race-in-america

A general observation...

Complaining about race in America to liberals: “If you don’t like it, then do something about it to make a change!” 

Complaining about race in America to conservatives: “If you don’t like it, then get out!”

The Struggle Part Two:
  • Blacks in the 1800's:I know first hand what racism is. I am a victim of a violent diaspora and genocide, like many non-european whites around the world.
  • Blacks in the early 1900:I know first hand what racism is. Reconstruction of the South only led to the KKK, who stalk, torture and humiliate my family for no reason, other than or skin color. They bomb our churches, they kidnap and rape our children, they harass us to no end, even though we are a peaceful people who just want equality.
  • Blacks in the 1930s:I know first hand what racism is. I have seen my family members lynched and killed for trying to vote (cough my great Uncle). I have been denied the right to education since my ancestors arrival. Ethnic Cleansing/Lynching/Genocide occurs in the south everyday at this point. I fear for my life.
  • Blacks in the 1950s:I know first hand what racism is. Jim Crow laws. Segregation created by whites. Without Brown vs. Board of Eduction, I would not have any access to real schools. And they continue to lynch our people. Police invade our houses and kill our unarmed sons for no reason, and get away with it. The KKK has infiltrated our justice and legal system for hundreds of years now, ensuring that there is no legal justice for Blacks in America, ever.
  • Blacks in the 60s & and 70s:I know first hand what racism is. I have been denied equal access to Colleges despite Brown vs. Board of education. I have been denied access to equal housing even if I do have the money to buy a house in the "white" part of town. I have witnessed my leaders (Martin, Malcolm, Medgar) murdered in cold blood.... simply for fighting for whats right in this world... civil rights.
  • Blacks in in the 80s and 90s:I know first hand what racism is. I have witnessed the governments (Reagan) direct tactics against Black people; the contra deal, placing drugs in Black and Mexican communities. then changing laws to make sure they are placed in jail for disproportionate amounts of time. We still need to bus our children into white areas to ensure they have equal access to education. And still they will experience racism. I am denied equal access to bank loans, house loans and credit cards because of my race.
  • Modern era Blacks:We experience racism til this day. We are still denied equal access to schools with the removal of Affirmative Action, we are still harassed by police frequently via racial profiling, and blacks are twice as likely to be unemployed not because of skill... but because no one will hire us. We deal with the onset of White Privilege everyday with psychotic terms as "reverse racism." Even if we are college educated, the average white person believes we are a part of gangs, on welfare or live in the "ghetto" (a jewish term). We are still discriminated against by banks, police and the government as a whole. When will this end?
  • White People:I know what racism is. A black person was mean to me once. I once lost a job to a minority. I have to hear Blacks complain about racism all the time. Its not real. Its all about class now. I totally voted for Obama. Racism is over.
  • Black People:.....................................................
The Kidnapping of a King: How the media sanitized the legacy of Dr. King

             

(February 2014)

Today marks the 28th Martin Luther King Jr. Day.  It also marks 28 years of reducing the legacy of radical social justice and antiwar activist into that of loving quotes on racial reconciliation. Ultimately, think back to what you were taught about Dr. King and you’ll most likely remember his role in bus boycotts, sit-ins, and famous speeches. Like the memorial erected for him in Washington D.C., the meaning of Dr. King’s legacy has been ossified by the establishment into one of nonviolence and love.  What you are not taught is that Dr. King’s concept of love manifested in his theories on social justice, economic equity, human rights, and global war. Today, the establishment that hated Dr. King markets an illusion of who he was.  I’ll let the good Doctor make his own case:

 On war, capitalism, and civil rights

“I am convinced that if we are to get on the right side of the world revolution, we as a nation must undergo a radical revolution of values. We must rapidly begin the shift from a thing-oriented society to a person-oriented society. When machines and computers, profit motives and property rights are considered more important than people, the giant triplets of racism, materialism, and militarism are incapable of being conquered.”

 On economic justice 

“True compassion is more than flinging a coin to a beggar; it comes to see that an edifice which produces beggars needs restructuring. ”

On internal colonialism

“The purpose of the slum is to confine those who have no power and perpetuate their powerlessness. The slum is little more than a domestic colony which leaves its inhabitants dominated politically, exploited economically, segregated and humiliated at every turn.”

On Jim Crow as both racial and class warfare 

“The Southern aristocracy took the world and gave the poor white man Jim Crow…And when his wrinkled stomach cried out for the food that his empty pockets could not provide, he ate Jim Crow, a psychological bird that told him that no matter how bad off he was, at least he was a white man, better than a black man.”

**

You were probably taught that Dr. King’s harshest critics were white southerners and more radical elements within the movement like Malcolm X. The truth is that during his life the mainstream media criticized Dr. King. On his stance on the Vietnam War, Life magazine described his speeches as “demagogic slander that sounded like a script for Radio Hanoi.”

During his life, Dr. King was not well received by the establishment. In the years since his death in 1968, his image and political significance have been sanitized and neutralized. He serves as a mouthpiece for love and compassion as the keys of historical progress. What one should remember was that Dr. King was intensely critical of the capitalist state, global war, and separating economic rights from civil rights. What Dr. King was for was protest, education and direct action. If you truly honor Dr. King and his legacy, you honor the core values of what he stood for.

 

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“The bottom line is that America is not, and has never tried to produce African adults who are functional, self-sufficient…who understand their politics, their economics, and their relationship to the world politic and the worlds economics”

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Huey P. Newton, Ishmael Reed & Jawanza Kunjufu On Racism Again Black Men (1988)

There are more African-Americans on probation, parole, or in prison today than were slaves in 1850. It is not a crisis of crime, it is a crisis of people being left behind. For this week’s Newsweek, President Obama’s former spiritual advisor, Joshua DuBois, writes, ’The Fight for Black Men.‘ 

“If we’re honest,” DuBois writes, “we’ll have to admit that when one single group of people is conspicuously left behind, it never bodes well for society as a whole. In many ways, black men in America are a walking gut check; we learn from them a lot about ourselves, how far we’ve really come as a country, and how much further we have to go.”

…the notion that we should all forsake attachment to race and/or cultural identity and be “just humans” within the framework of white supremacy has usually meant that subordinate groups must surrender their identities, beliefs, values, and assimilate by adopting the values and beliefs of privileged-class whites, rather than promoting racial harmony this thinking has created a fierce cultural protectionism.
—  bell hooks, killing rage: Ending Racism
The brutal truth is that the bulk of white people in American never had any interest in educating black people, except as this could serve white purposes. It is not the black child’s language that is in question, it is not his language that is despised: It is his experience. A child cannot be taught by anyone who despises him, and a child cannot afford to be fooled. A child cannot be taught by anyone whose demand, essentially, is that the child repudiate his experience, and all that gives him sustenance, and enter a limbo in which he will no longer be black, and in which he knows that he can never become white. Black people have lost too many black children that way. And, after all, finally, in a country with standards so untrustworthy, a country that makes heroes of so many criminal mediocrities, a country unable to face why so many of the nonwhite are in prison, or on the needle, or standing, futureless, in the streets–it may very well be that both the child, and his elder, have concluded that they have nothing whatever to learn from the people of a country that has managed to learn so little.
— 

If Black English Isn’t a Language, Then Tell Me, What Is?

James Baldwin’s concluding graf is the literary equivalent of the mic drop.

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This girl on my college Facebook page made some comments about feeling uncomfortable rooming with a black person.

My cousin once told me, “black people constantly have to adapt to white culture but when white people have to do it it’s a culture shock and they can’t handle it”

Leave your opinions below

Massive double standard. Sports fans destroy their own cities and campuses with each championship. The “no other race” claim is complete bullshit.

Proves white people do not see their own violence. Even when they do, they absolve themselves of the crimes and never broadly stereotype an entire race.

Sarah Jackson, a professor at Northeastern University whose research focuses on social movements, said the civil rights establishment embraces the “Martin Luther King-Al Sharpton model”—which emphasizes mobilizing people for rallies and speeches and tends to be centered around a charismatic male leader. But the younger activists are instead inclined to what Jackson called the “Fannie Lou Hamer-Ella Baker model”—an approach that embraces a grass roots and in which agency is widely diffused. Indeed, many of the activists name-checked Baker, a lesser-known but enormously influential strategist of the civil rights era. She helped found Martin Luther King’s Southern Christian Leadership Conference but became deeply skeptical of the cult of personality that she felt had formed around him. And she vocally disagreed with the notion that power in the movement should be concentrated among a few leaders, who tended to be men with bases of power that lay in the church. “My theory is, strong people don’t need strong leaders,” she said.