Falling
  • Falling
  • Nitin Sawhney
  • Human
Play

How do you fall in love?

You don’t fall in love like you fall in a hole. You fall like falling through space. It’s like you jump off your own private planet to visit someone else’s planet. And when you get there it all looks different: the flowers, the animals, the colours people wear. It is a big surprise falling in love because you thought you had everything just right on your own planet, and that was true, in a way, but then somebody signalled to you across space and the only way you could visit was to take a giant jump. Away you go, falling into someone else’s orbit and after a while you might decide to pull your two planets together and call it home. And you can bring your dog. Or your cat. Your goldfish, hamster, collection of stones, all your odd socks. (The ones you lost, including the holes, are on the new planet you found.)

And you can bring your friends to visit. And read your favourite stories to each other. And the falling was really the big jump that you had to make to be with someone you don’t want to be without. That’s it.

PS You have to be brave.

Jeanette Winterson in Big Questions from Little People & Simple Answers from Great Minds

Song: “Falling” by Nitin Sawhney

iTunes :: Amazon

George Harrison and Indian musicians at EMI Studios, January 1968. Photo copyright Harrison Family, screen capped from the Wonderwall Music promotional video.

"[A]s a standalone vision it embraces a glorious multiverse of sonorous vignettes like nothing I’ve ever heard. It speaks of a fearless heart.

George Harrison was a very special man. Pandit-ji Ravi Shankar, the late legendary sitarist who mentored Harrison’s musical explorations of the Indian classical world, once told me that himself… In this album you can hear why the great maestro held that belief. […]

I once was privileged to find myself sitting next to George Harrison at a performance in London by the incredible virtuoso U. Srinivas. His unswerving attention to the South Indian musician was almost tangible. We both meandered backstage afterwards to pay out respects. George was such an elegant man - tall, slim, distinguished and generous in his praise of Srinivas. As we shared the green room backstage I caught his eye and he smiled warmly - a tiny, very special moment for me. In many of the tracks of Wonderwall Music I can still see that same smile. It radiated from a really good place. I felt that strongly. There was an effortless focus about him.

That same focus was in all his creativity but in this timeless album, George gives us more than music… He gifts us with his stunning, restless and infinitely inventive imagination.” - From “An Introduction” by Nitin Sawhney, Wonderwall Music 2014 remaster

"I decided to do it as a mini-anthology of Indian music, because I wanted to help turn the public on to Indian music." - George Harrison

"Mr. Bhaskar Menon brought a two-track tape machine all the way from Calcutta on the train for me, because all they had in Bombay at that time was a mono machine - the same kind we used in Abbey Road to do the ‘Paperback Writer’ [tape]-echo. It was fantastic really. The studio is on top of offices, but there’s no soundproofing. Every time the offices knocked off at 5.30, we had to stop recording because you could just hear everybody stomping down the steps. I mixed everything there as we did it and that was nice enough because you get spoiled working on [multi]-tracks." - George Harrison, Wonderwall Music liner notes

"In order to ensure Joe Massot [the director of Wonderwall] received music that was emotionally suitable for each scene and also the correct length, George regularly visited Twickenham Film Studios during the editing process. ‘I had a wind-up stopwatch and I viewed the film to “spot-in” the music with the watch. I wrote the timings down in my book then I’d make up a piece, record it and when we’d synch it hop at Twickenham, it always worked. It was always right.” - Wonderwall Music 2014 remaster liner notes

My Soul (feat. Paul Mccartney)
  • My Soul (feat. Paul Mccartney)
  • Nitin Sawhney
  • London Undersound
Play

A Valediction: Forbidding Mourning

As virtuous men pass mildly away,
And whisper to their souls to go,
Whilst some of their sad friends do say,
“The breath goes now,” and some say, “No,”

So let us melt, and make no noise,
No tear-floods, nor sigh-tempests move;
'Twere profanation of our joys
To tell the laity our love.

Moving of the earth brings harms and fears,
Men reckon what it did and meant;
But trepidation of the spheres,
Though greater far, is innocent.

Dull sublunary lovers’ love
(Whose soul is sense) cannot admit
Absence, because it doth remove
Those things which elemented it.

But we, by a love so much refined
That our selves know not what it is,
Inter-assured of the mind,
Care less, eyes, lips, and hands to miss.

Our two souls therefore, which are one,
Though I must go, endure not yet
A breach, but an expansion.
Like gold to airy thinness beat.

If they be two, they are two so
As stiff twin compasses are two:
Thy soul, the fixed foot, makes no show
To move, but doth, if the other do;

And though it in the center sit,
Yet when the other far doth roam,
It leans, and hearkens after it,
And grows erect, as that comes home.

Such wilt thou be to me, who must,
Like the other foot, obliquely run;
Thy firmness makes my circle just,
And makes me end where I begun.

John Donne in The Poems of John Donne, Volume 1

Song: “My Soul” by Nitin Sawhney (ft. Paul McCartney)

iTunes :: Amazon :: Back to Brain Pickings

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Nitin Sawhney - I Ask You ft. Joss Stone

[A]s a standalone vision it embraces a glorious multiverse of sonorous vignettes like nothing I’ve ever heard. It speaks of a fearless heart.

George Harrison was a very special man. Pandit-ji Ravi Shankar, the late legendary sitarist who mentored Harrison’s musical explorations of the Indian classical world, once told me that himself… In this album you can hear why the great maestro held that belief. […]

I once was privileged to find myself sitting next to George Harrison at a performance in London by the incredible virtuoso U. Srinivas. His unswerving attention to the South Indian musician was almost tangible. We both meandered backstage afterwards to pay out respects. George was such an elegant man - tall, slim, distinguished and generous in his praise of Srinivas. As we shared the green room backstage I caught his eye and he smiled warmly - a tiny, very special moment for me. In many of the tracks of Wonderwall Music I can still see that same smile. It radiated from a really good place. I felt that strongly. There was an effortless focus about him.

That same focus was in all his creativity but in this timeless album, George gives us more than music… He gifts us with his stunning, restless and infinitely inventive imagination.

—  From “An Introduction” by Nitin Sawhney, Wonderwall Music 2014 remaster
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Excuse Me Girl - Ambarsariya by Arjun ft. Reality Raj & Rekha Sawhney | T-SERIES
Chetan Jeevan (Conscious Life)
  • Chetan Jeevan (Conscious Life)
  • Nitin Sawhney
  • Human
Play

I learned about life

from life itself,

love I learned in a single kiss

and could teach no one anything

except that I have lived

with something in common among men,

when fighting with them,

when saying all their say in my song.

Pablo Neruda (July 12, 1904—September 23, 1973) in "Ode to the Book," found in Selected Poems

Song: “Chetan Jeevan (Conscious Life)” by Nitin Sawhney

iTunes :: Amazon :: Back to Brain Pickings

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“Shad is one of the most important artists alive today. This man is truth.” -DJ NDN, Tribe Called Red

The still image here is New Orleans. That’s just part of this. We are 9 years after Katrina and my brother Shad put out a song where he talks about the Superdome. Can’t forget. Puts Africville in his video. Puts the word Patriarchy in his video. Puts a lot in there. 

Justin Broadbent puts it out there, 2014 style, looking at the past and recent history.
Via Gaurav Sawhney & Deejay Ndn & Shad & all of you. I see you sharing.
I just watched this on the big TV with the good speakers. Watch it on your laptop if you want. Take care. It’s a tough one. 

"The death of music is similar to the death of visual art. The online, numb, browsing experience has (naturally) started to effect the current state of art. We’ve become a Tumblr’d culture, over Googled, educated and bored in 4 seconds or shorter. I made a non-music video for Shad’s “Progress”. It’s a website. It’s a comment on the state of art and also maybe the only video that could attach to such an intensely accurate and poignant song for our generation. It is like the movie credits to now. Tumblr on.”

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