outrage

It’s amazing to me how many “ear to the ground” folks I know have spent so ugh time posting about Beyoncé but still aren’t spreading awareness about #kendrickjohnson . This 17 year old #blackboy was killed on school grounds in #Valdosta Georgia and everyone from the school to the cops to the coroner to the funeral home to the media is complicit in the #coverup . #CNN has been the only news outlet that has followed the story and tried to get the family some answers. HELLO PEOPLE this #blackbody is symbolic of how we as #blackpeople are still seen. THEY FILLED HIS BODY WITH NEWSPAPER! Look at his face! They tried to say he only suffocated?! How when he looks like #emmettill ?! If you can post about how wonderful Beyoncé is or anything else THEN SURELY you can share this story and spread awareness. The coverup is only working because people aren’t informed. The more people know, the more pressure can be put on the town. The US Attorney and FBI are involved but it’s not enough. Where are his rallies? His songs? His poems? Why is his image not being shared across the country? Across the world? Where is the #outrage

we should just get a ouija board and ask victor hugo what the barricade boys first names are b/c the fact that he couldn’t be bothered to give them but he can write 100 pages on the french sewer system is egregious and unacceptable 

Sexism is everyone’s problem, but many continue to ignore the fact that we are not two separate species and paint it as a women’s issue, to the point where you can reliably predict that any given news article about sexism will inevitably talk about how ‘women are outraged.’ No, you know who’s outraged? Anyone with fucking common sense.
Blue and black dress enrages users of Internet

A photograph of a horrid blue and black dress enraged Twitter Thursday evening as the online-o-sphere was rent into two camps: those who believe the dress in question to be blue and black, which it is, and those who believe the dress to be white and gold, which it is not. The photograph of the blue and black dress is below.

Warning: No matter what you decide—blue/black, white/gold, or don’t care—looking at this photograph will soon cause you to feel alienated from large swaths of the human race.

It’s strange that people see such different colors in this T.J. Maxx clearance rack mess, and stranger still that both camps are so assured of their correctness. The owner of the original Tumblr Livejournal weblog posted another photo of the unflattering outfit, showing its blue and black color scheme clearly:

In other news Thursday, the FCC approved new regulations that were viewed as a major victory for net neutrality. In the hours since, our society has dedicated untold bandwidth to a llama chase and an apparel-based optical illusion. It’s as if people took the $100 bill of newly assured Internet freedom and used it to light a cigar. What better way to celebrate? Llamas and dresses and tweets and tumbles—tonight we revel in asinine bullshit, because we can.

More at avclub.com

If you’re unscathed about the police officer who shot and killed an unarmed 18-year-old not getting indicted for it, then you’re probably a little disturbed that a New York man was choked to death on camera, and his choker will never go to trial for the incident. And if you’re not mad about those two deaths, then you’re probably upset that a cop shot a 12-year-old boy holding a toy gun on a playground last week. If none of these stories trigger a little bit of outrage from you, WOW. Good job on not having emotions, Spock. Do you kiss your mother with that icy robot mouth?

Ferguson, Eric Garner, and Why Death Should Outrage Us

We live in an era of opinions. In the Internet economy — in which I am a loyal and grateful participant! — loud voices are more than just currency, they’re coal. The Outrage Industrial Complex burns all day and all night with Twitter as its blistering engine room. A constant stream of fuel is necessary to keep the entire enterprise afloat, and so any event, be it the collapse of a government or the cancellation of a sitcom, is greeted with a near instantaneous torrent of reaction.
— 

The Internet Has a ‘Louie’ Problem

About “Louie,” but strangely, broadly relevant.

It's real

I don’t usually do this on this blog, but I have to comment on this.


I for one have no problem with the sudden influx of posts about Ferguson.
People are outraged.
They should be outraged.
I am outraged.

If you are not outraged, you are part of the problem. This world will never start getting better if we don’t start giving a shit about each other instead of the fleeting, petty bullshit that we let rule our privileged, self important lives.

Start caring before it’s too late.

Nigeria

In Nigeria over the past couple of days THOUSANDS of people have been killed in different attacks. Just today a 10 year-old girl, who has barley started her life was forced to wear a bomb and sent into a market place. The bomb killed her and 20 others, 19 seriously injured.

Yet, I turn on the news and they’re reporting on Taylor Swifts new boyfriend or Supermarket deals.  I mean, what the fuck is wrong with the world that we’d prefer to pay more attention to The Golden Globes than the bloody genocide that’s happening in some of these countries.

These are REAL people. Think about your brothers, sister, mothers, fathers etc being blown up, or executed, when they’re just trying to have a good life. 

They need help. 

The last time Lou Pelletier spoke with his 15-year-old daughter was Feb. 14 — Valentine’s Day. For this father of four, though, the day held a different meaning for his youngest valentine: It marked one year since she was taken and placed in a psychiatric ward against her parents’ will.

“We need help,” Lou Pelletier told TheBlaze in an exclusive interview, explaining why he made the decision to break a judge’s gag order and talk about the situation.

“I’m trying to save my daughter’s life,” he said.

“While still being able to live,” Jessica, one of Justina’s older sisters, added.

For more than a year, Justina Pelletier has been the center of a battle between her parents, the Massachusetts Department of Children and Families and Boston Children’s Hospital, and two controversial medical diagnoses. After her family began speaking out last November about their fight against these major institutions in court, they were placed under a gag order.

Beyond little snippets given outside of court on the many hearings they’ve had, little has been heard from the parents who believe their daughter has mitochondrial disease and the medical facility that says she doesn’t, saying it’s a psychosomatic disorder instead.

But now the Pelletiers are speaking out.

When the Pelletiers brought Justina to a Connecticut hospital in February 2013, she was suffering from the flu. As her sister Jessica explained it, people with mitochondrial disease are affected by illnesses, like the flu, in a more pronounced way.

Jessica, 25, is the second-oldest of the Pelletiers’ daughters and has mitochondrial disease herself. The disease can manifest itself in various ways, but at its root, results from a defect in the mitochondria, an organelle inside cells that produces energy. Jessica’s diagnosis was established medically through analysis of the cells of her muscle tissue.

In Justina’s case, a doctor evaluated her symptoms, considered her family history — mitochondrial disease can be inherited — and gave her a clinical diagnosis of the disorder. Under the care of physicians at Tufts Medical Center, Justina was treated for mitochondrial disease.

But when she got the flu and her parents were told she should be transferred to Boston Children’s Hospital, things changed.

As Lou Pelletier explained it, Justina was supposed to be transferred in an ambulance, for insurance purposes, to the Boston hospital, and brought through the emergency room but seen by a gastrointestinal doctor. Instead, upon arriving, he said she was stopped and evaluated by a neurologist, who, Pelletier said, didn’t look at her medical history or contact her other doctors. This doctor, according to Justina’s father, said he thought the illness was all in Justina’s head — that it was somatoform disorder.

The physicians at Boston Children’s Hospital disagreed with her diagnosis of mitochondrial disorder and wanted to take a different approach to her treatment. At first, Lou Pelletier said, “we were game to try a new approach.” But when the hospital laid out their plan to take Justina off all of her mitochondrial and pain medication, her parents balked.

That was Feb. 13, 2013. The next day — Valentine’s Day 2013 — Justina’s parents went to Boston Children’s Hospital with a couple of advocates intending to have her discharged and brought to Tufts. Instead, they were met with security guards and served a 51A, a report of alleged physical or emotional abuse.

Lou said when he saw security showing up, he called 911, thinking that things were not about to go in their favor.

“I told them ‘my daughter is about to be kidnapped by Boston Children’s Hospital,’” he said.

The Pelletiers were accused of overmedicalizing their daughter. Lou Pelletier pointed out that he doesn’t see how having a congenital band removed, her tonsils taken out, procedures to help her have bowel movements — a reoccurring issue for Justina — and following doctor’s orders for prescriptions for mitochondrial disease can be considered overmedicalizing.

Justina was transferred to Boston Children’s Hospital’s Bader 5 psychiatric unit on April 9, 2013. There she was treated for somatoform disorder. According to a document from Boston Children’s given to the Pelletiers, Justina’s treatment included a “behavioral plan […] formulated with input from all relevant disciplines which will day schedule, feeding and functioning plans with a therapeutic approach.” Physical therapy was included as well.

Another measure on the “Guidelines for Care of Justina Pelletier” included that “no diagnostic tests and no new consultations are to be requested unless Justina develops a new or acute process as observed and assessed by the medical team.”

The Pelletier family isn’t necessarily alone in their experience with the hospital. After their case made national headlines, other families began speaking out about the hospital threatening to get DCF involved. Complaints that have been filed since against Bader 5 prompted the Massachusetts Department of Public Health to launch an investigation.

Lou Pelletier told TheBlaze he used to play “20 questions” on the phone to learn from Justina what was going on in the psych ward on the days they were scheduled to call. Justina also used to sneak little notes to her family in cards she wrote them.

Jessica Pelletier demonstrated how she would fold a flap in cards and write messages in small handwriting underneath. Lou Pelletier said if Justina got caught doing this “she would get tortured,” which he said the hospital called “behavioral modification.”

“That’s what Kim Jong Il’s doing in North Korea, behavior modification. … No, no, no, no. It’s torture,” he said.

The Pelletiers don’t get cards anymore. All they get from Justina now are 20 minutes on the phone every Tuesday, one-hour visits each Friday, and her bracelets, which show her preferences for the colors blue and green. Both Lou and Jessica Pelletier sported several of Justina’s beaded or artistically twisted rubber band bracelets on their wrists.

After several court dates, Justina was moved from Boston Children’s Hospital to another facility in Massachusetts. At the time, Lou Pelletier said “justice maybe prevailed.” But in the hearing following this decision two weeks later, things seemed more grim from the Pelletiers’ perspective. Lou Pelletier said it is not a medical facility. He said it’s a temporary place where she is being held until her treatment going forward can be agreed upon in court.

“Now we go back the 24th, a week from today, and I want to have all my guns blazing. We’re not going to make it much more,” Lou Pelletier said.

“Our family,” Jessica Pelletier said, “I don’t know how we survived this long.”

And they’re not just talking about the “heartbreak” of Justina. The yearlong fight to bring the decisions regarding her medical care back to her parents has taken a toll on the Pelletier family.

Financially, they’re trying to make ends meet with expensive legal fees. The Pelletiers have a PayPal account connected to www.freejustina.com for those wishing to donate to her family’s cause.

If the decisions regarding Justina’s care are returned to her parents, Lou thinks she needs total rehabilitation, saying that he worries her current state could be “irreversible.”

“She needs physical therapy. She needs to be back on the vitamin cocktail. She needs to be treated for the goddamn diagnosis she had from the beginning,” Lou said. ”I need to save my daughter. If we don’t do something, she is going to die.”

On the Glenn Beck Program Monday night, Lou Pelletier said he and his wife, Linda, continue telling Justina to hang in there.

“I never thought of all my daughters that she would be my hero,” Lou said on TheBlaze TV, telling Beck that he has been amazed by his daughter’s strength, even as he has seen her condition deteriorate. “She needs to be this country’s hero.”