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NSA Recruiter Grabs Student’s Phone to Stop him from Recording

So a National Security Agency recruiter named “Neal Z.” was manning a booth a University of New Mexico job fair when he was confronted by two students with cameras who began interrogating him about the agency’s spying tactics.

It began with one student accusing the NSA of collecting metadata of all phone calls within the United States, which Neal Z. first denied.

But when the student assured him that the NSA does do this, Neal Z. relented and admitted that it was done under the “legal authority” of the secret FISA court (United States Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court).

The student then pointed out that a congressional panel determined that the collecting of metadata from U.S. phone calls was illegal and unconstitutional as Neal Z. tried to remain smug while displaying a wide-eyed paranoia that this kid knew too much.

“So why is it legal to collect information on every American citizen?” the student asked.

Neal Z. tried to brush him with off by saying, “you don’t understand what that collection is all about and if you don’t leave soon, I’m going to call the university security to get you out of my face.”

Apple said Wednesday night that it is making it impossible for the company to turn over data from most iPhones or iPads to police — even when they have a search warrant — taking a hard new line as tech companies attempt to blunt allegations that they have too readily participated in government efforts to collect user information.

The move, announced with the publication of a new privacy policy tied to the release of Apple’s latest mobile operating system, iOS 8, amounts to an engineering solution to a legal quandary: Rather than comply with binding court orders, Apple has reworked its latest encryption in a way that prevents the company — or anyone but the device’s owner — from gaining access to the vast troves of user data typically stored on smartphones or tablet computers.

The key is the encryption that Apple mobile devices automatically put in place when a user selects a passcode, making it difficult for anyone who lacks that passcode to access the information within, including photos, e-mails and recordings. Apple once maintained the ability to unlock some content on devices for legally binding police requests but will no longer do so for iOS 8, it said in the new privacy policy.

“Unlike our competitors, Apple cannot bypass your passcode and therefore cannot access this data,” Apple said on its Web site. “So it’s not technically feasible for us to respond to government warrants for the extraction of this data from devices in their possession running iOS 8.”

Find meaning. Distinguish melancholy from sadness. Go out for a walk. It doesn’t have to be a romantic walk in the park, spring at its most spectacular moment, flowers and smells and outstanding poetical imagery smoothly transferring you into another world. It doesn’t have to be a walk during which you’ll have multiple life epiphanies and discover meanings no other brain ever managed to encounter. Do not be afraid of spending quality time by yourself. Find meaning or don’t find meaning but steal some time and give it freely and exclusively to your own self. Opt for privacy and solitude. That doesn’t make you antisocial or cause you to reject the rest of the world. But you need to breathe. And you need to be.
—  Albert Camus, Notebooks 1951-1959

“Our ability to act on data that does exist . . . is critical to our success,” Hosko said. He suggested that it would take a major event, such as a terrorist attack, to cause the pendulum to swing back toward giving authorities access to a broad range of digital information.

False flag when?

Apple said Wednesday night that it is making it impossible for the company to turn over data from most iPhones or iPads to police — even when they have a search warrant — taking a hard new line as tech companies attempt to blunt allegations that they have too readily participated in government efforts to collect user information.

The move, announced with the publication of a new privacy policy tied to the release of Apple’s latest mobile operating system, iOS 8, amounts to an engineering solution to a legal quandary: Rather than comply with binding court orders, Apple has reworked its latest encryption in a way that prevents the company — or anyone but the device’s owner — from gaining access to the vast troves of user data typically stored on smartphones or tablet computers. …

“This is a great move,” said Christopher Soghoian, principal technologist for the American Civil Liberties Union. “Particularly after the Snowden disclosures, Apple seems to understand that consumers want companies to put their privacy first. However, I suspect there are going to be a lot of unhappy law enforcement officials.”

Ronald T. Hosko, the former head of the FBI’s criminal investigative division, called the move by Apple “problematic,” saying it will contribute to the steady decrease of law enforcement’s ability to collect key evidence — to solve crimes and prevent them. …

“Our ability to act on data that does exist . . . is critical to our success,” Hosko said. He suggested that it would take a major event, such as a terrorist attack, to cause the pendulum to swing back toward giving authorities access to a broad range of digital information.

He suggested that it would take a major event, such as a terrorist attack, to cause the pendulum to swing back toward giving authorities access

Who are the real terrorists?

“Unlike our competitors, Apple cannot bypass your passcode and therefore cannot access this data,” the company wrote in the new privacy policy. “So it’s not technically feasible for us to respond to government warrants for the extraction of this data from devices in their possession running iOS 8.” The move is a major step meant to reassure people that their privacy is safe on Apple devices.
Disconnecting the Anti-Social Network

Years ago I was reluctant to join Facebook.  But I have to admit, it did help me reconnect with a few people who I had lost touch with.  And, at times, it’s helped me connect with more people about my art and widen my circle a bit.  But in recent years, Facebook has become more and more about algorithms that essentially are designed to make you look at advertising rather than what your friends might have posted.  I don’t know how many times I have heard someone say, “Did you see…….on Facebook?”  Facebook becomes less user-friendly as time marches on and I find it less useful.

In the past week there has been a big push, or should we say putsch, to force drag queens and other performers to use their “real” names – the names that appear on their drivers’ licenses, etc.  While I mostly am known as Tofu, the DMV does not call me that.  Not that the name my parents gave me, Scott, is a big secret.  It’s just that more people know me as Tofu.  I figure it’s a matter of time before my account is suspended.  Well, I am on the docks, have boarded the ship and am leaving the dictatorship of Zuckerbergland. 

There are so many good reasons why people use different names socially, and in some cases there are serious issues where people need to protect their privacy.  For example, one of my friends is a psychologist who uses a pseudonym so his patients are unable to find him on sites like Facebook.  It’s not about being secretive or clandestine.  This is what people like mental health professionals, teachers and even law enforcement might choose to do in order to maintain the social boundaries they are accustomed to creating in their day-to-day worlds. 

Many of my closest friends have always refused to join and many other of my friends on Facebook barely use it anyway.  I don’t need this anti-social network.  I always enjoy hearing from you.  Call me, write a letter, send me a postcard, or a regular old email.  I will continue to post my latest work and news about upcoming art shows on this blog.  Follow me here.  You can also always reach me via my website tofuart.com.

Now, back to making art, or meeting you for coffee…..

Stickers Turn Any Dumb Object Into a Smart One

Estimote stickers are small beacons that can be attached to ordinary objects and help them interact with your smartphone.

The stickers all objects to be tracked instead of people.  For example, place them on individual items in a store and you’ll find out how often they’re picked up or where they are in the store — you don’t need to track the customers themselves.

Each Estimote sticker contains an accelerometer, temperature sensors, a small processor and Bluetooth connector. If an item is picked up, you might be prompted with additional product information via a nearby computer screen or your smartphone.  Kinda feels like Minority Report tracking your eyes.

Stick one on a bag and you’ll know if you left behind (or if it got stolen!). Place one in the bedroom and you can see if users are still in bed….ok, a little creepy, I’ll admit. 

Estimote is calling its stickers ‘nearables’, providing similar benefits to wearables without having to actually be attached to the user.

Are you ready for the Internet of Everything?

Five Eyes’ Quest For Security Has Given Us Widespread Insecurity

You do not have to choose between privacy and security. With robust communications systems, we can have both. Yet intelligence agencies such as GCHQ and the NSA have severely injured both, interfering with our privacy rights while simultaneously jeopardizing our security. Over the past year we have learnt how they try to master the internet by hacking into telecommunications providers, sabotaging encryption standards and deploying malware on our devices.

By infiltrating our communications technologies, governments, who have an obligation to respect and strengthen the integrity of these technologies, have instead eroded the possibility of secure systems. Their activities violate the key principle of “Integrity of  Communications and Systems” of the “International Principles on the Application of Human Rights to Communications Surveillance”.

The Five Eyes’ quest for security has given us widespread insecurity.

Keeping data private is vital in the days of smartphones and the free-floating information they carry. Justin wrote a guide on many of the deeply hidden and sometimes concerning privacy settings in iOS 7. Now we’re back to cover some of the new (and old) privacy settings in iOS 8 that you need to address right now. Don’t Miss: The 33 Best Hidden Features of iOS 8 Problem #1: The Keyboard Is Storing Your Passwords QuickType is Apple’s new predictive text feature for iOS 8, providing several suggestions to finish off words and sentences, nestled right above the keyboard as you type. While

IOS 8 is a creepers paradise. IF you updated please at least look over this

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