You ever look at a picture of yourself, and see a stranger in the background? It makes you wonder how many strangers have pictures of you. How many moments of other peoples life have we been in. Were we a part of someone’s life when their dream came true or were we there when their dream died. Did we keep trying to get in? As if we were somehow destined to be there or did the shot take us by surprise. Just think, you could be a big part of someone elses life, and not even know it.
—  Lucas Scott

In the wild, wolves and crows (and ravens) are frequently found in each other’s company. The crows fly ahead of the wolf pack to locate prey. In exchange, the grateful wolves leave behind a few tasty morsels for the scavenging crows. There is also evidence that the two species simply enjoy being around each other, as wolves and crows are commonly observed exhibiting playful behavior with one another.

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Raven tells an old man all about his day and then when the man laughs the bird LAUGHS WITH HIM, which is a good way to relieve stress

You can bet Palmer feels empathy and sympathy for Rice. She probably does love him. She more-than-likely hopes and believes he will change. He has probably promised to change many times. This is old hat. Women who have been in abusive relationships know exactly how it goes and how it feels. It’s not easy to believe that someone who claims to love you and who you feel love towards would hurt you. Of course we hope they will stop. Of course we want them to change and want to believe they will. Abusive men aren’t all abusive 24 hours a day. We hang on to the good moments — that’s why we stay.

Abuse is a mindfuck. We are made to feel dependent on our abusers. We feel embarrassed and ashamed at what we’ve been put through, what we’ve “put up with,” at the verbal and emotional abuse we’ve been subjected to. At the reality of our lives and the crazy, humiliating, inexplicable behaviour we’ve witnessed. How can you tell someone those things? Surely no one will understand… Our self-esteem deteriorates. We become isolated from our support systems. We feel we can’t ask for help because we’ve left and gone back so many times over and we know our friends and family are sick of it. We feel judged and we feel stupid and we feel weak. We are strong women and we know better. We feel like we can take it. We can cope. We compartmentalize — shutting the bad stuff out. We tell ourselves it isn’t so bad. We really, really want it to get better. He says he’ll go to counseling. He says he’ll stop drinking. He says if only we’d change our tone of voice or our body language or be gentler or kinder or more thoughtful… If only. We stop trusting ourselves. Is it our fault? Is this normal? Maybe I did provoke him…

Abuse isn’t as simple as you want it to be. It isn’t clear cut. It isn’t easy to leave. It isn’t easy to give up on someone we care about and have invested time and energy and emotion into. But no matter what Palmer does, no matter what she feels or says, it doesn’t make his actions ok. And it doesn’t mean she deserved it.

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"Stop the victim-blaming!" CNN did a superb job of holding Fox accountable for its shameful remarks about Ray Rice beating his wife. 

On September 8th, Fox advised women(like Ray Rice’s wife) who don’t want to be brutally beaten by their partners in an elevator to “take the stairs.” And for men who are considering beating their fiances: “When you’re in an elevator, there’s a camera.”

The next day, Fox & Friends addressed its poor judgment in commentary:

Comments that we made during this story yesterday made some feel like we were taking the situation too lightly. We are not. We were not. Domestic abuse is a very serious issue to us, I can assure you.

CNN’s Brian Stelter called Fox’s follow-up remarks a ”very cheap way to pretend to apologize,” a fairly spot-on assessment. 

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