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On this day in music history: April 24, 1976 - “Livin’ For The Weekend” by The O'Jays hits #1 on the Billboard R&B singles chart for 2 weeks, also peaking at #20 on the Hot 100 on the same date. Written by Kenny Gamble, Leon Huff, and Cary Gilbert, it is the fifth chart topping single for the R&B vocal trio from Canton, OH. Following up their previous smash, the R&B chart topping top five crossover smash “I Love Music”, The O'Jays will continue their hitmaking streak with the second single from their fourth studio album “Family Reunion”. The songs’ arresting dual slow and fast tempo shifts will create a sensation on the dance floor and will quickly become a favorite in clubs even before it is issued as a single. During the song’s run on the charts, original member William Powell will be diagnosed with cancer and be forced to retire from performing with the group on stage. However, he will continue to sing, making his final appearance on The O'Jays next album “Message In The Music”, released in late 1976. Powell will pass away on May 26, 1977 at the age of thirty five. Powell’s stage replacement, Sammy Strain (formerly of Little Anthony & The Imperials) will become a full fledged member of the group in mid 1977.

Opening with elegant, gentle piano, Ta-ku’s Love Again is an obvious swooner from the get go. The Australian producer’s new single is a sensual collaboration with JMSN and Sango from his forthcoming EP, Songs To Make Up To. Looks like he meant it with the EP name. Love Again is a sugary concoction full of soulful R&B and gospel passion. I’d forgive near anything if this were crooned to me in person. Smooth, real smooth, guys. The new EP will be out on June 12.

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On this day in music history: April 24, 1959 - “There Goes My Baby” by The Drifters is released. Written by Benjamin Nelson (Ben E. King), Lover Patterson, George Treadwell, Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, it is the first single featuring the second incarnation of the legendary R&B/doo-wop vocal group. The transition in group personnel takes place when The Drifters manager George Treadwell (former husband and manager of jazz singer Sarah Vaughan) fires the remaining original members after clashes over money and musical direction. Treadwell will replace them with a group of singers formerly known as The 5 Crowns, drafting them to become the new line up of The Drifters. For their first release as The Drifters, they will record “There Goes My Baby” with the songwriting and production team of Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller. The track is recorded on March 6, 1959 at Atlantic Studios in New York City, marking the first appearance of new lead singer Ben E. King. Leiber and Stoller’s groundbreaking use of strings and other orchestral instruments will change the face of R&B and pop music, going on to influence many songwriters and producers in the years that follow. Producer and songwriter Phil Spector will site the song as a major influence for his “Wall Of Sound” production technique. “There Goes My Baby” will spend one week at #1 on the Billboard R&B singles chart on July 27, 1959, peaking at #2 on the Hot 100 on August 17, 1959, and is inducted into the Grammy Hall Of Fame in 1998.