shutterbabe

I’m 63 pages into photojournalist Deborah Copaken Kogan’s fantastic memoir, Shutterbabe: Adventures in Love and War.

“I needed to live, to learn, to observe, to create, and insofar as photography allowed me to do all four of these things, I was both smitten and satisfied.”

: I can’t put this book down.

:: I want to live this woman’s life.

::: I need to go out shooting, like now.

I loved to go out and shoot in strange places, to talk to the types of people i’d never meet were it not for the excuse of the camera. I loved the heft of the black metal in my hands, the way it felt like a weapon, i loved to press the shutter, to freeze time, to turn little slices of life into rectangles rife with metaphor. i loved to collect the rectangles, like so many souvenir trinkets, to gaze at them, study them, find the one that best summarized a particular lived moment. i loved the smell of black and white chemicals. loved to dip a naked piece of white photographic paper into a bath of developer and watch the image miraculously materialize, watch life, a moment, reborn. Loved rescuing the ever darkening image, saving it from blackness with my tongs, immersing it into stop bath, then into fixer, imagining all those silver crystals stopping, fixing, imagining my little rectangle live on forever.
— 

Deborah Copaken Kogan

Book Shutterbabe

   "  I’ve always found it helpful to keep my requirements for satisfaction to a minimum: fewer basic needs equals greater contentment; the fewer the variables you concern yourself with, the less chance you have for disappointment. In fact, when you look at pure math, it’s amazing to see to what degree the odds start stacking up against you as the number of variables increases.
     (The equation, should you have some spare time, is fairly simple: n^2-n+2=x, where n stands for the number of variables and x equals the number of possible outcomes. Two variables give you four possible outcomes; three give you eight, four give you fourteen, etc.)
     Here’s the rub. These elementary laws of probability apply to love as well…Statistically speaking, true love is extremely rare.


-Deborah Copaken Kogan, Shutterbabe


 

“I loved to go out and shoot in strange places, to talk to the types of people I’d never meet were it not for the excuse of the camera. I loved the heft of the black metal in my hands, the way it felt like a weapon. I loved to press the shutter, to freeze time, to turn little slices of life into rectangles rife with metaphor. I loved to collect the rectangles, like so many souvenir trinkets, to gaze at them, study them, find the one that best summarized a particular lived moment. I loved the smell of the black-and-white chemicals. Loved the dip to a naked piece of white photographic paper into a bath of developer and watch the image miraculously materialize, watch life, a moment, reborn. Loved rescuing the ever darkening image, saving it from blackness with my tongs, immersing it into the stop bath, then into the fixer, imagining all those silver crystals stopping, fixing, imagining my little rectangle living on forever” Deborah Copaken Kogan