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Just posting this stupid, scribbledy comic for everyone who commented and sent me notes after I responded to that ask the other day.  I didn’t mean to make a thing of it - I just couldn’t resist replying with snark to something so abrasively nonsensical.  Nevertheless, I ended up with an inbox full of kind/funny messages and, well, let’s just say a self-help book penned by Jack Handey himself couldn’t have done a better job of being that uplifting, bizarre and hilarious.  I just wanted to say thanks for making me laugh.

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Why Do You Need ‘X’?


Note: You can purchase printed copies of these posters in various sizes from my RedBubble store.

These questions get to the heart of the issue at hand: Whose life is it anyway? If your life belongs to you, then you are free to decide how you deal with emergencies such as fire, injury, or crime. It is in your hands and no one has the right to take that away from you. If your life does not belong to you, then you are a slave whose life is in the hands of agents of the state. These agents have no interest in keeping you alive, or your possessions safe, beyond what they can extract from you through the force or fraud of state power, namely taxation.

Decided to revisit this idea with a little remix, based on something I made a while back.

Project: Posters

File this under “more details they neglected to mention in your high school history class”:

Frustrated that people continued to consume so much alcohol even after it was banned, federal officials had decided to try a different kind of enforcement. They ordered the poisoning of industrial alcohols manufactured in the United States, products regularly stolen by bootleggers and resold as drinkable spirits. The idea was to scare people into giving up illicit drinking. Instead, by the time Prohibition ended in 1933, the federal poisoning program, by some estimates, had killed at least 10,000 people. […]

Furious anti-Prohibition legislators pushed for a halt in the use of lethal chemistry. “Only one possessing the instincts of a wild beast would desire to kill or make blind the man who takes a drink of liquor, even if he purchased it from one violating the Prohibition statutes," proclaimed Sen. James Reed of Missouri.

Frustrated that people continued to consume so much alcohol even after it was banned, federal officials had decided to try a different kind of enforcement. They ordered the poisoning of industrial alcohols manufactured in the United States, products regularly stolen by bootleggers and resold as drinkable spirits. The idea was to scare people into giving up illicit drinking. Instead, by the time Prohibition ended in 1933, the federal poisoning program, by some estimates, had killed at least 10,000 people.

Although mostly forgotten today, the “chemist’s war of Prohibition” remains one of the strangest and most deadly decisions in American law-enforcement history. As one of its most outspoken opponents, Charles Norris, the chief medical examiner of New York City during the 1920s, liked to say, it was “our national experiment in extermination.” 

H/T

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