10

Jessica Rey presents the history of the evolution of the swimsuit including the origins of its design, how it has changed overtime and the post-feminist association of the bikini symbolizing female empowerment. She refers to neuro-scientific studies revealing how male brains react to images of scantily clad women versus images of women deemed modest and what the implications of the results are for women in society.

(Note: As the OP, I disagree with Rey’s approach to putting the onus on women to alter ourselves rather than to alter the male perception of women – brain wiring has plenty to do with socialization and if we worked against the culture that fuels men’s objectification of women, women’s clothing choices would matter far less in terms of how men perceive us and determine how to interact with us).

Jessica Rey - The Evolution of the Swim Suit

I love women,” coming from a man, almost always means “I love when women please me,” “I love to imagine fucking women,” “I love to jack off to women’s pornified bodies,” “I love women who don’t challenge me in a way that makes me uncomfortable,” or “I love the idea of women.

On a rare occasion, a woman will tell me that she doesn’t mind being objectified by men. To that I say:

That’s nice, but he’s not doing it because you don’t mind. He’s not waiting until he finds you, the (probably) only woman in the area who doesn’t mind. He’s doing it to every woman. He’s doing it because he wants to and he doesn’t care who likes it, and who doesn’t. He doesn’t stick around long enough to ask, he just takes.

Lauren Stardust

"This is what I was wearing today when two women saw fit to laugh at me in a restaurant while I sat and ordered food with my partner.

It started with one pointing me out to the other.

I watched while the friend “casually” stretched and turned to face me, her head whipping back around to confirm her shared opinion of what I as wearing. They both began to laugh.

I sighed, willing to let it go… but it didn’t stop.

Finally when the friend pulled out her phone to take my photo over her shoulder (disguising it as a selfie) I had had enough.

I got up from my table approached them both and simply asked “I’m sorry but are you both laughing at me?”

They responded that it wasn’t the case, but the obviousness of whole façade made the bullshit buzzer go off in my head.

“Oh good! I was starting to feel really self conscious!” (I finished) and went back to my seat.

What these two women subjected me too today is a symptom of Internalised Misogyny:

“involuntary internalization by women of the sexist messages that are present in their societies and culture.” (for further reading http://everydayfeminism.com/2014/07/choice-feminism-internalized-misogyny/)

I haven’t mentioned the women’s age or what they were wearing because it’s not relevant.

How they present themselves does not affect me.

It doesn’t change my life in any way.

Women are constantly judged for everything. It’s inescapable.

Let me get one thing straight.

I am fully aware that I dress like I’ve been fucked by a unicorn.

I know because I dress myself every morning… and would you believe? It’s deliberate!!!

I don’t wake up and think “Gee, I wonder how I can appeal to strangers today?”

Our patriarchal society makes strangers -of any gender- think it acceptable to humiliate a woman based on how she woke up that morning and got dressed to please herself.

So next time you catch yourself critiquing someone’s appearance negatively (In particular, how women dress) maybe try to think instead of why you feel the need to make that horrible assessment?

Are you intimidated by them? Are you sexualising them? Are you repulsed because they don’t adhere to your standards of beauty?

Then ask yourself why any of those things bother you in the first place.”

#feminism   #feminist   #internalisedmisogyny   #patriarchalsociety

Source

9

I was reading some posts about how Dolls Kill is currently selling a sexualized “Native American” Costume. I went searching to see if they had any more, and surprisingly no. But seeing all the sexy style costumes made me think of Yandy.com, a lingerie website that is very much into Halloween costumes.

 I thought hey, let’s give them the benefit of the doubt here. I liked them on facebook and they never posted appropriative costumes and I’ve never seen any sourced to them on facebook. I bet they totally realize the dangers and horrors of these costumes and fetishization like that.

 Oh man…was I wrong.

I can’t even fit them all in a photo set, and every word of this sentence is linking ONLY to the "Native American” ones.

Of which there are 55 costumes, oh sooo easily accessed through this category on the homepage and side bar

They don’t stop here. They have dedicated categories including Geisha Costumes, Eskimo Costumes, and G*psy Costumes.

 And don’t forget the rest of them that may not have their own racist category, but are still there, scattered and hidden in other categories such as the 7 Day of the Dead costumes they have, and the “Aloha Hula Girl” and “Tahitian Sweetie” I also found, unfortunately. I don’t even know how the hell i found this “Dragon Lady" one, that surprisingly is not in the Geisha category.

 The costume names range in each categories from ridiculous shit like “Chief Hottie Body Costume” to “Native American Temptress”, and “Japanese Entertainer Costume” to “Asian Persuasion”.

  I honestly don’t understand this crap. How can people seriously fucking do this? How do you think it’s okay? Before even finding out about the proper terms like cultural appropriation and fetishization, before i even had any idea that this was a widely recognized thing by others, I almost always looked down on these costumes. I didn’t know that they were actually as horrible as they truly are, but I always had that sort of sense within myself you know? How can you just throw on someone’s culture and not give a fuck about it whether its a sexualized costume like these, a less sexualized one, or even a legitimate cultural garment.

  I could continue going on and on but I’m just so tired of this shit. Just.Fucking.Stop. Whether or not YOU agree with it, costumes like this hurt people. It promotes stereotypical fetishization that becomes the leading reason behind countless rapes. Culturally appropriative costumes in general hurt the people that are part of that culture. By wearing this shit, you are taking a part something that is so important to so many people and destroying it, showing us what a gross racist asshole you are in the process.

  There are a million perfectly fine things you can dress up as, so why the fuck do you have to do this to my culture? Go be a fucking octopus or something I don’t even care.

3

#AskHerMore 

  • Elizabeth Moss gives the middle finger to the mani-cam
  • Jennifer Aniston symbolically whips away the mani-cam while refusing to do it
  • Cate Blanchett calls out the upskirt cam or whatever they call it - objectification cam?

Women are setting the stage for a red-carpet rebellion

"The pushback began a couple years ago with the advent of the social media hashtag #AskHerMore. The hashtag grew out of an effort spearheaded by Jennifer Siebel Newsom, a former actress who wrote, directed and co-produced the 2011 Oscar-nominated documentary “Miss Representation,” which explored the limited ways women are depicted in film, television and other forms of pop culture.

#AskHerMore is an attempt to get red carpet reporters to move beyond “who are you wearing” and focus on “what are you doing?”

Read the full piece here

youtube

Warning this video is explicit.

We at helloflo are constantly sharing information about the media’s portrayal of women and how it is often less than empowering. That’s why when we saw this video we felt we needed to share it. It is explicit and not appropriate for all viewers. But - it has a very strong message about equality. 

Yes - this video is funny. But it’s also serious. The point they are making is not lost on us - there is a serious double standard in media. 

Watch and share.

***For colored girls who have been called “thicker than a Snickers” and other dumbass colloquialisms when being called “attractive” was not enuf.

I do not enjoy being referred to as “thicker than a Snickers” and if you think I’m being nitpicky feel free to go and tell that to someone who cares. I do not enjoy being reduced down to the rack near the cash register at Walgreens. The years I spent learning to love myself and the messages I have received from other young women as thanks for having inspired them are more valuable than f*cking nougat. My body is not a piñata favor. My confidence is not confection.

I know what you’re thinking. I’m like Raven Baxter or Dionne Warwick or something. I know you’re thinking “I mean, it’s just something people say! Chill! It’s no big deal!” It’s only “no big deal” because you haven’t realized how…how…stupid it actually is! Not only is it offensive to compare a woman’s body to something that will probably kill you over time, it doesn’t even make any sense! Thicker than a Snickers??? Whet? In my expert opinion, Snickers bars are relatively average in size in comparison to other candy bars. They aren’t necessarily “thick”. Not even in consistency as compared to competitors. So wtf are you saying to me? In that case I’m thicker than a Milky Way too. And don’t you dare say it’s because “thicker” and “snicker” rhyme. Two words rhyming doesn’t justify them being put together to describe a human being. In that case, all of you loud ass n*ggas are officially louder than some chowder. Do you see how f*cking stupid that is? I dare you to put your ear to your next bowl of New England clam and make that sh*t make sense. I hope you scald your ear off.

I’m really proud of what I’m building for myself and I am proud of every woman (or man, I’m completely gender and identity friendly) who took a look at an image of me or anyone else and at least considered wearing that pair of shorts she told herself she has too much cellulite to wear. Body positivity is real and it’s hard. And I expect to be sexualized frequently along the way (a whole ‘nother topic), but for the love of God, stop stuffing this progress into a chocolatey outer shell! If you see an attractive women, tell her she’s attractive. Tell her she’s beautiful. Tell her she’s gotdamn fine. But do not tell her she’s 27g of sugar. Appreciate her life a little more than what truncating her down to food suggests. Her confidence is not confection. Stop trying to melt it in your mouth.

✌💅

Israeli women do ‘Gaza Strip’ for IDF

After thinking long and hard of a way to boost morale among IDF soldiers engaged in combat, a new Facebook page is attempting to bring a fresh and uplifting meaning to the words “Gaza Strip.”

Over the past few days, dozens of women have begun posting racy photos of themselves online, with messages in support of Israel’s troops inscribed across their scantily clad bodies.

The Facebook page, titled “Standing With the IDF – Maintaining a Protective Edge” (in a rough translation from the Hebrew), was created Wednesday night and has already gained over a thousand likes.

The page’s creator, Gavriel Beyo, explained that it was his sincere concern for the soldiers’ morale that motivated him to embark on the unusual campaign.

“We have two bountiful resources in Israel that are impossible to compete with, Israeli minds and the most beautiful women in the world,” Beyo explained in a post on Facebook

“We also have a military front so… why not combine the two?” he added.

“Besides, what chance does Hamas have in the face of our women?”

Beyo stated that the responses to his endeavor were overwhelmingly positive, with many troops expressing to him their great joy over the images.

“Think of these pictures any time it gets hard (in any way…),” Beyo advised the soldiers.

“Remember what you’re fighting for and what is waiting for you back home.”

You’ve got to be fucking kidding me.

(h/t to arkkon)

5

What if Marvel drew its male heroes like its female ones

 In an effort to complicate the all-too-common “notion that women only exist to titillate straight men,” writer and co-host of the podcast “Matt & Brett Love Comics,” Brett White, decided to give male superheroes some sexy variant covers of their very own.

As White points out in his introduction to the images, the issue isn’t with sexiness itself; rather, it’s with the fact that female superheroes — and women more generally — are disproportionately subject to sexualization in a way that men and male characters are not.

It’s time for a change |Follow micdotcom

#bodposfeb 20: Ad busting

There is so much wrong with this ad. I probably won’t even be able to cover it all, by here goes:

1. Sexualization of women’s bodies to capture attention. 

Why does Joanna Krupa need to be near-naked in order to fight for animal rights? This ad doesn’t address any serious issues related to the fur industry or animal cruelty; it’s just shock tactics. Women should be able to express their opinions and be listened to without having to rely on sexually objectifying themselves to draw attention to the issues they care about. 

2. Implies that the purpose of women is to be attractive

The ad implies that women should make decisions based on whether or not we will be perceived as attractive. Women have much more to offer than simply their looks, but this ad suggests that our appearance should be a driving force in our decision making. 

3. Makes judgments on women’s personal decisions about their bodies

The ad suggests that there is something shameful about having pubic hair, which is a completely natural part of a woman’s body. What a woman chooses to do with this hair, like any other part of her body, is completely her own decision and shouldn’t be influenced by shame tactics from the media. 

I’m looking forward to seeing your critical analysis of advertisements! Share with #bodposfeb :)