I wanted to post this to show you what Romain Gaschet is doing with colours on Gotham Academy. This is low-resolution. The high-res file is so pretty I want to hug him to death.

If Romain isn’t nominated for an Eisner for colours next year I will picket in the streets.

Her blue-eyed summertime smile looks so damn good that it hurts, makes you wanna build a 10% down, white picket fence house on this dirt🎶🎵

“As a teenager, I didn’t understand that saying you’re a feminist is just saying that you hope women and men will have equal rights and equal opportunities. What it seemed to me, the way it was phrased in culture, society, was that you hate men. And now, I think a lot of girls have had a feminist awakening because they understand what the word means. For so long it’s been made to seem like something where you’d picket against the opposite sex, whereas it’s not about that at all. Becoming friends with Lena – without her preaching to me, but just seeing why she believes what she believes, why she says what she says, why she stands for what she stands for – has made me realise that I’ve been taking a feminist stance without actually saying so.”

WPF drabble: Babysitting and the vacation

Ravi makes good on his promise to take Max on a mini-vacation — upstate, to a remote patch of woods where they rent a cabin and go on morning hikes through the mountains. It’s refreshing, and Max delights in being physically active again without the added burden of a copious stomach. Initially, the alpha fusses over him, suggesting they take frequent breaks to rehydrate and snack, but after a few hours, he catches on that his mate is hardier than he initially suspected.

“You’re a tough little omega, aren’t you?” he asks playfully, bronze, sweat-coated skin glistening under the sun’s rays.

Max grins: “You sound surprised. Four kids. Need I remind you?”

He feels giddy from a mixture of alone time with Ravi and natural endorphins from exercise, and the clean mountain air feels crisp in his lungs. In short: everything is wonderful, and yet he misses the kids like a limb, and while they’re only gone two days, they’ve FaceTimed several times already just to check in with them (thankfully, they still have a cellphone signal).

For the most part, they seem fine. Aady is preoccupied with showing off for her uncles, and Charles is busy keeping up with his sister. Beeja is too little to really grasp they’re no longer there, and she’s sated as long as Bengie keeps defrosting the breast milk from the freezer. The only one who seems concerned is Taj, who is old enough to realize they’re gone, but too young to celebrate his independence.

The first time they FaceTimed, Taj saw their faces on the phone and burst out crying, which in turn made Max cry, and Pat desperately tried to calm everyone down back at the house, while Ravi hugged the omega and assured him everything would be fine.

The next time they saw the boy, he had a chocolate popsicle wedged in his mouth and seemed at peace with the world.

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Over the past two weeks, activists in port cities along the West Coast of the United States staged picket lines to prevent or delay vessels operated by Israel’s Zim shipping line from offloading cargo.

The actions had been planned at the height of Israel’s assault on the Gaza Strip that began on 7 July and ended with a ceasefire yesterday.

Zim Integrated Shipping Services Ltd. is Israel’s biggest cargo shipping company and the tenth largest in the world. It’s 2013 revenue was $3.7 billion.

The action originated in Oakland, California, which set a high bar for others to follow. Protestors there successfully prevented the unloading of the Zim Piraeus container ship for nearly four full days.

But other cities’ more modest demonstrations were nevertheless successful in temporarily delaying the Zim ships from unloading, costing the company hundreds of thousands of dollars, building momentum and signalling widespread support for such actions.

As for the endless “is Taylor Swift a feminist?” pieces – well, they can die now. “As a teenager, I didn’t understand that saying you’re a feminist is just saying that you hope women and men will have equal rights and equal opportunities. What it seemed to me, the way it was phrased in culture, society, was that you hate men. And now, I think a lot of girls have had a feminist awakening because they understand what the word means. For so long it’s been made to seem like something where you’d picket against the opposite sex, whereas it’s not about that at all.

anonymous said:

how do you deal with a heartbreak? :(

Swear off guys and girls forever. Spit on couples. Picket outside of flower shops for boys buying flowers for girls. Go to the movies and sit next to a couple and talk to whole time to them. Meet a guy or girl doing the same thing as you. Talk about your hatred for couples. Become good friends and turn that hate into love for each other. Congrats, you’ve successfully got over a heartbreak and possibly back into the cycle

Inside Charlie’s Chocolate Factory: The Complete Story of Willy Wonka, the Golden Ticket, and Roald Dahl’s Most Famous Creation by Lucy Mangan. Foreword by Sophie Dahl. Puffin Books, 2014.

Looking for a nice way to celebrate the 50th anniversary of Roald Dahl’s classic,  Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

Inside Charlies’s Chocolate Factory provides a in-depth look at the life of this classic. From its publishing history to the history of its illustrators to the movie adaptations to the overall impact the book has had on our culture the book will surely add a sprinkle to Dahl cannon.

Who knew that the book was originally published in America and not the UK or that Maurice Sendak was supposed to be the original illustrator but was too busy working on a book called Where The Wild Things Are or that rumors where abound that the NAACP would picket the movie theaters showing the 1971 film version because they were troubled by the title of the book for, at that time, ‘chocolate’ was a derogatory term for black people and that ‘Charlie’ was hipster slang for white people.

Pre Order: Amazon | Powell’s

First Edition of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

1971 film version: Buy

2005 film version: Watch | Buy

When we’re together at home it’s just me and Zayn. I don’t even think of him being in One Direction. He’s just a sweet little boy. His most annoying habit is the fact he doesn’t ever stop singing – he’s even worse than me.
— 

Perrie Edwards

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