radical-indigenous-survivance-&-empowerment

Map of Dinétah (Navajo Nation)
Land expansion 1933

R.I.S.E.

RADICAL
INDIGENOUS
SURVIVANCE &
EMPOWERMENT

http://www.facebook.com/RISEIndigenous
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On February 27, 1973, over 200 Oglala Lakota tribal members and supporters of the American Indian Movement (A.I.M.) seized the town of Wounded Knee, located on the Pine Ridge Reservation. 

The controversial occupation of Wounded Knee lasted 71 days during which there was continuous confrontation between Natives and U.S. government law officials, including the F.B.I.

http://www.aics.org/WK/

http://blackhillsknowledgenetwork.org/article/wounded-knee-occupation-1973
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In the spirit of Unthanksgiving Day!!

High resolution 24” x 20.4” poster of North America from 
"A New Map of North America Shewing all the New Discoveries 1797," from A Century of Population Growth, U.S. Bureau of the Census, 1909. As with all our posters, feel liberated to print out & wheatpaste at will! 

R.I.S.E.

Radical
Indigenous
Survivance &
Empowerment

Info:
https://www.facebook.com/RISEIndigenous
contact: burymyart@gmail.com
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5

Demian Diné Yazhi’ (RISE: Radical Indigenous Survivance & Empowerment) hit the grimy streets of the Indian Capital of the World (Gallup, NM) today, initiating our ‪#‎DECOLONIZEFEMINISM‬ wheatpaste poster project. A special “Thank You” goes out to Ryan Dennison (Deadrezkids Records) for his phenomenal rezstyle Blue Bird Flour wheatpaste mix and for driving through familiar territory as an ally & warrior!

For further information on the posters, please email us at: burymyart@gmail.com

http://burymyart.tumblr.com
http://facebook.com/RISEindigenous

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RISE: Radical Indigenous Survivance & Empowerment officially hit 1,000 likes on Facebook. As a gesture of gratitude we wanted to share with you a new poster/image for our #DECOLONIZEFEMINISM project. Ahe’hee’! XO

http://www.burymyart.tumblr.com/
http://www.facebook.com/RISEindigenous

Contact us: burymyart@gmail.com

R.I.S.E.
Radical
Indigenous
Survivance &
Empowerment

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High resolution 18” x 24” poster of Indigenous Kawaik/Yoeme (Laguna/Yaqui) Indian Child Welfare Act advocate/warrior/feminist Evelyn Blanchard. As with all our posters, feel liberated to print out & wheatpaste at will! 
 
About Evelyn Blanchard & Indigenous Child Removal Policies:

“I was able to find all of these women in their own tribal communities who were working to create really innovative programs to promote child welfare within their communities. They were trying to find foster families within the community. They were creating these kinds of preventative programs for families to prevent children from being taken in the first place and to strengthen families or rehabilitate families. These women were quite incredible. Some were also getting involved in a national level to try to organize to stop this practice.

One of these women was Evelyn Blanchard, Laguna/Yaqui, who became an advocate for children and families after losing a court case in which Navajo grandparents were not allowed to take custody of their grandchild, who had been placed outside the community. She worked with the Association on American Indian Affairs to help get the Indian Child Welfare Act passed in 1978. “After the law was passed,” Blanchard told ICTMN, “I worked with many tribes to help them develop their own children’s codes regarding care of children in their communities and to help them figure out how they would respond to the law, which was written for state courts, not Indian tribes.”

Blanchard explains, “The ICWA regulates the acts of state courts or public and private agencies. That’s what it’s supposed to do and its intent is to prevent the breakup of the Indian families because records show that before the passage one out of every four children had been removed from his or her family and 85 percent of those kids were not in Indian homes. The tribes were tired of it. They wanted it stopped and the pattern reversed.”

Read more at: http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2014/11/21/stealing-children-look-indigenous-child-removal-policies-157884

R.I.S.E.

Radical
Indigenous
Survivance &
Empowerment

Info:

https://www.facebook.com/RISEIndigenous
contact: burymyart@gmail.com
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Dr. King spoke out against the genocide of Native Americans
by: Albert Bender

Despite the yearly celebrations of Martin Luther King Day and African American History Month, it is probably little known what the great freedom fighter had to say about the horrific mistreatment of Native Americans by the U.S. In his 1963 book, “Why We Can’t Wait,” writing about the origins of racism in this country, King strongly condemned the historic injustices inflicted on Native people. He wrote the following:

"Our nation was born in genocide when it embraced the doctrine that the original American, the Indian, was an inferior race. Even before there were large numbers of Negroes on our shores, the scar of racial hatred had already disfigured colonial society. From the sixteenth century forward, blood flowed in battles of racial supremacy. We are perhaps the only nation which tried as a matter of national policy to wipe out its Indigenous population. Moreover, we elevated that tragic experience into a noble crusade. Indeed, even today we have not permitted ourselves to reject or feel remorse for this shameful episode. Our literature, our films, our drama, our folklore all exalt it."  

Woefully, Dr. King’s words still ring true to this very day in so many respects. But King’s poignant words on the tragic history of Native Americans are largely unknown in mainstream society.

Although King played the leading role on the cutting edge of the African American liberation struggle for social justice and equality, he was a fighter for all of the oppressed of this land. His birthday holiday this year brought to mind a story I was told years ago of how he assisted Native people in south Alabama in the late 1950s.

At that time the Poarch Band of Creek Indians were trying to completely desegregate schools in their area. The South has so many seemingly outlandish racial problems: In this case, light-complected Native children were allowed to ride school buses to previously all white schools, while dark-skinned Indian children from the same band were barred from riding the same buses.

Tribal leaders, upon hearing of King’s desegregation campaign in Birmingham, Ala., contacted him for assistance. He promptly responded and through his intervention the problem was quickly resolved.          

Also, little known is that in the 1963 March on Washington there was a sizable Native American contingent, including many from South Dakota. Moreover, the civil rights movement inspired the Native American rights movement of the 1960s and many of its leaders. In fact, the Native American Rights Fund (NARF) was patterned after the NAACP’s Legal Defense and Education Fund.

Re-reading Dr. King’s words I had to harken back in history to the fact that according to U.S. Census Bureau figures, by 1900 there were only 237,196 Native Americans left in the entire country - this from an original population that numbered in the tens of millions. In the words of one historian the outright massacres had ceased by then, simply “because there were just not that many Indians left to kill.” King rightly concluded that the genocide of American Indians was “national policy.” Indeed, on many reservations the story still circulates that as late as the 1890s a debate was held by the U.S. Congress to consider the outright military extermination of all remaining Native Americans. According to these accounts the only reason this nefarious plan was not carried out was because it would be too expensive.

But fast forwarding to the 21st century it must be seen that both the civil rights movement and the Native American rights movement have had a major impact on the U.S. and the world at large. Dr. King played an immeasurable role in these movements that roiled the status quo and marked a new stage of struggles that are ongoing to this day.

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R.I.S.E.

Radical
Indigenous
Survivance &
Empowerment

Info:
http://www.burymyart.tumblr.com/
http://www.facebook.com/RISEindigenous
contact: burymyart@gmail.com

http://peoplesworld.org/dr-king-spoke-out-against-the-genocide-of-native-americans/

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MAP OF ARIZONA, 1919
Wheatpaste poster measuring 17.42” X 24”


Map of Arizona by C.S. Hammond and Co., from a 1919 world atlas. Cities, towns, railroad lines, Indian reservations and geographical features are shown throughout the state. 

R.I.S.E.:

RADICAL

INDIGENOUS
SURVIVANCE &
EMPOWERMENT

contact/info:
burymyart@gmail.com
http://burymyart.tumblr.com
http://facebook.com/RISEindigenous
_______________________________.

High resolution poster of Juanita, wife of Diné Chief Manuelito, taken by Charles Milton Bell in the late 1800s. As with all our posters, feel liberated to print out and wheatpaste at will!


R.I.S.E.:
Radical
Indigenous
Survivance &
Empowerment


https://www.facebook.com/RISEIndigenous

#DECOLONZEFEMINISM #FEMINISM #NOWAVE #NOWAVEFEMINISM #NATIVEWOMEN #AMERICANINDIAN #NDN #NATIVEEMPOWERMENT#RADICAL #INDIGENOUS #SURVIVANCE #EMPOWERMENT #DEMIANDINEYAZHI #RESISTANCE#RISE #RISEindigenous #WARRIOR #RESPECT #PUNKROCK
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High resolution 18” x 24” poster of a select Indigenous words describing various genders & sexualities inherent in Indigenous cultures. As with all our posters, feel liberated to print out & wheatpaste at will! 

Add to the list!!

R.I.S.E.

Radical
Indigenous
Survivance &
Empowerment

Info:

https://www.facebook.com/RISEIndigenous
contact: burymyart@gmail.com
____________________________.

MAP OF NEW MEXICO, 1904
Wheatpaste poster measuring 18” X 22.1”


Detailed map of the Territory, colored by Counties, showing towns, Indian Tribes, Reservations and related details, railroads, railroad stations, post offices, rivers, forts and other places of interest. . 

R.I.S.E.:

RADICAL

INDIGENOUS
SURVIVANCE &
EMPOWERMENT

contact/info:
burymyart@gmail.com
http://burymyart.tumblr.com
http://facebook.com/RISEindigenous
_______________________________.

Printable poster. Measures 24” x 36” // 300 dpi.

R.I.S.E.
Radical
Indigenous
Survivance &
Empowerment
_________________
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: CREATING A BIBLIOGRAPHY FOR:

R.I.S.E.

RADICAL
INDIGENOUS
SURIVANCE &
EMPOWERMENT

#studio #practice #R.I.S.E. #thesis #nativenorthamericanart
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High resolution poster of punk rock, indigenous radical queer warrior, Fred Martinez. As with all our posters, feel liberated to print out and wheatpaste at will!

Fred Martinez was nádleehí, a male-bodied person with a feminine nature, a special gift according to his ancient Navajo culture. But the place where two discriminations meet is a dangerous place to live, and Fred became one of the youngest hate-crime victims in modern history when he was brutally murdered at sixteen. Between tradition and controversy, sex and spirit, and freedom and fear, lives the truth—the bravest choice you can make is to be yourself
.

R.I.S.E.

Radical
Indigenous
Survivance &
Empowerment

Info:
http://twospirits.org/
https://www.facebook.com/RISEIndigenous
contact: burymyart@gmail.com
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7

By request, R.I.S.E. is now selling their posters in an online store on Etsywww.etsy.com/shop/demiandineyazhi. The posters are still free for digital download at burymyart.tumblr.com, but not everyone has access to a printer. The price covers the cost of printing, shipping & handling, & helps support Contemporary Indigenous Art. Share and repost!

R.I.S.E.

Radical
Indigenous
Survivance &
Empowerment

Info:
http://burymyart.tumblr.com/
http://www.facebook.com/RISEIndigenous
http://www.etsy.com/shop/demiandineyazhi

contact: burymyart@gmail.com
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R.I.S.E.

RADICAL
INDIGENOUS
SURVIVANCE &
EMPOWERMENT

Excerpt: Why I Can’t Read Wallace Stegner, by Elizabeth Cook-Lynn
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The hardworking and wonderful folks at Visual AIDS recently asked to feature a poster I made earlier this week that is inspired by World AIDS Day & Day With(out) Art. The poster puts Indigenous communities into focus on the issues related to HIV/AIDS. I sat down to answer a few questions by the fearless Theodore Kerr regarding the creation of the poster, Indigenous Survivance, the rise in HIV/AIDS infections among Indigenous Peoples, and the positive affect the poster has made among the Native community thus far. I’m always honored to be included in the conversations posed by Visual AIDS, so thank you for the opportunity, babes!! xoxo

HIV/AIDS Is Quiet At Times In Native Communities.

 by -Visual AIDS Staff

Amid the outpouring of brilliance and media on World AIDS Day, a powerful poster by Radical Indigenous Survivance & Empowerment (R.I.S.E.) was released. Using facts, design and repetition, the poster works to illuminate to the viewer the reality of HIV amid Indigenous communities, under represented in contemporary discussion of the epidemic. The text that accompanies the poster on R.I.S.E’s website quotes the most recent available stats from the CDC concerning HIV and American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN), which states “By the end of 2010, an estimated 1,945 AI/AN with an AIDS diagnosis had died in the United States. In 2010, HIV infection was the ninth leading cause of death among AI/AN aged 25 to 34.” In the interview below artist, R.I.S.E. member and poster creator Demian Diné Yazhi’ talks about the poster, HIV/AIDS and Indigenous power with Theodore Kerr. 

Visual AIDS: The poster is very powerful. What made you create it?

Demian Diné Yazhi’: I actually woke up at 4:30 in the morning and immediately had a strong desire to create a poster, and I did so through an Indigenous artist/activist collective that I am a part of, R.I.S.E.: Radical Indigenous Survivance & Empowerment. However, what inspired its creation is the absence of art production in Indigenous communities that broach the topic of HIV/AIDS. Of course, I can only make that comment through what I’ve exposed myself to while researching Traditional, Customary, and Contemporary forms of Indigenous Art. Through my research, I’ve stumbled upon less than a handful of Indigenous artists whose work intentionally addresses the affects of HIV/AIDS—either for them personally or within their respective communities.

Using the inspiration of World AIDS Day, Day With(out) Art, and the concluding of November’s National American Indian Heritage Month, I used what resources were available and began working on a large, text-heavy poster that lays out a few facts. I wanted to create a bridge that linked thriving and struggling Indigenous communities to taboo issues like HIV/AIDS. In making this poster, I also wanted to challenge other Indigenous artists/activists to speak up and create a space for HIV/AIDS within their communities and ceremonies that simultaneously take into account the impacts of colonization, disease, and government neglect in the hopes of healing. The same goes out to HIV/AIDS and Queer artists/activists: I want all of us to challenge the work we make so it includes the voices of the Indigenous Peoples of this continent. It starts with something as simple as leaning the history of the Indigenous People(s) of the city or town you call “Home”.

The mistreatment of Indigenous Peoples of the Americas is no different than what the Queer community has faced under the control of Western powers. The difference is, in the Americas we are always walking and sleeping and fucking on Stolen Land, so the struggles Indigenous Peoples endure are often forgotten or overshadowed because our population is now only 1%. Yet, prior to disease, genocide, and concepts like “Manifest Destiny”, complex Indigenous societies were in full swing from coast to coast.

Visual AIDS: In the writing you include with the poster it is mentioned, “Of all races/ethnicities, AI/AN had the highest percentages of diagnosed HIV infections due to injection drug use.” This may be confusing for people to learn because of the reduction of HIV rates among Intravenous drug users due to needle exchange. Can you share with us some of the issues facing AI/AN when it comes to needle exchange? 

Demian Diné Yazhi’: This statistic surprised me as well. There are a few factors that come to mind, but it should also be noted that Indigenous communities, to some extent, have a difficult time trusting the Western Medical Industrial Complex. Not only were Indigenous Peoples forced to assimilate to Western standards of beauty, religion, language, sexuality, feminine/masculine roles, etc., but we were also forced to assimilate to the authority of Western doctors and health codes. I think we can all agree that there are some overwhelming benefits of Western medicine, but the issues that Indigenous women have experienced, like forced sterilization and lack of access to contraceptives, abortion, and rape kits, has forever tainted the perspective Indigenous communities have toward Western medicine. I would be remiss not include the fact that many Indigenous People continue to practice and benefit from Traditional ceremonies that have proven to be imperishable.

Having said that, the growing number of HIV/AIDS infections among intravenous drug users (IDUs) within Indigenous communities is likely tied to the lack of access to syringe exchange programs. Indian Reservations are often situated within the confining, colonized borders of conservative U.S. states, such as Arizona, Montana, South Dakota, Idaho, to name just a few. This means that often times these states do not have a legal needle and syringe exchange program set up, so this increases the likelihood of reusing needles; thereby increasing exposure to HIV/AIDS, as well as hepatitis B and C.

Reservations are also a hotbed for substance and drug abuse. As with any community that is plagued with racism, unemployment, poverty, or something as simple as unhealthy eating habits perpetuated by fast-“food” chains like McDonalds, the threat of exposure to unhealthy coping mechanisms is high. I recently watched a documentary on PBS (Native American Boomtown) that was making a correlation between the recent oil boom in North Dakota to the rise of gang activity and drug abuse on the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation. That’s not even taking into account the history of trouble spots like the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation or the Navajo Nation. Because of all the aforementioned factors and more, drug and substance abuse is high on Indian Reservations, and effective government programs are just not working—or finely tailored—to address the plethora of unique and elaborate Indigenous perspectives.

Visual AIDS: Can you share the meaning behind the word “Survivance” which is part of your collective’s name?

Demian Diné Yazhi’: To best answer this, I turn to the definition provided by Anishinaabe scholar, Gerald Vizenor. In his writing on the issue, Vizenor states, “Survivance - is an active sense of presence, the continuance of native stories, not a mere reaction, or a survivable name. Native survivance stories are renunciations of dominance, tragedy and victimry.”

Every morning Indigenous Peoples of the Americas wake up in the colonized lands that stretch from Canada to Tierra de Fuego, and in those first few moments of the day they are making a political statement of resistance. The fact that we are still here to speak our language, or practice our ceremonies without the cruel judgment of Western religion, is a very real threat to the colonizers and big businesses that are hungry for our resources. Indigenous bodies are expendable to them and we rise every morning to prove them wrong. Those are just a handful of examples regarding acts of survivance.

The issues that R.I.S.E. is dedicated to addressing fall under the categories of decolonization, indigenization, feminism, and political activism, and we do this through curatorial inquiry, public interventions, wheatpaste/street art, and by creating free digital posters for download on our tumblr blog: burymyart.tumblr.com. Survivance is a part of our agenda. Empowering our community and dedicating ourselves to our artwork is another part. It’s a life-long battle that must be fought in order to ensure the perseverance of land and people, but also to re-establish the relationship of the people to the land. It’s not just an Indian thing, it’s a human necessity.

Visual AIDS: Repetition is used very effectively on the poster, what was the process like in creating the text?

Demian Diné Yazhi’: Well, I woke up at 4:30 and knew I wanted to make a poster. That was my initial thought. Everything else just came streaming out of the canyon, as it were. I started off as a writer, so most of the images that come to mind are text-based. Sometimes I include photography, Native-inspired designs, and appropriated photographs or designs, like with this #decolonizefeminism series that utilizes appropriated images of Indigenous women with original text.

In this case, I started off attempting to create an image/design by paying close attention to the text layout. Originally, I was shooting for an upside-down triangle, because queerness is pretty heavily embedded in my politics. But as I started designing the poster I realized that I wanted to distract the reader by creating an abstract image that still had some resemblance of a shape. I wanted to infect the readers mind with an image that was aesthetically ridged. The use of repetition allows the reader an entry point into any line. It allows for a gradient of meaning—various entry points for the multifaceted reader—and it creates a cohesion that ties and binds all the issues addressed. It connects these issues that Indigenous Peoples face and has the potential to speak beyond HIV/AIDS, while allowing “outsiders” to consider their placement in the larger picture. Lastly, I was influenced by traditional Diné (Navajo) songs, which use repetition as a way to speak of continuity. There is always retelling, renewal, reimaging, revolution…

Visual AIDS: What has been some of the response to the poster?

Demian Diné Yazhi’: Well, it’s difficult to say. When I put out a poster, I typically post it to our blog and facebook page (facebook.com/RISEindigenous), so the poster goes out and into the digital world and does its own thing. Brittany Britton, an Indigenous Hupa Queer artist in Portland, OR, responded by including a story about her uncle who passed away 22 years ago from the disease. In the post Britton says, “HIV/AIDS is quiet at times in native communities, which followed surrounding stigmas of queerness that also didn’t allow for his death to be acknowledged by the greater community or family.” McEwan University’s Sexual Healthy Club reposted the image and suggests that the topic needs “more than just 24 hours of attention - especially in the way that the continued colonization of land and institution, ensures that HIV/AIDS remains an issue in Indigenous communities.”

At the end of the day, Indigenous Peoples experience physical, mental, and ancestral trauma that typically is ignored in mainstream Western culture. There is still little representation of Indigenous culture in the larger society, yet you just have to look at things like organic gardening, punk rock ideology, environmental activism, and the fashion and jewelry industry to see its larger influence. There is a stigma in this country about going/not going to an Indian Reservation that is often tied to racist stereotypes, but the fact remains that you cannot engage in a dialogue of democracy, sustainability, environmental justice, or gentrification by leaving Indigenous Peoples out of the conversation. Stigma inside and outside of Indian Reservations has ties to colonization, torture, negligence, privilege, and forced religious, health, and cultural assimilation. It is our duty as human beings of this living continent to make radical changes to the way we think of history, health, creating diverse communities, and our relationship to living organisms. Hopefully we can all work together in order to ensure our own acts of survivance

http://www.visualaids.org/blog/detail/8884
http://www.facebook.com/RISEindigenous

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Native Americans Should Stop Using #NativeLivesMatter

So, Black people have constantly been pointing out that #BlackLivesMatter is a very specific hashtag that was created by and for Black peoples struggles against racist policing and violence. The appropriation of #BlackLivesMatter is a part of the constant process of other groups trying to steal momentum from Black struggles, much like how other groups tried to appropriate #BlackOut. As Native Americans, we have more than enough imagination and history of struggle to draw upon that doesn’t rely upon the appropriation of Black peoples creativity and struggle.

Some other potential hashtags to use:
#RISE (stands for Radical Indigenous Survivance and Empowerment)
#StopTheGenocide
#NoMoreDeadNatives

I’m not the most creative person, I’m sure we as a community can think of more and/or better ones, but I think this is a good way for us to create sites to empower and support our own struggles without copying others. 

And if any Black/African American members have comments about how we can best approach this issue, I welcome them.