How A Dissolvable ‘Tampon’ Could One Day Help Women Stop HIV

University of Washington bioengineers have discovered a potentially faster way to deliver a topical drug that protects women from contracting HIV. Their method spins the drug into silk-like fibers that quickly dissolve when in contact with moisture, releasing higher doses of the drug than possible with other topical materials such as gels or creams.

“This could offer women a potentially more effective, discreet way to protect themselves from HIV infection by inserting the drug-loaded materials into the vagina before sex,” said Cameron Ball, a UW doctoral student in bioengineering and lead author on a paper in the August issue of Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy.

The UW team previously found that electrically spun cloth could be dissolved to release drugs. These new results build upon that research, showing that the fiber materials can hold 10 times the concentration of medicine as anti-HIV gels currently under development.
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This research was funded by the National Institutes of Health.

Care about research like this? Sign on to our Thunderclap campaign (http://bit.ly/NIHthunderclap) to tell Congress to finish what it started and pass the FY 2015 Labor-HHS spending bill now to restore sequestration cuts so that the promise of National Institutes of Health (NIH)-sponsored research can be realized.

Anatomy of a Cactus illustration. Cacti are the only plant that I don’t straight up murder by accident. So I had two great models in my apartment.

If you want to pick up an art print of your own you can here at my shop:

https://www.etsy.com/listing/186457403/the-anatomy-of-a-cactus-art-print?ref=listing-shop-header-0

Nessuno ha detto che sarebbe stato facile..
—  Io (via nonlasciarmiadesso)
In high school I got all this guidance, like ‘Why do you want to take calculus? You’re just going to get married and have babies.’ Or ‘What do you mean you want to take a physics course? You’re just going to be a housewife.’

“Science is not only compatible with spirituality; it is a profound source of spirituality. When we recognize our place in an immensity of light‐years and in the passage of ages, when we grasp the intricacy, beauty, and subtlety of life, then that soaring feeling, that sense of elation and humility combined, is surely spiritual. So are our emotions in the presence of great art or music or literature, or acts of exemplary selfless courage such as those of Mohandas Gandhi or Martin Luther King, Jr. The notion that science and spirituality are somehow mutually exclusive does a disservice to both.” 
― Carl Sagan,

Another illustration for my women in science series. Jane Goodall is a primatologist, ethologist and anthropologist and is the worlds top expert on chimpanzees.

Get one here at: https://www.etsy.com/listing/197871802/women-in-science-jane-goodall

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