wives, remaining faithful, and giving the father’s name to the children who result from the union. The departure of the white for Europe, with no expectation of returning, breaks the ties of matrimony, and she soon after enters a new contract. The ceremonies observed at the time of this union are the same as those of the Africans’ marriages.’” Therefore the signares used these limited marriages to ensure their children’s future by guaranteeing that they would have a European last name, securing the children from ever being confused for a slave. It also shows the flexability of the signares to adapt to whatever European they decide to form a union with. The man of a signare’s second marriage was liable to welcoming her children from her first marriage.

The signares created their own society on Gorée and Saint-Louis. They forged ahead into new territory for women in the public sphere. But by the end of the eighteenth century “the founding era of the signares was in some sense over, even though French merchants would continue to form temporary marriages with local women, sometimes forming new mulatto families.” Searing’s statement refers to the fact that by the end of the eighteenth century signare’s status as a key player in trade no longer existed. Only for the short period of time between late seventeenth century to mid eighteenth century did these women hold substantive power. By the end of the eighteenth century the French simply used the term signare “ as essentially a description of light-skinned mulatto women, the preferred choice of European men.” This change in the meaning of the world reflects how the roles of signare changed. No longer seen as invaluable translators, signare became a term standing for a pretty mulatto woman, and described the daughters of the first generation of revolutionary sigare. By the end of the eighteenth century “the overall trend was for the consolidation of existing mulatto families, which included the gradual accumulation of property and political power in the hands of men, who acted as political spokesmen and heads of households. The signares of the late eighteenth century lived in a different social context than their predecessors.” Engels would note that the transition of property from the women into the hands of men, made the later signares no longer retain the same status that their mothers or grandmothers had before. Searing demotes the significant impact of signares by arguing that “the key historic role of the signares was to set in motion a process of local accumulation which eventually created a distinct class of slave-owning merchants who were tied to the islands.” The distinct class of slave-owning merchants Searing refers to were called habitants. The habitants were in fact the descendents of signares and European men (primarily the French). Their background in business was founded through their mother’s experience in the commercial realm: “From this early role in the provision trade the habitants acquired the skills and capital that permitted them to gain a role in the more lucrative export trade in slaves and gum. In the course of the eighteenth century European merchants delegated considerable authority to the habitants, who gradually became indispensable middlemen in the trade with the coast and the middle and upper Senegal regions.” This transition from signares in power to their sons becoming the “indispensable middlemen in trade” can fit under the approach that women have constantly been oppressed by patriarchy. It corresponds to the institutionalization of colonization, where women’s status became demoted as the society became more and more stratified with time and as a result made men’s trading skills become more favored. However, although the golden age of signares was relatively short, it is still a shining period for feminists to look back upon and have pride in a time when strong women had authority in the matters of business, and also held their own and excelled in a economic world previously dominated by men.

Leith Mullins, “Women and Economic Change in Africa” in Women in Africa: Studies in Social and Economic Change (Standford University Press 1976) 240.

Ibid.

Ibid., 246.

Ibid., 243.

Amy Richlin, “Pliny’s Brassiere” in Roman Sexualities, 200.

George E. Brooks, Landlords & Strangers: Ecology, Society, and Trade in Western Africa, 1000-1630 (Westview Press 1993), 137

Ibid., 139.

James F. Searing, West African Slavery and Atlantic Commerce: The Senegal River valley, 1700-1860 (Cambridge University Press: 1993), 100.

Catherine Coquery-Vidrovitch, African Women: A Modern History (Éditions Desjonqueres 1994) translated by Beth Gillian Raps English (Westview Press 1997), 53.

George E. Brooks “The Signares of Saint-Louis and Gorée: Women Entrepreneurs in Eighteenth-Century Senegal” in Women in Africa: Studies in Social and Economic Change, 30.

Searing, West African Slavery and Atlantic Commerce, 99.

Ibid., 100.

Coquery-Vidrovitch, African Women, 55.

George E. Brooks, Eurafricans in Western Africa: Commerce, Social Status, Gender, And Religious Observance from the Sixteenth to the Eighteenth Century (Ohio University Press 2003), 211.

Ibid.

Ibid.

Ibid., 216.

Searing, West African Slavery and Atlantic Commerce, 105.

Brooks, “The Signares of Saint-Louis and Gorée: Women Entrepreneurs in Eighteenth-Century Senegal” Women in Africa: Studies in Social and Economic Change, 36

Brooks, Eurafricans in Western Africa: Commerce, Social Status, Gender, And Religious Observance, 210.

Ibid., 270.

Searing, West African Slavery and Atlantic Commerce, 93.

Brooks, “The Signares of Saint-Louis and Gorée: Women Entrepreneurs in Eighteenth-Century Senegal” Women in Africa: Studies in Social and Economic Change, 26.

Brooks, Eurafricans in Western Africa: Commerce, Social Status, Gender, And Religious Observance, 216.

Brooks, “The Signares of Saint-Louis and Gorée: Women Entrepreneurs in Eighteenth-Century Senegal” Women in Africa: Studies in Social and Economic Change, 34.

Searing, West African Slavery and Atlantic Commerce, 113.

Ibid.

Ibid.

Ibid., 95.

Ibid., 96.

"The bearded man, a talented weaver according to the author, is shown with an earring and what appears to be an amulet (gris-gris) hanging from his neck; he belonged to the kingdom of Sine, one of the pre-colonial Wolof states (pp. 7-8). Boilat made his drawings from life; his 24 plates are explained in an accompanying text. Born in Senegal of a French father and a bi-racial mother ("metisse signare"), Boilat left Senegal at around the age of 13, was educated in France and became ordained as a Catholic priest. He returned to Senegal in 1842, lived there for ten years as an educator and, after returning to France, completed his Esquisses Senegalaises; he also authored the first comprehensive grammar of the Wolof language. He died in France in 1901, at the age of 84. (We thank Kandioura Drame for these biographical details.)"

as shown on www.slaveryimages.org, compiled by Jerome Handler and Michael Tuite, and sponsored by the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities and the University of Virginia Library. (Click image for details):

English translation is on its way!

Al llarg d’aquests dies farem el nostre petit homenatge a diverses figures que van jugar un paper important en la Guerra de Successió, ja fos a favor del bàndol austriacista com del borbònic.

Josep Moragues i Mas (1669 - 1715) va néixer a Sant Hilari Sacalm en el si d’una família de pagesos benestants, dels quals n’era l’hereu. És un dels pocs militars que va lluitar durant tots els anys que la Guerra de Successió va durar a Catalunya, i un dels catalans que va aconseguir una més alta graduació militar.

L’any 1705, durant  l’Aixecament Militar Austriacista, va comandar les tropes vigatanes fins a derrotar les borbòniques.

Del 1707 al 1713 va ser el governador de Castellciutat, defensant així la frontera nord. Malgrat tot, el 1713 va haver de capitular la fortalesa a causa de les poques forces que quedaven per a defensa-la després de la retirada de les tropes britàniques d’aquell mateix any, quan els anglesos van signar el Tractat d’Utrecht. La capitulació es va produir amb condicions avantatjoses, però els borbònics van acabar incomplint-les.

El 1714 intenta prendre control del Pallars i la Cerdanya, però els borbònics segresten la seva família i els ha d’alliberar. Per tal de protegir-se, la família es trasllada a Cardona. Es posa a les ordres d’Antoni Desvalls, Marquès de Poal, i participa a la defesa de Cardona fins a la seva capitulació, el setembre del 1714.

El 1715, quan la guerra ja havia acabat també a Catalunya, l’últim focus de resistència era Mallorca, i el General Moragues hi intentarà arribar. Malauradament, és traït en el seu trajecte i detingut pels borbònics, que l’acusen de viatjar sense salconduit. Pocs dies després és executat sense honors militars, com si fos un delinqüent qualsevol, i és arrossegat pels carrers, decapitat i esquarterat. Finalment, van dipositar la seva calavera en una gàbia i la van penjar del Portal de Mar. La seva vídua, Magdalena de Giralt, va tractar de restablir l’honor del marit i retirar el cap, fins que al cap de 12 anys exactes, el 1727, el cap del General Moragues va ser retirat.  

***

L’escut d’armes que té de fons correspon a un dels símbols que els Vigatans van adoptar. Qui eren els Vigatans? Eren partidaris de Carles d’Àustria que havien nascut a la Vegueria de Vic, els líders dels quals havien estat anteriorment comandants de miquelets durant la Guerra dels Nou Anys (1688 - 1697). El general Moragues va ser un d’aquests líders, així com un dels que va signar el Pacte dels Vigatans (1705), que va afavorir una aliança amb Anglaterra que més tard resultaria en la firma del Tractat de Gènova (1705).  És per aquest últim tractat que Catalunya entra a la Guerra de Successió a favor del bàndol aliat.

No se’n coneixen retrats ni imatges de cap tipus, així que la interpretació que n’hem fet és totalment lliure (si bé està basada en il·lustracions aparegudes a diverses revistes i el bust que hi ha a Sort).

Throughout the late 18th and 19th centuries, Europeans who visited Senegal’s coast were fascinated by métis society, especially the signares. Villeneuve described them as “women of color and free black women [who] assume the Portuguese title of “signare” or “niara.”” (See below for more).

Europeans artists worked to portray the women in particular ways, often portraying them as phenotypically white and juxtaposing them against darker skinned female-presenting or androgynous figures meant to represent “negress” (black or African female) servants or slaves.

Signare society was much richer and more complex than European writers ever considered. For a nuanced look at métis communities’ and an engagement with that complex history that places gender and Saint-Louis’s urbanity at the center of the story, see Hilary Jones’ wonderful book The Métis of Senegal: Urban Life and Politics in French West Africa (2012). For more on European’s depictions of signares see George E. Brooks “Artists’ Depictions of Senegalese Signares: Insights Concerning French Racist and Sexist Attitudes in the Nineteenth Century.” Genéve Afrique/Geneva Africa 18, no. 1 (1980): 75-90.

Graphic Design

image

Basic IT Semester1 2014 ID5731306066 : week 3 Academic Information Searching  Individual Assignment

Graphic Design

The word design means to mark out, or to make a sign or a mark. It come from the Latin word ”Desiganre” and “Signare” . Graphic design is a new language that has been used to communicate by using not only just an alphabet or picture, but Graphic design is to design a language   by using the elements of art. It will tell a story and make it more interesting.

Element of art

1. “Line”   lines can be horizontal, vertical, or diagonal, straight or curved, thick or thin

 2. “Shape” can be geometric (squares and circles) , or organic (free form and natural shapes)

3. “Forms” are 3 dimensional (3D) shapes expressing length, width, and depth.

 4. “Space”  is the area between and around objects.                  

5. “Color” is light reflected off of object.               

6. ”Texture” is  the surface quality that can be seen and felt

References:

Du Mont, J. J., & Janis, M. D. (2013). VIRTUAL DESIGNS. Stanford Technology Law Review, 107-182.

ปาพจน์  หนุนภักดี. (2555). Graphic Design Principles (second edition). อาคารจัสมินอินเตอร์เนชั่นแนลทาวเวอร์.บริษัท ไอดีซี พรีเมียร์จำกัด 116-176

Caption: 1. Negresse esclave, 2. Signare de L’Isle St. Louis, 3. Marabou ou Prelre du Pays, 4. Negre arme en Guerre. In Dominique Harcourt Lamiral, L’Afrique et le peuple afriquain (sic), considérés sous tous leurs rapports avec notre commerce et nos colonies, 1789, 81 / Source: Digital NYPL

.

Caption, “Signar ou femme de coleur du Sénégal.” In René Claude Geoffroy de Villeneuve, L’Afrique, ou histoire, moeurs, usages et coutumes des africains: le Sénégal (Paris, 1814), vol. 1, facing p. 69. (Copy in Special Collections, University of Virginia Library) as shown on http://www.slaveryimages.org, compiled by Jerome Handler and Michael Tuite, and sponsored by the Virginia Foundation for the Humanities and the University of Virginia Library. (Click image for details)

via Atlantic Slave Trade and Slave Life in the Americas:

“Caption, “Signar ou femme de coleur du Sénégal”; woman shown in elaborate dress, house in background. Villeneuve writes that women of color and free black women assume the Portuguese title of “signare” or “niara”; they live voluntarily with European men in a sort of marriage and view themselves as the legitimate spouses of these men, remaining faithful, and giving the father’s name to the children who result from this union. He provides a detailed description of their clothing, adding that gold earrings, necklaces, and bracelets form part of their ensemble (vol. 1, pp. 68-69). Villeneuve lived in the Senegal region for about two years in the mid-to-late 1780s. The engravings in his book, he writes, were made from drawings that were mostly done on the spot during his African residence (vol. 1, pp. v-vi). The same illustration appears in color in the English translation of Villeneuve; see Frederic Shoberl (ed.), Africa; containing a description of the manners and customs, with some historical particulars of the Moors of the Zahara … (London, 1821), vol. 2, facing p. 31.”

Caption: Signare dame de couleur et negresses de Saint-Louis au bain de mer — Dessin de G. Boulanger d’après Nouveaux. In Tugnot de Lanoye, F. “Voyages et Expéditions au Sénégal et dans les contrées voisines.” Le Tour du monde: nouveau journal des voyages, 1861, 24. Source: Gallica BNF (Cropped)

Caption: Signare et négresse de Saint Louis en toilette –Dessin du G. Boulager d’après aux aquaelle de Nouveaux. In Tugnot de Lanoye, F. “Voyages et Expéditions au Sénégal et dans les contrées voisines.” Le Tour du monde: nouveau journal des voyages, 1861, 18. Source: GallicaBNF (Cropped)

A selection of images from Henri Frey, Côte occidentale d’Afrique: vues, scènes, croquis. C. Marpon et E. Flammarion, 1890:

Caption: Signare en négligé (Darondeau). In Frey, Henri. Côte occidentale d’Afrique: vues, scènes, croquis. C. Marpon et E. Flammarion, 1890, 7 

Caption: “Signare quêtant à l’église, d’après Darondeau.” Frey, Henri. Côte occidentale d’Afrique: vues, scènes, croquis. C. Marpon et E. Flammarion, 1890, 8. Source: Gallica BNF

Caption: Signare de Gorée d’après une aquarelle de Darondeaux. Frey, Henri. Côte occidentale d’Afrique: vues, scènes, croquis. C. Marpon et E. Flammarion, 1890, 194. Source: Gallica BNF [Cropped]

Caption: Intèrieur de Signare (Aquarelel inédite de Darondeau). Frey, Henri. Côte occidentale d’Afrique: vues, scènes, croquis. C. Marpon et E. Flammarion, 1890, 16. Source: Gallica BNF (Cropped)

Caption: Négresse de Gorée (M.M). Frey, Henri. Côte occidentale d’Afrique: vues, scènes, croquis. C. Marpon et E. Flammarion, 1890, 111. Source: Gallica BNF (Cropped)

Caption: Un bal de signares (mulatresses) à Saint-Louis (Sénégl), après aux aquelle inédite de Nousveaux, de 1844. Frey, Henri. Côte occidentale d’Afrique: vues, scènes, croquis. C. Marpon et E. Flammarion, 1890, 11. Source: Gallica BNF

Caption: Signares en costume de deuil. Frey, Henri. Côte occidentale d’Afrique: vues, scènes, croquis. C. Marpon et E. Flammarion, 1890, 124. Source: Gallica BNF

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Les Signares du Sénégal via Atlantic Slave Trade and Slave Life in the Americas: “Caption, “Signar ou femme de coleur du Sénégal”; woman shown in elaborate dress, house in background.

Week 4 readings: spears and brooks

In the reading done by George Brooks, one gets insight of how Senegalese African women benefited from trading with Europeans. The group called signares, who had more freedom than women of europe, where able to own property and earn money, and often mad connections with European men, that allowed them to acquire wealth. Many of them had their own beautiful homes and their own slaves to work for them.

Teeoncey sanders

They were able to do this by entering marriages that mimicked business contracts. The women would remain loyal to their husbands while they were around, but if they had business that took them elsewhere, they were allowed to have marriages with traveling colonial french men. This allowed the women to move up the social ladder.

In the reading of chapter two, Spear’s Race, Sex, and Social Order, we see more focus on the issues dealing with slavery. After a brief period of relative peace between the blacks in the whites, due to the growing number of blacks and economic factors, there was the introduction of the code noir, that put stress on these relationships and gave a more clearly defined role on how black and whites should interact. It was not easily enforced upon it first being enacted. The code noir made it clear the relationships between the people living in the colonies, but it was originally beneficial to the slaves, in some areas, such as through marriage, they were able to gain their freedom.

The original code noir, eventually was redrafted and the 1685 code noir became the 1724 code noir. In the differences between the two one can see the difference in what the french where trying to accomplish with the two documents. In the 1724 code noir, the laws being created were more focused on creating laws based on the race of the people. In the code noir of 1685, it was more focused on the social status of the people. Though still under the revision of the slave code, there were still laws intended to protect the slaves from abuse, slave owners largely ignored the laws and only focused on ones that benefited them.

In reflection i find it really interesting when reading the early history of black slaves in America that the relationships between the slaves and the slave owners were more complicated than what we learn in lower levels of history. Also even among earlier readings done for the class, there has also been hints pointing toward the fact that slaves had were unclear among the earlier history of the slave trade.

@zdt96  I thought your post was really well written and informative, and it gave good insight on the reading.

Questions:

  1. Did the marrying the senegalese women make the french crown uncomfortable?

  2. How did the men react to the situation

  3. could the french colonies been prosperous without the 1764 code noir enactment.

Week 4 readings: spears and brooks

Teeoncey Sanders

In the reading done by George Brooks, one gets insight of how Senegalese African women benefited from trading with Europeans. The group called signares, who had more freedom than women of europe, where able to own property and earn money, and often mad connections with European men, that allowed them to acquire wealth. Many of them had their own beautiful homes and their own slaves to work for them

They were able to do this by entering marriages that mimicked business contracts. The women would remain loyal to their husbands while they were around, but if they had business that took them elsewhere, they were allowed to have marriages with traveling colonial french men. This allowed the women to move up the social ladder.

In the reading of chapter two, Spear’s Race, Sex, and Social Order, we see more focus on the issues dealing with slavery. After a brief period of relative peace between the blacks in the whites, due to the growing number of blacks and economic factors, there was the introduction of the code noir, that put stress on these relationships and gave a more clearly defined role on how black and whites should interact. It was not easily enforced upon it first being enacted. The code noir made it clear the relationships between the people living in the colonies, but it was originally beneficial to the slaves, in some areas, such as through marriage, they were able to gain their freedom.

The original code noir, eventually was redrafted and the 1685 code noir became the 1724 code noir. In the differences between the two one can see the difference in what the french where trying to accomplish with the two documents. In the 1724 code noir, the laws being created were more focused on creating laws based on the race of the people. In the code noir of 1685, it was more focused on the social status of the people. Though still under the revision of the slave code, there were still laws intended to protect the slaves from abuse, slave owners largely ignored the laws and only focused on ones that benefited them.

In reflection i find it really interesting when reading the early history of black slaves in America that the relationships between the slaves and the slave owners were more complicated than what we learn in lower levels of history. Also even among earlier readings done for the class, there has also been hints pointing toward the fact that slaves had were unclear among the earlier history of the slave trade.

@zdt96  I thought your post was really well written and informative, and it gave good insight on the reading.

Questions:

  1. Did the marrying the senegalese women make the french crown uncomfortable?

  2. How did the men react to the situation

  3. could the french colonies been prosperous without the 1764 code noir enactment.

Ciara Page-9/17 HST Post

http://modmobilian.com/uploads/2010/02/haiti.jpg

Is a photo from Google that shows the Natives going against and fighting the French people. That brings be to discuss what Chapter Two of Spear spoke about.

In chapter two of Spears reading which I thought this week was very interesting was some important but yet unknowing facts. This chapter talked about how the Africans joined and formed a group called Signars and began trading things and even sex with the Europeans, this lead to them becoming more wealthy and they even owned properties. The Natives and Africans were even marrying the French men to get higher up in class and to get the resources they needed. The Signars reminds me of the Bambara a group also formed by Africans which was the minorities back in the 1700s. Both groups formed together to form a alliance to go against or even use the opposing side to get what they want. The groups are similar bc they worked and stucked together to in the end benefit their self and the slaves/Africans around them. The chapter talked about how the slaves arrived to New Orleans and how the French had the Africans out on the plantation more and longer because they worked so hard and we’re much more driven and had more determination the the French nation would ever have; the French was considered “lazy and spoiled”.

It was also mentioned that the state of Nee Orleans would not make any money bc of the city profits, but surprisingly they started to sell tobacco and indigo which brought in a lot of money for the city. The selling of those two crops had brought the city much success.

Chapter two pointed out interesting facts about the major difference in the Code Noir from 1685 and the Code Noir from 1724. 1685 focused on right or wrong from slaves based on social status when the 1725 Code Noir helped married slaves and get them civil rights based on their race. The 1724 code was actually more benefiting to the slave owners not so much the slaves of that time. It told how the French were out numbered by the Natives so they were intimidated by them considering all facts the the Natives could start war between the two and win it going against the French.

@DavidM posted a question asking “Did Code Noir give rights to the slaves?” -I’m imagining he is speaking in terms of the code noir from 1724, I believe that it did grant slaves rights..It granted them freedom if married, they kids freedom which is the most important thing to me.

QUESTIONS;
1. Which Code Noir would you have rather been apart of if you were a slave at this time?

2. Do you think the Natives were given too much lee way because they out numbered the French?

3. Why do you think the slaves were so obedient with the French even after noticing that the Natives were not?

4. Do you think the Signars trading with the Europeans were beneficial?

Matt Fuller: HST 110-Week 4 log for Wednesday, September 17th.

The paper written by George E. Brooks, Jr., observes West African women who succeeded in the world of trade, and specifically, the Signares of the Senegal region.  These 18th and 19th century business women operated on the islands of Saint-Louis and Goree.  These lands would ultimately be occupied by the French at the beginning of the 1700’s.  Many of these women would often work and live with the colonial French.  Due to the ruling French resistance to the practice of intermarriage, French colonists simply adopt the way of Senegal culture, finding their customs well-suited to their needs.  Marriage under these circumstances benefits women of the Senegal region as well.  Important women within the societal structure have their own selection of slave-workers; those who will collect gold, so that the Signares may use it to boost their livelihoods.  It should be further noted, that the Signares, or specifically, the ethnically Wolof of Senegal, were very adaptable women who quickly learnt the French language.  And Senegalese women were much admired for their beauty and generally classy nature.

To enhance her power and status, the Signares entered unique marriage contracts with colonial Frenchmen.  They would maintain loyalty to their husband until his voyage took him elsewhere, at which point they were free to repeat this process with a new traveling Frenchman.  I think this was one way to keep shared commercial interests afloat, so this marriage contract arguably had the feel of a business contract.  Many Signares lived in well-constructed impressive homes and as put together by their skilled class of slave-laborers.  The slaves under these conditions were treated in a generally respectful way.  Signares’ power was not extended to other parts of the region inhabited by colonial British, and this due to certain inflexibilities of the British when it came to marriage and trade.

Chapter 2 of the book by Spear observes a brief period of relative calm in race relations.  This would be in Louisiana during the early 1700’s.  Slave-laborers were crucial economically and as a defense against warring Native Americans.  A rise in free Africans among the Louisiana colonists would be observed during this timeframe as well.  Interestingly, Page 57 clarifies that the cost for female slaves was incredibly high in comparison to other slave-laborers.  This could be observed as their value individually, perhaps if some were viewed upon as potential companions for ruling French colonists, or the fact that they could produce yet more slave-laborers to work the land.  Of course, the text indicates that some persons enslaved held a variety of skills.

Through the implement of the Code Noir in 1724, slaves were granted certain rights.  They were protected under this new law, with freedom of marriage among other slaves, and the agreement that slave-labor families won’t be torn apart by means of selling.  This legal document also took away a vast many rights as well, all of which are too obvious to mention.  Along with having ones family intact, another good thing about the repressive Code Noir is perhaps the fact that slave masters were to be overtly prevented from utilizing cruel punishment against their slaves.  And if I am reading the text correctly, it appears that article 9 of the code allows an unmarried free man to engage freely in marriage with a slave, thus making her and her children free themselves.  I’m assuming that this applies to both free black and indentured servants of French extraction, and if so, it was probably short-lived in terms of being socially acceptable during the era.  The text indicates on Page 62 that it was a short-lived situation prior to the code being further revised.

Under the heading in the book of “To Observe His Majesties Ordinances”, those slaves who were treated too well, arguably, and forgot their place as slaves in the eyes of the ruling French, were to receive 50 lashes.  This struck me as especially superficial and strange punishment, very much a soul-crushing experience.  But it is a mixed bag, as some slaves in French colonial Louisiana are observed as receiving justice in abuse cases against the harsh treatment of their masters, and Chapter Two mentions one specific instance of this.  And rather than being prosecuted, slave owners or persons of financial prestige would simply pay damages (P. 73). 

And finally, the Senegalese are mentioned, and as observed by the contemporary French historian Antione-Simon Le Page du Pratz.  He praises in his writings, their physical beauty and quickness to learn.  He was not alone in his praise.  Other French knew them through their successful trade outposts in West Africa, as the paper by Brooks, Jr. clarified.

Questions:

  • Why do you think the French differed from the British in relation to interaction with free and enslaved Africans, might it have something to do with each European superpower of the era having a different definition of race?
  • Isn’t it interesting that a ruling ethnic class in West Africa had their own slave labor force, and more to the point, does the very nature of the word slave change in your mind based on how they were treated by the Signares?
  • Are there natural parallels between the Signares and the French ruling class of the era?

@lafavelizzy248, you asked: “Do you believe the signare women should be allowed to own slaves?” This is a very interesting question, as it feels to me that the Signares were almost like imperial rulers, or queens, really.  The way in which slaves were treated is arguably very much the opposite compared to the treatment of African slave laborers sent to the United States.  As from what I read, even some of the slaves, those who worked as expert house builders and so forth, had slaves of their own.  It seems to me that the Singares would not be who they were without this class of loyal slave workers.

Finally, here is a woman wearing a headdress of the Senegal in the following illustration:

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