satellite-truck

Ericsson compression entrusted to power production of Mayweather-Pacquiao boxing match
2015-05-05 Categories: Industry
  • Ericsson solutions supported Floyd Mayweather v Manny Pacquiao boxing match, reportedly the largest pay-per-view event in the history of television
  • PSSI Global Services extends two decade relationship with Ericsson with deployment of AVP 3000 Voyager Video Processors and RX8200 Advanced Modular Receivers
  • Ericsson support team ensured high quality output was delivered to millions of viewers worldwide

Ericsson today announced that it was selected to provide an additional level of support for PSSI Global Services, LLC (also dba Strategic Television) and its on-site satellite truck content delivery of the boxing match between Floyd Mayweather and Manny Pacquiao on May 2nd 2015. The installation comprises 13 PSSI fully operational satellite trucks, which were equipped with Ericsson’s AVP 3000 Voyager Video Processors and RX8200 Advanced Modular Receivers. Ericsson also provided a team of expert satellite production support engineers to assist with the installation of equipment, maintenance and troubleshooting during the broadcast.

Robert Lamb, CEO, PSSI Global Services, says: “This match proved to be one of the great sporting events of the decade, so we are extremely proud that our industry-leading DSNG (Digital Satellite News Gathering) trucks played an instrumental role in delivering video footage to millions of viewers worldwide. Based on our 20 year relationship with Ericsson, we know its technology provides the necessary quality and consistency to help us deliver the best possible experience to high-level broadcasters, content providers and ultimately consumers.”

The Ericsson AVP 3000 Voyager is a market leading DSNG platform designed for live news, sports and entertainment, delivering multi-codec, multi-format and multi-channel operations that meet the demands of today’s TV Anywhere audience. Offering high performance, scalability and efficiency, the platform includes a hot-swappable modular architecture that supports MPEG-2, MPEG-4 AVC and JPEG 2000 video compression over satellite and IP networks. In addition, the Ericsson RX8200 receivers offer ultimate operational flexibility by providing the capability to decode all video formats and connectivity for all transmission mediums.

Dr. Giles Wilson, Head of TV Compression, Ericsson, says: “We are delighted to again have partnered with and supported PSSI for this marquee encounter between two of the biggest names in boxing, which is likely to become the largest pay-per-view television event of all time. The combination of our renowned compression and transmission expertise for ultimate performance, with our direct services and support, ensures that Ericsson delivers upon its pedigree as the leader in live video. Ericsson has delivered on-site support for many prestigious events in the past and this is another example of how we offer the right expertise and resources to our customers for any event, in any location.”

Ericsson is a market leader in linear content acquisition, exchange and distribution and draws upon a strong compression heritage to deliver high performance, high quality video to service providers, content owners and broadcasters worldwide. The company’s encoding solutions have been used by major broadcasters during a number of recent high profile sporting events including the 2014 Winter Olympic Games in Sochi, the 2012 Summer Olympic Games in London and the 2014 FIFA World Cup in Brazil.

Notes to editors

Download high-resolution photos and broadcast-quality video at http://ift.tt/19y0776

Ericsson is the driving force behind the Networked Society – a world leader in communications technology and services. Our long-term relationships with every major telecom operator in the world allow people, businesses and societies to fulfill their potential and create a more sustainable future.

Our services, software and infrastructure – especially in mobility, broadband and the cloud – are enabling the telecom industry and other sectors to do better business, increase efficiency, improve the user experience and capture new opportunities.

With approximately 115,000 professionals and customers in 180 countries, we combine global scale with technology and services leadership. We support networks that connect more than 2.5 billion subscribers. Forty percent of the world’s mobile traffic is carried over Ericsson networks. And our investments in research and development ensure that our solutions – and our customers – stay in front.

Founded in 1876, Ericsson has its headquarters in Stockholm, Sweden. Net sales in 2014 were SEK 228.0 billion (USD 33.1 billion). Ericsson is listed on NASDAQ OMX stock exchange in Stockholm and the NASDAQ in New York.

For further information, please contact

Tags

TV, video, media



from Ericsson News Center http://ift.tt/1R9jRr4
The Latest: Holmes' attorney plans to show graphic images

10:30 a.m. (MDT)

Opening statements in the Colorado shooting trial will be given by District Attorney George Brauchler for the prosecution, and public defenders Daniel King and Katherine Spengler for the defense.

Brauchler said at the morning briefing that he’ll show graphic images during his presentation. He didn’t elaborate.

The trial is taking place in the Denver suburb of Centennial, where it was chilly and drizzling Monday morning.

A row of TV satellite trucks sat outside the courthouse. A half-dozen TV camera crews and more photojournalists watched as spectators including former Denver Fire Chief Larry Trujillo arrived.

Trujillo’s daughter, Taylor, was in the theater on July 20, 2012. She survived the shooting when a friend threw her to the floor.

Trujillo says his faith allows him to forgive. But he says that might be easy to say since his daughter survived.

___

9:55 a.m. (MDT)

Court is in recess in the Colorado theater shooting case after a hearing to clear up last-minute requests.

James Holmes’ parents sat in the second row in the courtroom in the Denver suburb of Centennial. His mother, Arlene, took notes in a small purple notebook and Holmes read at the defense table. No victims’ families were at the hearing.

Prosecutors asked for access to records of jail visits by Holmes’ parents, experts and other people besides his legal team.

Holmes’ lawyers objected, but arguments on that issue were delayed until a later date.

Opening statements are expected to begin around 1 p.m. local time, after the judge addresses jurors.

___

9:10 a.m. (MDT)

A hearing to take care of last-minute motions is underway in the death penalty trial of Colorado theater shooter James Holmes in suburban Denver.

Holmes is dressed in a blue shirt, khaki pants and no tie. At the start of a live video feed from the courtroom, he is seen standing behind the defense table with his hands in his pocket.

As in previous hearings, Holmes is tethered to the courtroom floor with a harness under his clothes, hidden from the jury’s view.

To the right of the judge’s bench is a table holding a roughly 4-foot by 6-foot object draped with a black cloth.

Among the evidence expected to be presented during the trial is an FBI model of the theater and photographs of the scene.

___

8:25 a.m. (MDT)

The parents of Colorado theater shooter James Holmes have been seen waiting in line to get into the suburban Denver courthouse where Holmes’ long-awaited death penalty trial is getting underway.

Robert and Arlene Holmes of Rancho Penasquitos, California, have publicly pleaded for their son’s life to be spared through a plea bargain. They called him a “human being gripped by a severe mental illness.”

Shortly before their arrival, some TV reporters followed Lonnie and Sandy Phillips, the parents of shooting victim Jessica Ghawi, to the door of the Centennial courthouse, in violation of the strict ground rules for media coverage.

A woman in a suit came up and scolded them.

Opening statements in the 2012 shooting case are scheduled to begin Monday afternoon.

___

7:50 a.m. (MDT)

A steady stream of people walked into the courthouse on a gray and drizzly morning on the opening day of the trial of James Holmes in the 2012 Colorado theater shooting.

They were dressed in suits and dresses, and jeans and sweatshirts. About 10 television satellite trucks were parked outside.

There were no deputies stationed at the roof as seen at previous hearings in the case at the courthouse in Centennial, south of Denver.

Holmes acknowledges killing 12 people and wounding 70 more a packed Aurora theater, but has pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity. His lawyers will argue he was too addled by mental illness to tell right from wrong.

Looking for a culinary and back of the house opportunity? Coppersmith is now accepting applications for Exec Sous and PM Sous positions. Position: Executive Sous Chef

Restaurant: Coppersmith

Coppersmith - a dynamic, game-changing neighborhood restaurant and cafe located on the cusp of the Seaport and Fort Point districts, and nestled in between the Broadway and St. Vincent’s communities is set to open in May and accepting applications for an
Executive Sous Chef.

The Executive Sous will report directly to the Executive Chef, and will assist in overseeing all aspects of culinary operations that includes a cafe, two satellite food truck kitchens, events, catering and a rooftop raw bar.

About Coppersmith:
Coppersmith strives to be a first-of-its-kind neighborhood restaurant and third-space. With the development of several community outreach programs and social initiatives, a focus on local sourcing and sustainability; we strive to truly make a difference for the better in our local communities.

The food at Coppersmith will focus on utilizing local ingredients, prepared simply but thoughtfully, and with a global inspiration. We will strive to deliver cuisine that guests of the restaurant and residents of the neighborhoods will truly enjoy. While the techniques used in the kitchen will be largely drawn from Executive Chef Chris Henry’s fine dining background, the food on the plate will be recognizable, approachable and - most importantly - delicious.

The Executive Sous Chef will play a large role in the managing of the kitchen operations on a day-to-day basis, and as such applicants should have a solid background in kitchen management, preferably in high volume operations and from-scratch kitchens.

Pay is very competitive and commensurate with experience.

To apply, please email Chef Chris directly at Chris@CoppersmithBoston.com

The Latest: Holmes' attorney plans to show graphic images

10:30 a.m. (MDT)

Opening statements in the Colorado shooting trial will be given by District Attorney George Brauchler for the prosecution, and public defenders Daniel King and Katherine Spengler for the defense.

Brauchler said at the morning briefing that he’ll show graphic images during his presentation. He didn’t elaborate.

The trial is taking place in the Denver suburb of Centennial, where it was chilly and drizzling Monday morning.

A row of TV satellite trucks sat outside the courthouse. A half-dozen TV camera crews and more photojournalists watched as spectators including former Denver Fire Chief Larry Trujillo arrived.

Trujillo’s daughter, Taylor, was in the theater on July 20, 2012. She survived the shooting when a friend threw her to the floor.

Trujillo says his faith allows him to forgive. But he says that might be easy to say since his daughter survived.

___

9:55 a.m. (MDT)

Court is in recess in the Colorado theater shooting case after a hearing to clear up last-minute requests.

James Holmes’ parents sat in the second row in the courtroom in the Denver suburb of Centennial. His mother, Arlene, took notes in a small purple notebook and Holmes read at the defense table. No victims’ families were at the hearing.

Prosecutors asked for access to records of jail visits by Holmes’ parents, experts and other people besides his legal team.

Holmes’ lawyers objected, but arguments on that issue were delayed until a later date.

Opening statements are expected to begin around 1 p.m. local time, after the judge addresses jurors.

___

9:10 a.m. (MDT)

A hearing to take care of last-minute motions is underway in the death penalty trial of Colorado theater shooter James Holmes in suburban Denver.

Holmes is dressed in a blue shirt, khaki pants and no tie. At the start of a live video feed from the courtroom, he is seen standing behind the defense table with his hands in his pocket.

As in previous hearings, Holmes is tethered to the courtroom floor with a harness under his clothes, hidden from the jury’s view.

To the right of the judge’s bench is a table holding a roughly 4-foot by 6-foot object draped with a black cloth.

Among the evidence expected to be presented during the trial is an FBI model of the theater and photographs of the scene.

___

8:25 a.m. (MDT)

The parents of Colorado theater shooter James Holmes have been seen waiting in line to get into the suburban Denver courthouse where Holmes’ long-awaited death penalty trial is getting underway.

Robert and Arlene Holmes of Rancho Penasquitos, California, have publicly pleaded for their son’s life to be spared through a plea bargain. They called him a “human being gripped by a severe mental illness.”

Shortly before their arrival, some TV reporters followed Lonnie and Sandy Phillips, the parents of shooting victim Jessica Ghawi, to the door of the Centennial courthouse, in violation of the strict ground rules for media coverage.

A woman in a suit came up and scolded them.

Opening statements in the 2012 shooting case are scheduled to begin Monday afternoon.

___

7:50 a.m. (MDT)

A steady stream of people walked into the courthouse on a gray and drizzly morning on the opening day of the trial of James Holmes in the 2012 Colorado theater shooting.

They were dressed in suits and dresses, and jeans and sweatshirts. About 10 television satellite trucks were parked outside.

There were no deputies stationed at the roof as seen at previous hearings in the case at the courthouse in Centennial, south of Denver.

Holmes acknowledges killing 12 people and wounding 70 more a packed Aurora theater, but has pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity. His lawyers will argue he was too addled by mental illness to tell right from wrong.