The Australian garage rock band Jet is comprised of Cameron Muncey (guitar/vocals), brothers Chris Cester(drums) and Nic Cester (guitar/vocals), and Mark Wilson (bass). Hailing from Melbourne and with dreams of making it big, the foursome formed just as the new millennium was beginning. They quickly self-released the Dirty Sweet EP in 2002. The vinyl-only album, which was limited to 1,000 pressings, was an instant hit down under. Once they pressed 1,000 more, Jet was being touted in the U.K. An American deal with Elektra surfaced in early 2003 and the Dirty Sweet EP was released domestically in May. An opening slot for the Rolling Stones in Jet's homeland soon followed. The band's proper studio full-length, Get Born, appeared in November. 

4

Early in their career, Buffalo natives the Goo Goo Dolls were frequently dismissed by critics as mere imitators of the Replacements; however, they refined and mainstreamed their sound enough to become one of the most popular adult alternative rock bands of the latter half of the ’90s, selling millions of records to audiences largely unfamiliar with their inspirations. That’s no knock on the band, either — the music simply improved in craft and accessibility as the years progressed, and radio happened to be receptive to what a decade earlier would have been considered collegiate power pop. Thus, the band landed two huge hits with the acoustic ballads “Name" and "Iris.”

Read More

2

Nazareth is a Scottish four-piece most famous for its classic rock rendition of Love Hurts. It is widely regarded that the band were true trailblazers of Scottish rock and on-stage fashion.

Formed in 1968, the band consisted of vocalist Dan McCafferty, guitarist Manny Charlton, bassist Pete Agnew, and drummer Darrell Sweet. It released three albums in 1971, 1972 and 1973 with the latter named Razamanaz that entered the top ten in the UK.

In 1975, the band released its most successful album titled Hair of the Dog which sold over 1 million copies in the United States and propelled them into international hard rock stardom.

Read More

4

Jeff Beck was an extremely talented guitarist, who having playing with several less auspicious bands joined The Yardbirds replacing Eric Clapton in 1965. Unfortunately, his experience with The Yardbirds was marred by paranoia and eventually he walked out of the band during a tour of America. Jimmy Page by this time had joined the group as an additional guitarist. Mickey Most took over the management of Jeff Beck and he continued to work with major bands eventually forming The Jeff Beck Group. Interestingly, prior to forming the group he recorded a single “Hi Ho Silver Lining” which is still a party favourite even today.

Read More

4

The English rock band Led Zeppelin were formed in 1968 evolving from The Yardbirds, with a line up of Robert Plant (vocals), Jimmy Page (guitar), John Bonham (drums) andJohn Paul Jones (keyboards and bass guitar). They developed a unique style (at least then) blending heavy metal rifts with ‘acoustic’ interludes’.

Led Zeppelin incorporated musical genres of heavy metal, hard rock and blues rock. Apart from that they also used a wide range of other musical genres such as reggae, funk, rockabilly, soul, Celtic, Classical, Arabic, Latin, Pop and Country.

One thing that distinguished Led Zeppelin was their notion to promote album-oriented rock in the United Kingdom and around the World so they never released famous songs from their albums as singles in the country (for example “Stairway to Heaven”). Their first album “Led Zeppelin 1" was already in the Billboard 100 before being released in the UK, following an extensive US tour. Posters/ads from that tour can be found in this archive.

Read More

4

The Dead Kennedys merged revolutionary politics with hardcore punk music and, in the process, became one of the defining hardcore bands. Often, they were more notable for their politics than their music, but that was part of their impact. The Kennedys were more inspired by British punk and the fiery, revolutionary-implied politics of the Sex Pistols than the artier tendencies of New York punk rockers. Under the direction of lead vocalist Jello Biafra, the Dead Kennedys became the most political and, to the eyes of many observers, including Christians and right-wing politicians, the most dangerous band in hardcore. By the mid-’80s, the band had become notorious enough to open themselves up to a prosecution for obscenity (concerning a poster inserted into their 1985 Frankenchrist album), and the ensuing court battle sped the band toward a breakup, but they left behind a legacy that influenced countless punk bands that followed.

Read More

4

The members of Panic! at the Disco had barely graduated high school when their full-length debut, A Fever You Can’t Sweat Out, transformed the suburban Las Vegas teenagers into national emo-pop stars. The band had materialized several years earlier, when friends Spencer Smith (drums) and Ryan Ross (guitar) began covering blink-182tunes together. After tiring of playing another group’s material, the duo recruited two additional classmates, guitar/vocalist Brendon Urie and bassist Brent Wilson, and the newly-formed quartet decided to model its name after a line in Name Taken’s “Panic”. Crafting pop-influenced songs with theatrical touches, quirky techno beats, and perceptive lyrics, Panic! at the Disco posted several demos online that soon caught the attention ofDecaydance Records, the Fueled by Ramen imprint headed by Fall Out Boy’s Pete Wentz. Even though the band had yet to play a live show, they subsequently became the first band signed to the label.

Read More

Alanis Morissette’s 1995 release Jagged Little Pill sold over ten million copies and won her four Grammy Awards. Its slew of hit singles, kicked off with the vituperative “You Oughta Know,” made Morissette an alternative music star overnight. Yet the singersongwriter also endured some flak for her success, especially after word leaked out that she had suffered a rather unsuccessful earlier incarnation as a big-haired, drum-machine-backed teen singer in Canada. Nevertheless, the candid songs of Jagged Little Pill, penned by Morissette as she matured out of her teens, spoke to a broad cross-section of adolescents and adults alike.



Read More
2

Johnny Cash, born in Arkansas in 1932 was a singer-songwriter and one of the most influential musicians of the 20th century. He was known for his deep bass-baritone voice and as “The Man in Black" for his dark clothing. Although primarily known as a country music artist, his songs spanned many other genres including rockabilly and rock and roll as well as blues, folk and gospel. Johnny’s first recordings for Sun Records “Hey Porter” and “Cry Cry Cry” released in 1955 saw some success. However, his next record “Folsom Prison Blues" reached No. 5 in the country charts and "I Walk the Line" reached No.1. In the early 1960’s Cash battled with drink and drugs, however he continued to deliver with “Ring of Fire” reaching No.1 in the country music charts and and making the crossover to the pop charts.


Read More

4

Black Sabbath came together in 1967 to form one of the seminal Heavy metal bands of all time. The band was instrumental in creating the imagery commonly associated with Heavy Metal, the occult inspired, apocalyptic, death and destruction imagery that has so often been imitated over the years. Black Sabbath, were notorious for their amplified distortion, monstrous beats and the emphatic guitar solos of Tony Iommi.


Read More

As lead guitarist for The BeatlesGeorge Harrison provided the band with a lyrical style of playing in which every note mattered. Harrison was one of millions of young Britons inspired to take up the guitar by British skiffle king Lonnie Donegan’s recording of “Rock Island Line”. But he had more dedication than most, and with the encouragement of a slightly older school friend, Paul McCartney, he advanced quickly in his technique and command of the instrument. Harrison developed his style and technique slowly and painstakingly over the several years, learning everything he could from the records of Carl PerkinsDuane EddyChet AtkinsBuddy Holly, and Eddie Cochran. By age 15, he was allowed to sit in with the Quarry Men, the Liverpool group founded by John Lennon, of which McCartney was a member; by 16, he was a full-fledged member of the group.

Read More

2

Throughout the ’80s, they worked relentlessly, releasing records every year and touring constantly, playing both theaters and backwoods dives. Along the way, they inspired countless bands, from the legions of jangle pop groups in the mid-’80s to scores of alternative pop groups in the ’90s, who admired their slow climb to stardom. It did take R.E.M. several years to break into the top of the charts, but they had a cult following from the release of their debut EP, Chronic Town, in 1982. Chronic Town established the haunting folk and garage rock that became the band’s signature sound, and over the next five years, they continued to expand their music with a series of critically acclaimed albums. By the late ’80s, the group’s fan base had grown large enough to guarantee strong sales, but the Top Ten success in 1987 of Document and “The One I Love" was unexpected, especially since R.E.M. had only altered their sound slightly. FollowingDocumentR.E.M. slowly became one of the world’s most popular bands. After an exhaustive international tour supporting 1988’s Green, the band retired from touring for six years and retreated into the studio to produce their most popular records, Out of Time(1991) and Automatic for the People (1992). By the time they returned to performing with the Monster tour in 1995, the band had been acknowledged by critics and musicians as one of the forefathers of the thriving alternative rock movement, and they were rewarded with the most lucrative tour of their career. Toward the late ’90s, R.E.M. was an institution, as its influence was felt in new generations of bands. 

4

The Beach Boys was mostly a family affair. The group was made up of brothers Carl,Brian and Dennis Wilson cousin Mike Love and friend Al JardineThe Wilson brothers father had modest success in the music industry. Brian had learnt to play piano while watching his father, and he  and his brothers practiced vocal harmonies to hits of the day. 

Read More

3

The boy who would become Bob Dylan was born Robert Allen Zimmerman on 24th May, 1941 in Duluth, Minnesota. In a career spanning over 5 decades, Dylan has won GrammysGolden Globes and Academy Awards, been inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame and the Songwriters Hall of Fame and was awarded a Pulitzer Prize in 2008 for his impact on pop music and American culture.

Read More

2

Manowar was formed by ex-Dictators and Shakin’ Street guitarist Ross the Boss. The original line-up included vocalist Eric Adams, bassist Joey DeMaio, and drummer Donnie Hamzik. The group’s kitschy approach was designed to be the raw, primal, macho antithesis of classic rock.

Read More


Rising from the ashes of the legendary British post-punk unit Joy Division, the enigmatic New Order triumphed over tragedy to emerge as one of the most influential and acclaimed bands of the 1980s; embracing the electronic textures and disco  rhythms of the underground club culture many years in advance of its contemporaries, the group’s pioneering fusion of new wave aesthetics and dance music successfully bridged the gap between the two worlds, creating a distinctively thoughtful and oblique brand of synth pop appealing equally to the mind, body, and soul.

Read More

4

A bright new noise in U.K. alternative rock in the ’90s and into the new millennium,Stereophonics are comprised of vocalist/guitarist Kelly Jones, bassist Richard Jones, and drummer Stuart Cable (until the latter’s replacement by Javier Weyler). They were formed in Cwmaman, South Wales, originally as the teenage cover band Tragic Love Company. Early reviews cited the Manic Street Preachers as their most obvious influence, and their initial batch of singles struggled to disabuse cynics of this notion.

Read More

2

Upon the release of their first album in the late ’70s, Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers were shoehorned into the punk/new wave movement by some observers who picked up on the tough, vibrant energy of the group’s blend of Byrds riffs and Stonesy swagger. In a way, the categorization made sense. Compared to the heavy metal and art rock that dominated mid-’70s guitar rock, the Heartbreakers’ bracing return to roots was nearly as unexpected as the crashing chords of the Clash. As time progressed, it became clear that the band didn’t break from tradition like their punk contemporaries. Instead, they celebrated it, culling the best parts of the British Invasion, American garage rock, and Dylanesque singer/songwriters to create a distinctively American hybrid that recalled the past without being indebted to it.

Read More

Text
Photo
Quote
Link
Chat
Audio
Video