Campo del Cielo iron meteorite. Structural classification is coarse octahedrite. Weight is 3 kilograms. This photo shows wonderfully developed regmaglypts, also referred to as “thumbprints”. The regmaglypts formed while the meteoroid ablated during passage through the atmosphere. The Campo del Cielo meteorites come from Argentina, where they are believed to have fallen between 4,000 and 5,000 years ago. Nickel-iron meteorites, such as this one, are fragments of the cores of larger ancient asteroids (similar to Earths iron core), that have been shattered by impacts with other asteroids. After spending 4,500 million years in space this piece of ancient iron core found its way to Earth from the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter.

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Campo del Cielo iron meteorite. Structural classification is coarse octahedrite. Weight is 544 grams for this palm sized meteorite. This photo shows wonderfully developed regmaglypts, also referred to as “thumbprints”. The regmaglypts formed while the meteoroid ablated during passage through the atmosphere. The Campo del Cielo meteorites come from Argentina, where they are believed to have fallen between 4,000 and 5,000 years ago. Nickel-iron meteorites, such as this one, are fragments of the cores of larger ancient asteroids (similar to Earths iron core), that have been shattered by impacts with other asteroids. After spending 4,500 million years in space this piece of ancient iron core found its way to Earth from the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter.

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Campo del Cielo iron meteorite. Structural classification is coarse octahedrite. Weight is 3 kilograms. This photo shows wonderfully developed regmaglypts, also referred to as “thumbprints”. The regmaglypts formed while the meteoroid ablated during passage through the atmosphere. The Campo del Cielo meteorites come from Argentina, where they are believed to have fallen between 4,000 and 5,000 years ago. Nickel-iron meteorites, such as this one, are fragments of the cores of larger ancient asteroids (similar to Earths iron core), that have been shattered by impacts with other asteroids. After spending 4,500 million years in space this piece of ancient iron core found its way to Earth from the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter.

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Sikhote-Alin individual iron meteorite. Structural classification is coarsest octahedrite type IIB. Weight is 100 grams. Well developed regmaglypts (thumb prints) resulted from ablation of the meteoroid as it melted during flight.  The Sikhote-Alin Meteorite was an observed fall on the Sikhote-Alin mountains in Siberia in 1947. An estimated 70 Tonnes of this iron-nickel meteorite made it to the ground. Two forms of this meteorite exist. The “Individual” that is shown in this picture is a broken piece of the main mass that continued to “burn up” in the atmosphere before hitting the ground. The “Shrapnel” form consists of torn and twisted fragments that formed when the meteoroid exploded near the ground or upon impaction. The individuals of the Sikhote-Alin fall are one of the most sought after meteorites by collectors because of their exquisite shapes and character. 

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Canyon Diablo iron meteorite. Structural classification is coarse octahedrite. Weight is 133 grams. This photo shows  developed regmaglypts, also referred to as “thumbprints”. The regmaglypts formed while the meteoroid ablated during passage through the atmosphere. The Canyon Diablo meteorites come from the famous Barringer Crater (aka Meteor Crater) near Flagstaff, Arizona, USA,  where they are believed to have fallen about 50,000 years ago. Iron-nickel meteorites, such as this one, are fragments of the cores of larger ancient asteroids (similar to Earths iron core), that have been shattered by impacts with other asteroids. After spending 4,500 million years in space this piece of ancient iron core found its way to Earth from the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. The photo of Meteor Crater shown above is about 1 mile wide and 600 feet deep and is one of the best preserved meteorite craters in the world. 

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