scupture

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Sculptures by Francesco Albano

Francesco Albano was born in Oppido Mamertina, Italy on November 19, 1976.  He lives and works in Istanbul and graduated from the sculpture department of Accademia di Belle Arti di Carrara in 2000. In 2005 he won the National Prize of Arts-MIUR for sculpture. In 2008 he had his first solo exhibition “Everyday Bestiary” curated by Flavio Arensi and Stefano Castelli at the Castle of San Giorgio di Legnano(MI). Dovevaccadere-SALe (space art legnano). The same year, Turkish director Cansin Sağesen made a short movie inspired by his works. In September 2009, he had his second solo exhibition “Five Easy Pieces” at Ex- Marmi Gallery in Pietrasanta. In June 2011 he had two sculptures in in the 54th International Art Exhibition in Venice Biennale at the Arsenale in the exhibition”Lo Stato dell’ Arte”. In December 2011 his sculptures series P.I.E.T.A.S. were exhibited at the gallery Studio 9 in Istanbul.

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Berlinde De Bruyckere.:Suffering and Protection

Flemish sculptor creates sculptures and drawings of suffering human bodies that resemble nothing so much as reality. It mixes in his sculptures on religious grounds and media images and writes the Christian motif of the human suffering in the contemporary era. The confrontation with the body that engages the artist led to questions about the ethics of our society and are the place to fundamental questions about the nature of the human being.
These disturbing and uncannily lifelike sculptures by Belgian artist Berlinde De Bruyckere are incredibly visceral and eerie. The repulsion instinctively triggered in the viewer comes from their verisimilitude, and the sense of reality of this nameless, grotesque, distorted, half-human, seemingly fluid flesh; combined with their beauty, the delicate, subtle mottling of colors, the pure realistic visceral fleshiness of the works, and their technical grace.

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 Skull Violin - Stratton Violin by  Jeff Stratton

Jeff Stratton has been playing the violin for years before he started to build his own. “I love this instrument and possibilities it has to offer in sound and style for playing. What you see in this violin is an inspiration, an idea come to life. A vision of what I would like to play. I can`t say i have been building electric violins for years and years. What I can say is that I enjoy it fully, and strive to make an instruments that is a work of art whether it is being played or not.”

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Installations made using thousands of dollars in discarded lottery tickets by Ghost of a Dream 

Under the artists’ name Ghost of a Dream, Lauren Was and Adam Eckstrom started a collaborative project in New York, where the two artists live. After artist’s residencies in Basel and Berlin, Galerie Paris Beijing is pleased to welcome them for the first time to Beijing and present site-specific installations in a solo show entitledPrice of Happiness.

Based on collages and large scale objects, their strongly visual works revolve around promises of wealth offered by the lottery. Lottery tickets are pasted everywhere inGhost of a Dream’s work. These scratched tickets carry real dreams that mostly disappear just as quickly as they come. Although they are just discarded bits of paper, they represent fantasies of opulence, which vanish and reappear with each new lottery ticket.

In Price of Happiness, these dreams come alive through artistic compositions of objects, mirrors, photographs and slogans. In a country which is fascinated by the Western way of life and at a time where universal dreams are associated with consumption frenzy, these artists show us faded dreams and the process which is inherent in this fast easy money game: the hope of winning followed by the frustration of losing. In the end, these escapist moments make us lose much more than we win, as they create a bright future that will never exist.

Both born in the USA, Lauren Was and Adam Eckstrom met while attending graduate school at Rhode Island School of Design, where Adam graduated in painting and Lauren in sculpture. They founded the artistic duo Ghost of a Dream in 2007 and a year later made their first piece in the Easy Money series, The Dream Car. Their work has been exhibited in New York, Rhode Island, Miami, Berlin, London and Basel and also has been featured in The Guardian (London), The Independent (London), Time Out (New York), and the World of Interiors among other publications. In November 2009, they received the first annual Young Masters Art Prize in London.’

press release courtesy of Galerie Paris-Beijing

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The Photographic and Sculptural Blend of Osang Gwon

The artwork of Korean artist Gwon Osang is a unique blend of photography and sculpture.  He begins by extensively photographing his subjects, then attaching the photographs to plaster sculptures and molds.  The result is a strange mix of two and thee dimensions.  Also, while the sculptures may point to classical bronze and marble statues, the photos and poses are much more reminiscent of fashion photography.  Thus, the sculptures seem simultaneously heavy and light in physical weight as well as seriousness.  They’re especially fitting for a time marked by the abundance of images and hyper-documentation.

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Limestone reliefs of panthers and sculptures of seated females wearing poloi, possibly forming the lintel of Building (‘Temple’) A at Prinias. Near Eastern and Egyptian stylistic influences can be discerned in the work. Archaic period, 7th c. BCE.

The foundation of the Greek trading colony of Naukratis in Egypt before 630 BCE brought the Greeks into direct contact with the monumental stone architecture of the Egyptians. Not long after that, construction began in Greece of the first stone buildings since the fall of the Mycenaean kingdoms. At Prinias on Crete, for example, the Greeks built a stone temple, called Temple A, around 625 BCE to honor an unknown deity. 

Temple A at Prinias is the earliest known example of a Greek temple with sculptured decoration. Above the doorway was a huge limestone lintel with a relief rieze of Orientalizing panthers with frontal heads -the same motif as that on the contemporary Corinthian black-figure amphora, underscoring the stylistic unity of Greek art at this time. 

-Gardner’s Art Through the Ages: The Western Perspective, Volume I, page 91.

Photos courtesy & taken by Dan Diffendale.

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By Aganetha Dyck, in a most unusual collaboration, this artist begins the process with broken and damaged figurines which strategically have wax or honey placed on them to attract the bees when placed in a hive. It then becomes the bees job to repair the figurines by building their meticulous honeycomb over the contours and indents. 

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Magnus Gjoen Art

Magnus Gjoen ’s prints examines how to change peoples relationship and preconceived notions of objects. Something which is potentially extremely destructive can be made into beautiful yet fragile objects of art. It’s this misconception of beauty which Magnus Gjoen wants us to see in a different light, being it weapons, animals or the human race itself. The latter which is capable of creating immense beauty but also capable of destroying it all. Taking inspiration from street and pop art and juxtapositioning it with fine art, he creates new and modern takes on old masterpieces or manipulates something powerful and strong into something fragile but beautiful. He often questions the correlation between religion, war, beauty & destruction in his art.