This is literal first hand PROOF that these “skinny teas” are a massive scam.

This photo is of me in 2012, I have NEVER used Skinny Tea Time or anything of the sorts.

These companies take random photos from the Internet and post “success” stories. Well in this case, they’re totally busted.

My blood is boiling, these companies are full of false advertisements and deception. Not to mention the fact they steal images of women who have worked on a healthy lifestyle of nourishing food/exercise - and post a false story to sell their product, with no regard to the truth behind that body.

Don’t waste your fucking money.

6

This is the ghastly true story of how my daughter, Alice, was manipulated by a greedy corporation and a Disney actor she admired.  On Friday we heard a radio ad on 96.1 asking for kids who want to be on Disney shows (like Jessie and Lab Rats) to audition.  Alice called with our permission and we were told a company called “model and talent” was having auditions last Saturday (August 30, 2014) at a nice Atlanta hotel.  They emailed us a short script (Raisin Bran) for Alice to memorize and perform at the audition. 

When we arrived at the hotel we found about 100 kids waiting to audition.  We were given an application to complete and directed to the ballroom.  Each parent had to hold up their ID and pause before a tablet while they filmed before we were ushered into our seats. Afterward we were told this was a security precaution in case one of our kids got lost in the hotel and they could use the picture to locate them quickly. An authoritative lady, clad in black (with a haircut just like Alice’s to my great pleasure) began the presentation.  She revealed that every person we interacted with (getting our application from, showing ID to, etc.) was also a judge (who were also models from brands we’d all heard of) and that our audition began the minute we walked through the lobby door.  She began conditioning us to know that our kids would only be successful in this business if their parents were cooperative and willing to make sacrifices.  She told us how her parents would fly her across continents every two weeks for auditions and how that made it possible for her to get work.  She began to tell us how “model and talent”, a commercial networking service, makes it possible to get exposure to the top talent agencies and casting directors in the country.  She informed us that their website is exclusive and that about only 25 of the many kids sitting in that room would make the first cut.  She involved the kids in the entire process.  She would name a Disney show and ask the kids to raise their hands if they’d heard of it.  They all raised their hands, and to their delight they were told that “model and talent” was responsible for getting talent on that show.  She revealed that they had a special guest there from one of those very shows.  Dan Benson, Zeke from Disney’s Wizards of Waverly Place, was there to talk about his start in the business and how great “model and talent” is at connecting kids with industry professionals.  Alice was so excited to see someone she recognized from the Disney Channel.  He entertained the crowd with amusing stories about his first minor parts and got the kids hopes up with how those tiny roles led to being Zeke.  He told us how his parents sacrificed so much to make his dream come true.  The whole seminar was professional, entertaining, and perfectly played out to condition you to think that you didn’t want to be the lame-o parents that held their super talented kid back by not taking advantage of this great opportunity.  It worked.  We bought it.  I mean, we already had proof that they had Disney connections and if their parents can move across the county or fly their kid to auditions then we could, at the very least, pay to have Alice on a website that all the TOP industry professionals use to find talent.

All of the kids were then lined into four rows where they were each interviewed and asked to perform their skits for one of the four judges.  Our judge’s name was Jonathan.  Alice did great and Jon was really impressed with the pictures in her modeling portfolio.  We were then told that the “select few” kids out of the 1000+ interviewed that day would be chosen to perform a second audition on Sunday.  We would be notified by phone between the hours of 5pm and Midnight that evening if Alice made the cut.  They were very direct and informed us that if we didn’t answer our phone or respond to their text within 15 minutes our child would lose their spot at the second audition.  After our audition, we saw Dan Benson on our way out of the hotel lobby.  He congratulated Alice on her first audition and took a picture with her.  We immediately uploaded the image to Instagram.  To our astonishment Dan reposted the picture with Alice on his Instagram and Twitter accounts and started following my account.  Our daughter got many followers because of it and it totally made her day.  We were so blinded by an actual Disney actor’s presence at the seminar and his sweet and encouraging interaction with our daughter that we didn’t even think to suspect the legitimacy of this company.  Which is exactly what “model and talent” wants to happen. EVIL GENIUS.  We went our merry way to Dragon*Con for a day of fun.  We set an alarm on our phone so that from 5pm-midnight we could make sure we had service and wouldn’t miss the call.  Unfortunately Dragon’Con mostly takes place in the deep bowels of many Atlanta hotels.  James (my husband) spent most of the evening sitting in lobbies with reception hoping for a phone call.  Lame.  Finally, we received a text at 10:50pm congratulating Alice for making the cut.  Her second audition was scheduled for 11:20 the next morning at the same hotel where we were told to bring back our brochure, more pictures, and Alice’s most recent report card (good grades are a must).  We excitedly commented on Dan’s Instagram repost thanking him for encouraging Alice and let him know that we’d received a call back.  Alice picked out her outfit and we all went to bed exhausted from all of the days excitement.

The next morning I took Alice to the second audition because James had to work. We arrived early and were given a second (longer) script for her to memorize.  There were only a few kids waiting and it appeared that each child was given a different audition time.  Alice spent the entire hour diligently memorizing and practicing her new script.  This time for Double Bubble.  While we were rehearsing one of the other judges stopped to tell Alice that she’d seen her picture on Dan’s Instagram.  Alice was, of course, excited about that.  We were called back a while after her appointment time to an empty room where she was interviewed separately from the other kids and judges.  Our Judge (Jonathan) was the same from the previous day.  He asked Alice to perform her skit many times in different attitudes.  He commended Alice on her performance and modeling photographs and congratulated her on being chosen to be represented by their company.  He then proceeded to tell us which membership package he recommended we sign up for.  Alice showed promise in both modeling and acting so the 6 month membership was recommended to us.  I asked many questions about the audition process and monthly payments.  Seeing my hesitancy, Jon offered to sponsor Alice for 50% of the 6 month package ($2900) if we paid our half ($1450) in full that day.  All we could afford on Sunday was the $833 initial payment for the 6 month membership but we could pay the remaining $617 on Tuesday after payday.  He agreed to let us split the payment so we could take advantage of the sponsorship.  He then told us that in order for us to get the $1450 sponsorship we’d have to sign a sponsorship rider saying we wouldn’t tell any other clients about the deal (because they might get sad that they didn’t get that offer - which made us feel even more special) AND sign a waiver of cancellation rights.  The cancellation deadline was only three days from signing and since we’d already been planning on signing her up waiving the three day cancellation time didn’t seem like a big deal.  He told Alice that her modeling was so good that she would be auditioning and booking jobs that week. 

We were so charmed by the celebrity endorsement and the interaction that Jonathan had with Alice that it honestly didn’t cross our mind that they wouldn’t deliver on their promises.  We went home and started to Google things in preparation for building her online profile that would be available on the following Thursday.  We knew we wouldn’t have access to the website until later that week, but we figured we’d still be able to find some of the actors and models that had been successful with “model and talent” bookings. That’s when the company name comes into play. You can’t Google “model and talent” (their all lowercase name) without pulling up thousands of companies and agencies in the business. The social media sites listed on the back of our brochure didn’t exist. We jokingly thought “what if we got scammed” and searched for casting audition scams. That’s when we found many warnings about a company called “CastingHub”, an online networking service giving kids exposure to the top talent agencies and casting directors.  I sent Dan Benson a direct message on Instagram asking him to verify that “model and talent” was a legit business.  While waiting and hoping for a reply we kept searching.  “CastingHub” sounded just like “model and talent” only parents weren’t getting results they were promised and claimed most auditions listed were at an additional cost.  After one parent called every talent agency listed in the “CastingHub” brochure represented as part of their network he discovered that not a single agency had heard of them.  We started reading the stories and discovered how similar their audition process was to what we’d been a part of.  Then we read about Dan Benson, and other teen actors of the same caliber, being at “CastingHub” auditions as far back as 2012.  We checked our bank account and saw the charge of $833 for MAT Entertainment, Inc (words you don’t see until you sign the contract). We knew that if they were actually incorporated we’d be able to find them listed. Sure enough, they were. Also listed was every other name their business went by, “CastingHub”, “Cast Hub”, “CASTINGHUB, INC” included.   We were devastated.  They had changed their company name in April 2014 after all of the negative publicity became so widespread.

Two hours after I sent my message, Dan replied saying “I would spend my money elsewhere.” (see screen cap above) HE KNEW!  Every victim (losing between $2000-6000) proclaimed that it was the presence of actual Disney actors that made them believe they were really going to have connections to top agents and casting directors.  While I appreciated Dan’s honesty, it was too late. Our money was gone.  Since we never actually received the sponsorship we figured that it would null and void the waiver. We called and emailed every contact we had for them and sent the cancellation agreement. No response for two days. On Tuesday they called to verify our information. We tried in vain to get our payment back since we were cancelling before the three day deadline, but they were unrelenting. When speaking to the customer service representatives it was clear that they had been trained to respond to unhappy customers. They know their business doesn’t deliver what they promise and are prepared with scripts to respond to your pleas.  When my husband calmly claimed that they had conned him into signing this form, the rep robotically replied “Due to the harassing nature of this phone call I’m going to go ahead and disconnect” and clicked off.  “model and talent / CastingHub” is shady and unethical. There’s no “scam” in charging a fee for an Internet listing service that posts casting calls but the almost universal review for this company is that the results aren’t what they say and they’re taking every step to keep you from finding that out before they take your money.

The financial impact was a big hit for us but compared to what many lost we seem to have been pretty lucky.  Money is only money and we can work hard and make more.  What we can’t undo is the damage that was inflicted on our daughter.  We had to sit our child (who already has trust issues from years of abuse from her birth family and broken promises from foster families) down and explain to her that all the hard work she put into her auditions this past weekend was a waste.  GROWN UPS and a DISNEY ACTOR she looked up to, knowingly took part in luring her into a trap that wouldn’t bring the results promised. A JUDGE SAT IN FRONT OF MY NINE-YEAR-OLD DAUGHTER, ASKED HER WHAT HER DREAMS WERE, THEN CLAIMED THEY’D BE COMING TRUE THE FOLLOWING WEEK.  She was lied to.  She was used.  She was promised amazing things and was super excited about all of the possibilities this company was going to offer her.  After we revealed to her that Dan knew this company wasn’t going to help her dreams come true, she couldn’t understand why he would make her think that they would.  She defended him and was sure he hadn’t known.  After we were finally able to make her understand she said; “I still like him. He was so nice to me. And I got a cool picture with him”.  She will like him anyway because that’s the power of a Disney reputation and the innocent belief of a child.  Which is exactly why they hire kid show actors to promote this shady company.  My belief though, you shouldn’t endorse a company that you know isn’t everything it claims to be.

We want to bring awareness to “model and talent” and their trickery.  We don’t want other families to go through what we did.  Most families that signed on Sunday don’t even know that they’re not going to get a return on their investment.  Please help us bring attention to this group of people that make their money off of the dreams of children and the parents that have faith in their abilities.  Their next audition is September 6, 2014 at the Jacksonville, Marriott in Jacksonville, Florida at 11:30 am.  I”m discouraged and I feel helpless not being able to do something to prevent others from being victims. I hope writing this will, at the very least, help “model and talent” to come up in a search other hopeful parent’s make.  I know it’s easy to read this and think that we’re complete gullible goons for falling for this and yes, hindsight is 20/20 but these people are smart, crafty, and cunning.  The production is top notch.  There are NO warnings under their new business name “model and talent” and it took us hours of searching using information we didn’t get until after we’d signed with them linking the two companies. They know exactly what to say to get you to do what they want and they don’t seem to care that the real victims in this are the kids they’ve deceived.  I honestly don’t know how these people live with themselves after manipulating hundreds of children into believing their dreams are about to come true.  It is the lowest of lows.  If you’d like to help please share our story and if you live in Florida let your friends know before Saturday.

Click here to see Alice’s reaction to this news and her Double Bubble audition she worked so hard on.

A PSA for anyone looking to buy costumes/props (or, really, pretty much anything, especially custom) online: PLEASE make sure the seller is legit.

This is a message a fan of mine received yesterday, who’s looking to commission someone for a Captain Marvel costume. Thankfully, she knew something was fishy before continuing forward with a transaction, and approached me about it. However, I’ve heard dozens of unfortunate horror stories of people who have given money to a seller, expecting a beautiful product, only to be swindled and be out of money, or receive an inferior product.

A legit seller should have a portfolio showing off what they have created. In a time where you can image search (http://tineye.com/) to find the origin of a photo, you should be able to find the owner of the image, or the person wearing the costume, to ask if the seller is legit AND if they were pleased with the interaction. Or, you could ask the seller to give some reference testimonials. One of these things should happen before you lay down a single penny, or you could just be waving goodbye to your hard-earned cash. Once you know the seller is legit, be sure to keep file of EVERYTHING in writing, just in case.

The Replica Prop Forum and the Superhero Costuming Forum also have threads of Blacklisted ‘sellers’, so please also check that out before making a transaction.

Since it bears repeating: I MAKE ALL MY OWN COSTUMES. If I don’t make an item (typically cowls), I will say so in the pic description and link to the person who did make the item. I have been making costumes for 12 years for theater, stage, and cosplay; this is my passion, my life, and my business. I will not tolerate people using my images to scam other people.

That said, yes, I do take commissions. However, my schedule is currently full. I will be re-opening commissions after NYCC, so be on the lookout, if you’re interested!

(NOTE: I am NOT looking for this man to be lynched. Please DO NOT harass him. I am ONLY leaving his name on here so people know to avoid him.)

Watch on redbloodedamerica.tumblr.com

I doubt there are many criminals out there wise enough to deploy this type of scam, but it is an interesting use of simple iPhone technology.

Because nothing says “hot” like “downloadable medicine”!

The 5 Most Misguided Uses of the Word ‘Quantum’ in Ads

#5. Quantum Sex Download

Looking at the QuantumMAN site, the aliens clearly crashed their technology into mid-’90s HTML, and neither survived the experience. Buying one-use Portal Access Keys (TM) connects your smartphone to their healing quantum teleportation portal and invalidates its adjective. I’ve played iPhone games with more believable premises. It’s the only Internet scam with a target market of zero, because they need someone stupid enough to fall for this bullshit but still capable of entering their money-card’s weird squiggles on the squeezy bits of their beepbox.

QuantumMAN(TM) claims the potential to revolutionize all human abilities, but is most excited to use it for sex.

Read More

you guys remember how i made a post about the store yeon-in right? i was actually asked to promote her store in exchange to get to review products later on when she “makes enough sales” which should’ve already been suspicious for me

i don’t accept all the offers i get because i often question the legitimacy of the stores (eg. rosewholesale, sammydress, banggood, dressale, multiple storenvys etc) and i wanted to avoid circumstances like this as much as possible… so when i started getting asks about people not receiving any information about their orders from yeon-in, and i got no reply when i sent an email asking about what was going on, it really upset me because the store owner seemed so nice and the store was so cute and cheap so i made the decision to share it with you guys but instead this happens /:

idk what else to say except that im so incredibly sorry for this mistake of mine because this is the second time it happened (first time was kpopseoulfashion and it was followed by this incident) idk this is all my fault and i should’ve listened to my bitch side and not my nice side bc i really hate it when my followers get taken advantage of adjgalkgj

what you can do is to report the store (the people i talked to already have) and if you’ve paid with paypal, open a dispute (contacting the seller about it) or make a claim (letting paypal decide)

once again im so incredibly sorry to anyone that didn’t receive their order and this whole situation makes me really upset so i don’t think im going to accept anymore (new) business offers from storenvy’s to make sure my followers don’t get scammed again ugh

Watch on kellyisnice.tumblr.com

Here’s the video of us telling Alice the sad news you read about in my previous post.  People suck.  (The story is also below.)

This is the ghastly true story of how my daughter, Alice, was manipulated by a greedy corporation and a Disney actor she admired.  On Friday we heard a radio ad on 96.1 asking for kids who want to be on Disney shows (like Jessie and Lab Rats) to audition.  Alice called with our permission and we were told a company called “model and talent” was having auditions last Saturday (August 30, 2014) at a nice Atlanta hotel.  They emailed us a short script (Raisin Bran) for Alice to memorize and perform at the audition. 

When we arrived at the hotel we found about 100 kids waiting to audition.  We were given an application to complete and directed to the ballroom.  Each parent had to hold up their ID and pause before a tablet while they filmed before we were ushered into our seats. Afterward we were told this was a security precaution in case one of our kids got lost in the hotel and they could use the picture to locate them quickly. An authoritative lady, clad in black (with a haircut just like Alice’s to my great pleasure) began the presentation.  She revealed that every person we interacted with (getting our application from, showing ID to, etc.) was also a judge (who were also models from brands we’d all heard of) and that our audition began the minute we walked through the lobby door.  She began conditioning us to know that our kids would only be successful in this business if their parents were cooperative and willing to make sacrifices.  She told us how her parents would fly her across continents every two weeks for auditions and how that made it possible for her to get work.  She began to tell us how “model and talent”, a commercial networking service, makes it possible to get exposure to the top talent agencies and casting directors in the country.  She informed us that their website is exclusive and that about only 25 of the many kids sitting in that room would make the first cut.  She involved the kids in the entire process.  She would name a Disney show and ask the kids to raise their hands if they’d heard of it.  They all raised their hands, and to their delight they were told that “model and talent” was responsible for getting talent on that show.  She revealed that they had a special guest there from one of those very shows.  Dan Benson, Zeke from Disney’s Wizards of Waverly Place, was there to talk about his start in the business and how great “model and talent” is at connecting kids with industry professionals.  Alice was so excited to see someone she recognized from the Disney Channel.  He entertained the crowd with amusing stories about his first minor parts and got the kids hopes up with how those tiny roles led to being Zeke.  He told us how his parents sacrificed so much to make his dream come true.  The whole seminar was professional, entertaining, and perfectly played out to condition you to think that you didn’t want to be the lame-o parents that held their super talented kid back by not taking advantage of this great opportunity.  It worked.  We bought it.  I mean, we already had proof that they had Disney connections and if their parents can move across the county or fly their kid to auditions then we could, at the very least, pay to have Alice on a website that all the TOP industry professionals use to find talent.

All of the kids were then lined into four rows where they were each interviewed and asked to perform their skits for one of the four judges.  Our judge’s name was Jonathan.  Alice did great and Jon was really impressed with the pictures in her modeling portfolio.  We were then told that the “select few” kids out of the 1000+ interviewed that day would be chosen to perform a second audition on Sunday.  We would be notified by phone between the hours of 5pm and Midnight that evening if Alice made the cut.  They were very direct and informed us that if we didn’t answer our phone or respond to their text within 15 minutes our child would lose their spot at the second audition.  After our audition, we saw Dan Benson on our way out of the hotel lobby.  He congratulated Alice on her first audition and took a picture with her.  We immediately uploaded the image to Instagram.  To our astonishment Dan reposted the picture with Alice on his Instagram and Twitter accounts and started following my account.  Our daughter got many followers because of it and it totally made her day.  We were so blinded by an actual Disney actor’s presence at the seminar and his sweet and encouraging interaction with our daughter that we didn’t even think to suspect the legitimacy of this company.  Which is exactly what “model and talent” wants to happen. EVIL GENIUS.  We went our merry way to Dragon*Con for a day of fun.  We set an alarm on our phone so that from 5pm-midnight we could make sure we had service and wouldn’t miss the call.  Unfortunately Dragon’Con mostly takes place in the deep bowels of many Atlanta hotels.  James (my husband) spent most of the evening sitting in lobbies with reception hoping for a phone call.  Lame.  Finally, we received a text at 10:50pm congratulating Alice for making the cut.  Her second audition was scheduled for 11:20 the next morning at the same hotel where we were told to bring back our brochure, more pictures, and Alice’s most recent report card (good grades are a must).  We excitedly commented on Dan’s Instagram repost thanking him for encouraging Alice and let him know that we’d received a call back.  Alice picked out her outfit and we all went to bed exhausted from all of the days excitement.

The next morning I took Alice to the second audition because James had to work. We arrived early and were given a second (longer) script for her to memorize.  There were only a few kids waiting and it appeared that each child was given a different audition time.  Alice spent the entire hour diligently memorizing and practicing her new script.  This time for Double Bubble.  While we were rehearsing one of the other judges stopped to tell Alice that she’d seen her picture on Dan’s Instagram.  Alice was, of course, excited about that.  We were called back a while after her appointment time to an empty room where she was interviewed separately from the other kids and judges.  Our Judge (Jonathan) was the same from the previous day.  He asked Alice to perform her skit many times in different attitudes.  He commended Alice on her performance and modeling photographs and congratulated her on being chosen to be represented by their company.  He then proceeded to tell us which membership package he recommended we sign up for.  Alice showed promise in both modeling and acting so the 6 month membership was recommended to us.  I asked many questions about the audition process and monthly payments.  Seeing my hesitancy, Jon offered to sponsor Alice for 50% of the 6 month package ($2900) if we paid our half ($1450) in full that day.  All we could afford on Sunday was the $833 initial payment for the 6 month membership but we could pay the remaining $617 on Tuesday after payday.  He agreed to let us split the payment so we could take advantage of the sponsorship.  He then told us that in order for us to get the $1450 sponsorship we’d have to sign a sponsorship rider saying we wouldn’t tell any other clients about the deal (because they might get sad that they didn’t get that offer - which made us feel even more special) AND sign a waiver of cancellation rights.  The cancellation deadline was only three days from signing and since we’d already been planning on signing her up waiving the three day cancellation time didn’t seem like a big deal.  He told Alice that her modeling was so good that she would be auditioning and booking jobs that week. 

We were so charmed by the celebrity endorsement and the interaction that Jonathan had with Alice that it honestly didn’t cross our mind that they wouldn’t deliver on their promises.  We went home and started to Google things in preparation for building her online profile that would be available on the following Thursday.  We knew we wouldn’t have access to the website until later that week, but we figured we’d still be able to find some of the actors and models that had been successful with “model and talent” bookings. That’s when the company name comes into play. You can’t Google “model and talent” (their all lowercase name) without pulling up thousands of companies and agencies in the business. The social media sites listed on the back of our brochure didn’t exist. We jokingly thought “what if we got scammed” and searched for casting audition scams. That’s when we found many warnings about a company called “CastingHub”, an online networking service giving kids exposure to the top talent agencies and casting directors.  I sent Dan Benson a direct message on Instagram asking him to verify that “model and talent” was a legit business.  While waiting and hoping for a reply we kept searching.  “CastingHub” sounded just like “model and talent” only parents weren’t getting results they were promised and claimed most auditions listed were at an additional cost.  After one parent called every talent agency listed in the “CastingHub” brochure represented as part of their network he discovered that not a single agency had heard of them.  We started reading the stories and discovered how similar their audition process was to what we’d been a part of.  Then we read about Dan Benson, and other teen actors of the same caliber, being at “CastingHub” auditions as far back as 2012.  We checked our bank account and saw the charge of $833 for MAT Entertainment, Inc (words you don’t see until you sign the contract). We knew that if they were actually incorporated we’d be able to find them listed. Sure enough, they were. Also listed was every other name their business went by, “CastingHub”, “Cast Hub”, “CASTINGHUB, INC” included.   We were devastated.  They had changed their company name in April 2014 after all of the negative publicity became so widespread.

Two hours after I sent my message, Dan replied saying “I would spend my money elsewhere.” (see screen cap above) HE KNEW!  Every victim (losing between $2000-6000) proclaimed that it was the presence of actual Disney actors that made them believe they were really going to have connections to top agents and casting directors.  While I appreciated Dan’s honesty, it was too late. Our money was gone.  Since we never actually received the sponsorship we figured that it would null and void the waiver. We called and emailed every contact we had for them and sent the cancellation agreement. No response for two days. On Tuesday they called to verify our information. We tried in vain to get our payment back since we were cancelling before the three day deadline, but they were unrelenting. When speaking to the customer service representatives it was clear that they had been trained to respond to unhappy customers. They know their business doesn’t deliver what they promise and are prepared with scripts to respond to your pleas.  When my husband calmly claimed that they had conned him into signing this form, the rep robotically replied “Due to the harassing nature of this phone call I’m going to go ahead and disconnect” and clicked off.  “model and talent / CastingHub” is shady and unethical. There’s no “scam” in charging a fee for an Internet listing service that posts casting calls but the almost universal review for this company is that the results aren’t what they say and they’re taking every step to keep you from finding that out before they take your money.

The financial impact was a big hit for us but compared to what many lost we seem to have been pretty lucky.  Money is only money and we can work hard and make more.  What we can’t undo is the damage that was inflicted on our daughter.  We had to sit our child (who already has trust issues from years of abuse from her birth family and broken promises from foster families) down and explain to her that all the hard work she put into her auditions this past weekend was a waste.  GROWN UPS and a DISNEY ACTOR she looked up to, knowingly took part in luring her into a trap that wouldn’t bring the results promised. A JUDGE SAT IN FRONT OF MY NINE-YEAR-OLD DAUGHTER, ASKED HER WHAT HER DREAMS WERE, THEN CLAIMED THEY’D BE COMING TRUE THE FOLLOWING WEEK.  She was lied to.  She was used.  She was promised amazing things and was super excited about all of the possibilities this company was going to offer her.  After we revealed to her that Dan knew this company wasn’t going to help her dreams come true, she couldn’t understand why he would make her think that they would.  She defended him and was sure he hadn’t known.  After we were finally able to make her understand she said; “I still like him. He was so nice to me. And I got a cool picture with him”.  She will like him anyway because that’s the power of a Disney reputation and the innocent belief of a child.  Which is exactly why they hire kid show actors to promote this shady company.  My belief though, you shouldn’t endorse a company that you know isn’t everything it claims to be.

We want to bring awareness to “model and talent” and their trickery.  We don’t want other families to go through what we did.  Most families that signed on Sunday don’t even know that they’re not going to get a return on their investment.  Please help us bring attention to this group of people that make their money off of the dreams of children and the parents that have faith in their abilities.  Their next audition is September 6, 2014 at the Jacksonville, Marriott in Jacksonville, Florida at 11:30 am.  I”m discouraged and I feel helpless not being able to do something to prevent others from being victims. I hope writing this will, at the very least, help “model and talent” to come up in a search other hopeful parent’s make.  I know it’s easy to read this and think that we’re complete gullible goons for falling for this and yes, hindsight is 20/20 but these people are smart, crafty, and cunning.  The production is top notch.  There are NO warnings under their new business name “model and talent” and it took us hours of searching using information we didn’t get until after we’d signed with them linking the two companies. They know exactly what to say to get you to do what they want and they don’t seem to care that the real victims in this are the kids they’ve deceived.  I honestly don’t know how these people live with themselves after manipulating hundreds of children into believing their dreams are about to come true.  It is the lowest of lows.  If you’d like to help please share our story and if you live in Florida let your friends know before Saturday.

Imposter. Con man. Rip-off artist. Sham. They’re all words for those who faking it is an occupation. Some of the phonies on this list are fictional, while some come straight from real life. Whether you’re interested in teasing out the differences between appearances and reality or you just like a good thriller, our favorite scam stories will make you look at charming strangers in a whole new light. 

So I was contacted by WeLoveFine to submit my Rocket and Groot art into their contest and

image

That’s never going to happen. I know full well how they rip off artists by cashing in on their designs. Seriously, don’t enter their contests. It’s just a scam for them to have a popular design and only pay an artist $200 while they easily pocket 10x that amount. You don’t even have the rights to the design anymore.

2

I’m always extremely skeptical when it comes to messages such as these. Apart from the obvious grammar mistakes and the ‘Go to my BLOG TO PLAY’ which are clear signs that this blog is a scam, i looked it up and it’s only 4 days old.

My advice is to NOT CLICK TO GO ON THEIR BLOG since it could probably give you some kind of virus and instead just block the blog and live happily virus-free after.

Did anyone else get an email like this? @shanevang and I both got one and I’m almost 100% certain it is a scam! We both got one at the same time which is very fishy. It asks for account info and personal info. @shanevang downloaded the program it asks you to download and it broke her computer… #youtube #scam #yt #help

To those intending to buy Destiny pre-orders off eBay:

It’s really disappointing I’m not able to leave feedback after purchasing what I was led to believe was a Destiny Ghost Edition on eBay. After being denied a refund from the seller and eBay, I just thought I would leave a review here, also so I can have closure with the whole experience. 

  • tejada_diaz_solutions_llc is the seller, of what I was led to believe was the Destiny’s Ghost Edition for the PS4. After messaging them asking if I would receive the actual game, and after receiving a reply from them saying “Yes I do have available for the PS4”, I was affirmed that I would be getting the actual game. Me being naive, didn’t ask for a receipt proving they had a pre-order purchase. When I asked if the copy I intended to buy was available for the PS4, they said yes, when they should have told me that they were selling a guide, yes, a 3 page, Mircosoft Word printed guide, for steps on obtaining the pre-ordered game.. for around $200. I would have never, ever, bought a guide for how to obtain this pre-order. I am fully aware, that the Ghost Edition and the Limited Edition is sold out at any known location. I am also fully aware that the title of the seller’s advertisement was for a Guide, which is why I made the effort to message them and get clarification as to what he was really selling and if it was in fact the actual game. eBay customer support has made a final decision and the case has been closed, but I made an appeal, hoping that they can see I did not get the item I was led to believe would be sent to me. I have no idea if I should do anything else to try to solve this or for me to even get a refund. Since I purchased this “guide”, I noticed that eBay took the listing down, or flagged it for lack of better knowledge as to how it was taken down, but it has since been taken down.

So, all in all, I just want everyone to be reminded that when purchasing items on eBay, make sure 100% that what you are buying, is in fact what you are buying. Learn from my mistake, and don’t be afraid to contact the seller, ask questions, be specific, and if something doesn’t feel right, then don’t buy the item. I am not sure what will happen after my appeal, but either way I am hoping this doesn’t happen to anyone else, especially those looking to get their hands on a Ghost Edition or Limited Edition on eBay. Lastly, I have purchased a separate Ghost Edition, and this time, I was able to get not only a response from the seller right away, but proof (an attachment .jpg) to my email’s inbox that they indeed had purchased a pre-ordered Ghost Edition. So, not everyone on eBay is out to scam you or to trick you into buying something you didn’t want to get, it’s just that you have to be aware of everything: the terms and conditions of the sale (refundable or not) and if the item is covered under eBay’s Money Back Guarantee. 

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