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The new revelation of DNA-editing, CRISPR technology is still making the headline rounds.

“Some experts predict that the scientists who figured out how to use CRISPR/Cas9 to edit genes will win a Nobel Prize for their discovery.”

This is something that has the potential to redefine humanity. We now harness the ability to alter our own DNA. This includes the ability to battle hereditary disease, but also to splice animal DNA into our own. The most controversial consequence of this technology is that any changes we make will be passed on through each following generation of humanity.

This technology could be a savior from disease, but also it has the potential to literally create new races of humans, or even completely new species.

Source: http://www.latimes.com/science/la-sci-gene-editing-embryo-20150503-story.html#page=1

Source: http://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-genetically-modify-human-embryos-2015-4

the thing is im not saying that dirkjake a is healthy relationship. the two of them have enough issues to sink a cruise liner, and those issues combine and hurt them both. what i am saying is that it is not satan incarnate and it could work if they both communicated properly

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Writing Raffle Prize

Alanna Hawke x Sebastian Vael - Decisions and Proposals

Prize for flockofflamingos! Hope you enjoy!

Sebastian Vael waited in the antechamber outside the office of the viscount. He had important business to discuss with the ruler of Kirkwall; fortunately, the chamber seemed a little brighter since the new viscountess had taken over. The new seneschal walked out of the office and informed Sebastian that the viscountess would see him now. He steeled himself, stood up, and walked into the office, shutting the door behind him.

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At 17, Malala Yousafzai just made history with her Nobel Peace Prize

Pakistani teenager Malala Yousafzai just became the youngest Nobel Prize winner in history.

Yousafzai and Indian children’s right activist Kailash Satyarthi were awarded 2014 Nobel Peace Prize on Friday.

Yousafzai, 17, and Satyarthi, 60, were chose “for their struggle against the oppression of children and young people, and for the right of all children to education,” the Norwegian Nobel Committee said. 

Yousafzai’s inspiring storyFollow micdotcom

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Malala Yousafzai, the Pakistani teen who was attacked by Taliban militants for promoting education for girls, will share the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize with Kailash Satyarthi, an Indian campaigner against exploitation of children.

The Norwegian Nobel Committee says on Nobelprize.org:

“Showing great personal courage, Kailash Satyarthi, maintaining Gandhi’s tradition, has headed various forms of protests and demonstrations, all peaceful, focusing on the grave exploitation of children for financial gain. He has also contributed to the development of important international conventions on children’s rights.

"Despite her youth, Malala Yousafzai has already fought for several years for the right of girls to education, and has shown by example that children and young people, too, can contribute to improving their own situations. This she has done under the most dangerous circumstances. Through her heroic struggle she has become a leading spokesperson for girls’ rights to education.”

Pakistani Teen Malala Yousafzai Shares Nobel Peace Prize

Related: Last year, NPR host Michel Martin talked with Malala and her father about their hope for Pakistan’s future.

Photo: Andrew Burton/Getty Images

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Today, Dr. May-Britt Moser from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) accepts her Nobel Prize in true startorial style. Dr. Moser was awarded the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine together with her colleague (and husband) Edvard Moser and John O'Keefe (of University College London) for discovering grid cells that provide the brain with an internal coordinate system essential for navigation (aka your inner GPS). 

Dr. Moser’s stunning gown was designed by engineer-turned designer, Matthew Hubble. Matthew reached out to us earlier this month about his amazing creation. He believes scientists should be celebrated just as much as movie stars, if not more. We wholeheartedly agree!

After Dr. Moser was announced as a co-winner of this year’s Nobel Prize, he began to research her work and was inspired to design this dress for her. The details represent the neuronal grid of Dr. Moser’s research complete with three large beaded and sequined neurons reaching out to connect with each other across the deep blue fabric.  

For more info on their collaboration, check out Joanne Manaster’s feature for Scientific American (including an interview with Matthew). And you can follow both Dr. Moser and Matthew on Twitter.

We think the result is AMAZING and we are so excited to see a female scientists celebrated in this way. Congrats to Dr. Moser on her Nobel and congrats to Matthew on his incredible gown!

- Summer

(photo credit: Geir Mogen and NTNU)

Malala Yousafzai and Kailash Satyarthi win Nobel Peace Prize

NBC News: Pakistani teen Malala Yousafzai, who was shot in the head by the Taliban for advocating girls’ education, and Indian children’s rights advocate Kailash Satyarthi have been awarded the 2014 Nobel Peace Prize.

Follow more at Breaking News

Photo: Getty Images via NBCNews.com