rainforests

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Hooker’s Lips

This rare plant is named Psychotria elata. It is more commonly known as the Flower Lips, Hooker’s Lips or Hot Lips plant. Some people refer to them as Mick Jagger’s lips. The plant forms bright red bracts (specialized leaves) resembling the lips of a woman wearing red lipstick. These plants are found in the tropical rainforests of Colombia, Costa Rica, Panama and Ecuador. Due to deforestation, these spectacular plants have become endangered.

PSA! Since i was 9 years old i’ve been doing everything i can with my mum to save the Tigers from extinction. And now it seems that in the near future Tigers will no longer roam this planet. Please if you can do ANYTHING to help it would be greatly appreciated. I know lots of you don’t have the money to donate, neither do i. So spread the word on social media, sign petitions, etc.

Here are some petition/website links 

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Signal Boost thing asap! 

The Amazing Amazon Milk Frog

Amazon Milk Frogs, also known as Mission Golden-eyed Tree Frogs or Blue Milk Frogs, were first found in Rio de Janeiro’s Maracanã River. The name “Milk Frog” refers to the poisonous, white, milky secretion that this frog secretes when threatened. But what about that blue mouth? This species is most active at night and is known for its loud vocalizations. During the day, they sleep in the vegetation high above streams. These tree frogs spend their entire lives in the tropical rainforest canopy (rarely, if ever, descending to the ground). They are native to northern South America (Colombia, Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador, Peru and Venezuela). These frogs can live up to 25 years. Breeding usually occurs in the rainy season (November through May) with the female laying about 2,500 eggs, which hatch into tadpoles in only one day. 

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I’d like to tell you the reasons why our husbands were killed. They fought for the conservation of their lands. They fought for their land rights … And they also fought against illegal logging on our lands,” says Ergilia Rengifo of her late husband Jorge Ríos, who was murdered in September. “It saddens me greatly because they leave a great hole, and they leave us as widows and their children without fathers.”

She and Julia Pérez appeared on Democracy Now! today in an interview live from the U.N. climate summit in Lima, Peru. Global Witness says that Peru is one of the most dangerous countries for environmental and indigenous activists.