shame-in-the-way

anonymous asked:

I think my high school is going to do the king and I, but we have no Asian people in the theatre department. We had auditions for our new season today, so it's not like someone can join now. I don't know how to feel about pretending to be another race if I had to. I don't want anyone to think we are being disrespectful, but I understand why people might find it that way. Any thoughts/advice as to how to handle it?

That’s a tough situation to be in.  I’d say if you end up in that situation, talk to your director about gathering research to help the cast better understand the culture.  Perhaps bringing in people who are native and are knowledgeable on the time period and culture so that you can represent them in the most respectful way.  And there’s no shame in expressing your concern to the director, who should take your concern seriously and try to make the experience as respectful as possible.  

oh also, one of my 5 year old students high fived me in the boob today. And I was all, oh great, they’re comfortable with me now. cue the groping >_< And then right after she did it, one of the boys went to do it and I was all NOPE and caught him before he got all the way through the swing ^_^;; Fool me once, shame on me :P

I wouldve had much more respect for the BK fandom if they were more like Kai was wrong, He has to make it up for Bonnie, he is a sociopath and I love him because of that


instead they claim Kai is a misunderstood bunny, Bonnie should be blamed for trapping him as a revenge of giving her ptsd, Kai dragging Bonnie was nothing and he had been changed


Even though they know the whole empathy emotion originated because of Luke and their merge. They slut shame Julie for keeping the characters the way they are, make reasons to hate the bamon fandom. How am I supposed to respect if they are like that?

Author Patricia Park first read Charlotte Bronte’s “Jane Eyre” as a 12-year-old child of Korean-Argentine parents. She was particularly struck by Jane’s status as an orphan in the novel, and how that status made Jane an outcast in her own family.

“Orphan” was something Park’s mother called her when “I was acting in a shameful way that disgraced her family,” she told Here & Now. Years later, Patricia Park decided to write her own version of the “Jane Eyre” story, called “Re Jane.”

Set in modern times, her Jane, Jane Re, is a half-Korean, half-American girl raised in a Korean community in Queens, New York. Jane Re’s life becomes upended when she decides to become an au pair for a Brooklyn couple.

Read an excerpt of “Re Jane” and hear our talk with Patricia Park.

Photo of Patricia Park by Allana Taranto

honestly, theatre kids need to calm the fuck down with their blatant elitism and the thought that they have some sort of secret organization of high-cultured students who are better than everyone else because they love musicals more than television.

stop being mean to the new kid in your drama club. stop judging people whose favorite musical is wicked. stop shaming other actors for singing/acting/dancing something a different way. please calm down, you are no better than anybody else.

Ugh after seeing all this fat shaming talk lemme just point or why it’s dumb as FUCK and rude. Okay so say someone has a thyroid condition and was born with a larger body type due to genetics. How easy do you think it would be for them to lose weight? It would be pretty difficult in the damn first place and you shaming their bodies with your privileged self doesn’t fucking help them at all. So think twice before shaming someone, you don’t know their story. That person is probably way prettier than you on the outside AND inside.

anonymous asked:

skinny people are privileged. the world caters on skinny people. Many clothing stores are for smaller people. it sounds better to say "Im a size small" than "Im a size large". Ive never once heard someone tell anyone theyre skinny as an insult. Fat is used as an insult. People see fat people as "weak" because apparently "They can't control themselves around food" Skinny people are seen as "Inspirations" because "wow you must work so hard to keep your body like that" skinny shaming doesn't exist

Wow… like just wow! I’m sorry, you probably don’t mean it in a bad way and I really don’t want what I’m going to say to come off rude but… you’re wrong. Skinny shaming does exist. And I know it’s not as known as fat shaming but it hurts people the same way and it is real.

I, myself, am a skinny person and I have experienced skinny shaming. From 6 to 18 I’ve been asked why I’m so skinny; I’ve been casually called ‘anorexic’, ‘flat’ and 'a bag of bones’ in the corridors… that was just how people called me.

And don’t ever think that it was a compliment because it wasn’t. When I was 15, I decided that I had had enough and that I wanted to put on some weight so that people would see I wasn’t anorexic. For six entire months I ate like I was three people and I managed to gain 5 kilos (around 11 pounds).

After six months spent binging, my stomach gave up on me and I spent a whole weekend throwing up… I lost 7 kilos (more than 15 pounds) in three days and ended up at the hospital because after that my body was too weak…

Long story short, I’ve been trying to recover from a binge eating disorder for the past year and a half…
So please don’t tell me that skinny shaming doesn’t exist, don’t tell me that skinny people are privileged…

At the end of the day, people are people and they’ll always find something to talk about.

Our 1961 Jazzmaster, refinished in Daphne Blue. It’s fantastic, and that tort is beautiful. It’s a shame that the guard is broken in a few places, but we have ways of mending them… Will be up for grabs soon at @mmguitarbar #guitar #vintageguitar #vintage #jazzmaster #fender #fenderguitars #seattle #1960s #1961 #tort #daphne #blue #offsetguitars #seattle #mmguitarbar (at Mike & Mike’s Guitar Bar)

I often see posts like “Support ALL black women!

 and while that’s good and all I’m really not going to lie; some of y'all really ain’t shit. Like I am truly not here for 

  • rude black girls 
  • mean-spirited black girls 
  • conniving/deceitful black girls 
  • black girls that feel they’re better than other black girls 
  • black girls that treat their family/friends/people in general poorly 
  • black girls that shame other black girls for the way they choose to dress/ do their hair/ makeup, etc. 
  • black girls that are homophobic/transphobic
  • black girls that unapologetically practice adultery or cheat on their partners 
  • black girls that brag about being homewreckers or side chicks
  • black girls that abuse their significant others and/or children 
  • black girls that enjoy being bullies 
  • black girls that spread their negativity, anti-blackness, and/or self hate to make others feel bad about themselves

 If you’re not a good person, I’m not here for you. Point blank.