peanut-allergy

anonymous asked:

My little nephew is 8 and really loves Fairy Tail, and since he loves Gray he says he thinks Gray would have a peanut allergy (and he says that because he wants to be just like Gray when he grows up). Idk, I just thought it was cute that my nephew is coming up with his own headcanons and wanted to share with someone.

THAT IS THE CUTEST THING EVER OH MY GOSH

Your nephew is tiny Gray Fullbuster it’s official, tell him I confirmed it heheh

WARNING - PLEASE READ IF YOU HAVE A PEANUT ALLERGY AND LIKE TO SHMEAR MAKEUP ON YOUR SKIN TO MAKE YOU LOOK AS FLAWLESS AS YOUR PERSONALITY

I am one such an individual, and last night I was super pumped to try this concealer. Out of curiosity I read the ingredients and saw something called arachidyl behenate.

Anything with the root “arachi” such as “arachis oil” is probably peanut related. And, sure enough, I did some research and arachidyl behenate is peanut-derived. Which is the story of how I nearly smushed a deadly food allergen into my skin.

There’s a report here from last year that seems to indicate that some food allergens are neutralized when processed for cosmetics, but I’m not sure that applies for peanuts. And at any rate, they did indicate there was still a risk of a reaction if such proteins weren’t processed properly.

Now, I’m gonna say it outright - I’m not one hundred percent sure that a heavily processed peanut-derived chemical such as arachidyl behenate will cause a reaction. I’ve worn a lot of makeup over the years without checking the ingredients, so I could have easily used a product containing it without knowing. Still, better safe than sorry.

Alternate names for peanut products (anything with the prefix “arachi-” should be considered suspect):

beer nuts, earth nuts, goobers, groundnuts, groundnut oil, hypogaeic acid, katchung oil, mandelonas

A full list can be found here, another cosmetic-specific one here.

Here’s some articles on the subject:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11558642

http://www.national-toxic-encephalopathy-foundation.org/peanuts-in-cosmetics/

http://cosmeticsinfo.org/ingredient/hydrogenated-peanut-oil

http://www.ewg.org/skindeep/ingredient/700482/ARACHIS_HYPOGAEA_(PEANUT)_OIL/

Stay safe, guys, and please signal boost for any peanut-allergic followers you might have!

Please fire me. I am sure my next workplace would love to know you wrote me up for giving a man, who was going into anaphylactic shock, some benadryl.  Yep, it says “dealing drugs” in the write up.

Feeding Babies Foods With Peanuts Appears To Prevent Allergies

Babies at high risk for becoming allergic to peanuts are much less likely to develop the allergy if they are regularly fed foods containing the legumes starting in their first year of life.

That’s according to a big new study released Monday involving hundreds of British babies. The researchers found that those who consumed the equivalent of about four heaping teaspoons of peanut butter each week, starting when they were between 4 and 11 months old, were about 80 percent less likely to develop a peanut allergy by their fifth birthday.

“This is certainly good news,” says Gideon Lack of King’s College London, who led the study. He presented the research at the annual meeting of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology. It was also published in The New England Journal of Medicine.

Continue Reading.

Teal pumpkins signal safe Halloween treats for kids with allergies

Halloween can be scary for children with severe food allergies.

But this year families in Chicago and beyond are reaching out to kids who can’t eat peanuts, milk or other common allergens by putting a teal-colored pumpkin on their front porches as a signal that they are handing out treats that are safe.

Peanut allergy researchers say they may have found key to a cure

Australian researchers have found a possible key to a cure for people with potentially fatal peanut allergies.

A Melbourne-based study has already transformed the lives of many of the children who took part in the clinical trial.

Researchers from the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute gave about 30 allergic children a daily dose of peanut protein together with a probiotic in an increasing amount over an 18-month period.

The probiotic used in the study was Lactobacillus rhamnosus and the dose was equivalent to eating about 20kg of yoghurt each day. At the end of the trial 80% of the children could eat peanuts without any reaction.

“Many of the children and families believe it has changed their lives, they’re very happy, they feel relieved,” said the lead researcher, Mimi Tang. “These findings provide the first vital step towards developing a cure for peanut allergy and possibly other food allergies.”