opinion**

So i posted about a site i found that pays you in Visa, Amazon, and iTunes gift cards just to fill out surveys, and everyone kept asking… “does it work.” Well sign up and find out for your damn self, i’m not your slave… but yes it does. I even linked you, i’m a saint smfh *drops mic*

anonymous asked:

Hey! Love your blog! With the whole "adorable personality" comment Dan made to Phil, I've noticed Dan compliments Phil's personality often. Have you noticed that or just me? Also I can't find it but there was a video where he said he thought "Phil's personality was better than anyones" or something? It's so obvious how much he admires him. I think it's really sweet.

I definitely agree. As much as people give Dan a hard time for jokingly messing with or “picking on” Phil, I think he has always 100% been his biggest fan. I’m not even attempting to reference the origin of how they met and the fact that Dan was literally a fan, but rather the way you can so clearly tell he thinks the absolute world of him.

The video you are looking for was “A Chat with Dan Howell” posted on Bertie G’s channel. It is now removed but there is still the copy of it on vimeo that you can watch here  . Note: race is randomly brought up so please watch for context or else this could sound terribly wrong. Bertie is intentionally asking ridiculous questions to make the interview seem uncomfortable. B: “You’re both white…why is that? Why don’t you live with a black person?” D: “Uhh It’s not skin deep…Phil’s personality could be inside any skin case.” B: “Are you saying Phil’s personality is better than any black person’s in the world. Is that what you just said?” D: “Maybe…for me…personally…yes.” While the video was intended to be sort of awkward and a bit of a joke, I did not interpret anything funny or fake about Dan’s answer. “Phil’s personality could be inside any skin case” is really a lovely thing to say. He believes Phil’s personality to suit him best of anyone. Outer appearance makes no difference.

Dan has always seemed to find a way to sneak in little compliments for Phil. Between his subtle sweet comments during the radio show, his tendency to give unprovoked praise of Phil and his work across social media (especially those random twitter replies to fans) and the many statements on younow, it is clear that “your personality is too adorable” does not symbolize even half of it.

Dan seems to place high value on individuality and it is clear that this is something he strongly admires in Phil. I get the sense that he he is very drawn to uniqueness and the qualities that make people “different” and set them apart. He certainly does not view conformity as something to aspire to. One example that first came to mind was in regards to appearance. How many times has he shot down Phil’s comments about thinking of cutting his hair or getting a quiff with “no, you’ll look like everyone else.” While this is just a superficial example, I think it gives insight into his fear of blending in and the appreciation he has for eccentricity. Phil embodies a lot of that ideal. His quirkiness paired with an unabashed “I just am who I am” mentality is truly refreshing. He doesn’t apologize for who he is and instead embraces and owns that part of his personality. I think this is incredibly attractive to Dan. Whether as a friend or something more, I would guess that he finds those traits to be of great appeal. (cont)

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A childhood friend of mine who is now a rabbi recently told me that the most powerful one-line prayer he has ever read is: “Let me not die while I am still alive.” I would have never understood that prayer before losing Dave. Now I do.

I think when tragedy occurs, it presents a choice. You can give in to the void, the emptiness that fills your heart, your lungs, constricts your ability to think or even breathe. Or you can try to find meaning. These past thirty days, I have spent many of my moments lost in that void. And I know that many future moments will be consumed by the vast emptiness as well.

But when I can, I want to choose life and meaning.

— 

Thirty days after her husband’s death, Sheryl Sandberg shares this unbelievably beautiful and touching meditation on grief

Poet Elizabeth Alexander, whose beloved husband died as suddenly as Sandberg’s, has also written about the journey of loss beautifully

Tips to order better coffee...

I care about you guys too much to let you drink bad coffee.

- Order an 8 ounce Americano.
Most coffee shops put 2 shots of espresso in an Americano. If you order a bigger size, you are just getting more water (which is fine if that is what you want). 2 shots of espresso for every 8oz is a much better ratio than, say, 2 shots of espresso to 16oz of water where you have diluted the coffee quite a bit.
If you want a 12oz, ask for 3 shots
16oz, 4 shots, etc.

- Order an 8oz latte.
For the same reason as above, only substitute water for milk.
A larger latte is just getting you more milk for the same amount of coffee.


- Order your cappuccino ‘for here’
A traditional cappuccino is a very specific size. Typically 5~6 ounces.
Most shops have cappuccino cups for this purpose.
If you order a cappuccino to go, you are forcing the barista to make it at least 8oz. At that point you have ordered a foamy latte.
Also, if you order a 12, 16, or larger cappuccino, it is just a foamy latte

- A real macchiato is extremely different from the starbucks 'caramel macchiato’
If you are at a specialty coffee shop and you order a macchiato expecting a large sugary drink, you’re going to be surprised.
Macchiato means 'marked’ or 'stained’ and a macchiato is straight up espresso 'marked’ with a tiny bit of steamed milk.
(I don’t know why starbucks uses this title for a caramel latte)

- If you order a pour over, try it black.
Most people add cream to their coffee because they find it harsh or bitter.
Pour over coffee has a much smoother and cleaner taste and you might be robbing yourself of the flavor when you add cream.

Everyone is all over this Caitlyn Jenner thing and how she’s not a real hero because she isn’t military or anything like that.

Like, do people not understand that there are different kinds of courage and bravery? Struggling daily in your head with the fact that your body doesn’t reflect who you really are for 50+ years and then finally feeling comfortable enough to show the world who you really are is brave. It is courageous.

Just because a battle isn’t happening on a literal battlefield doesn’t make it any less of a fight. You aren’t any less brave or courageous because your battle is happening within you.

To erase the possibility of empathy is to erase the possibility of human progress. Erasing the possibility of empathy also threatens to erase the possibility of art.
— 

Wisdom from Amanda Palmer’s altogether excellent essay for New Statesman, from the issue on “saying the unsayable,” which she edited together with her husband, Neil Gaiman. The magazine is available on Kindle and well worth it. 

Also see Brené Brown on the crucial difference between empathy and sympathy.

Like the femme fatale, the homme fatal is a spy. But instead of baiting our lead with desire, the male version tends to use security to entrap the leading lady. On “The Blacklist” and “Orphan Black,” romantic interests Tom and Paul — played by Ryan Eggold and Dylan Bruce, respectively — pose as a catalog husband or boyfriend: supportive, affectionate, built like professional athletes, with just a bit of stubble. (On “Scandal,” Jake — a hunky secret agent — is similar, but Olivia Pope is in love with the president, who, as leader of the free world, is the one civilian qualified to woo a superhero.) Underneath the model exterior, these men are sent to monitor the protagonist and report back to her enemies. The sultry blonde at the bar flirts; the strong-yet-snuggly boyfriend gaslights. While the male detective’s dilemma is “Does she want me, or does she want something from me?” the female superhero is forced to wonder, “Does he love me, or does he want to control me?” The latter is the deeper betrayal and makes for very suspenseful TV.
Natsu is not E.N.D, he is N.D

…at the present. In my opinion, the big reveal of E.N.D  (that everyone saw coming) and their shared bloodline by Zeref (that no one saw coming) does not negate the fact that Natsu, whatever his 400+ year history was and whatever his foreshadowed future will be, is presently the adorable dork that was raised by Igneel and is the driving passion and force of Fairy Tail. Sometimes I get a little uncomfortable when I see Natsu labeled as E.N.D so easily. It feels like an unnecessary incrimination on the guy no matter what the situation. Lol Natsu eats food, no wait, it’s actually E.N.D who’s eating (his fiery soul from the inside at the same time). Even more ominous…is the fact that Happy has been sleeping next to a demon his whole life, so he actually serves as his evil neko-chan servant mind-controlled to his demon will…

Jokes aside, it’s clear that the demon E.N.D and our Natsu are two different beings, as the demon side of Natsu has yet to be reawakened.

What we know for certain is that our dragonslayer was born as Natsu and died when he was a little boy. To my knowledge, after Zeref revived him with black magic as E.N.D, we don’t actually know what the brothers were doing. What was their goal - were they creating demons to fight against dragons, were they trying to take over the world, or were they merely living as brothers trying to start a new life as normal as possible until Zeref wanted to die? Whatever their intentions, one day Natsu, Zeref, and Igneel met, battled, the book of E.N.D was sealed (perhaps by the “one magic”), and Natsu was reborn again as the child of Igneel.

Natsu changed Igneel’s life for the better and I have no doubt that when E.N.D is revived, it will be love that saves him, love from his brother, his family, friends, and Lucy’s one true magic. But until then…it’s Natsu we have been seeing, not his no doubt sexy demon alter-ego.

Some of you may have heard about what happened in the top 8 draft at GP Vegas, and some of you may not have. Let me break down what happened and why you should be angry.

Lets start from the beginning. Pascal Maynard is drafting in the top 8 of the biggest GP in Magic’s history. He’s solidly in red/white, and he opens a foil Tarmagoyf and a Burst Lightning. After much internal debate, he takes the goyf (https://youtu.be/RhOVfR0gslA). He loses round one to a Burst Lightning, one that he could have had in his deck. Now let’s see what his peers (none of whom made it into the top eight mind you) had to say.

Owen Turtenwald - “You disgust me @ PascalMaynard”

Huey Jenson - “I just lost all respect for Pascal Maynard”

Even Reid Duke, famous for being one of the nicest and most level-headed pro players, said “I’ve devoted my life to Magic, it’s very disappointing to see one of my peers would sell out for so little”

Now personally, this pisses me off. Maynard isn’t as rich or supported as other pros, he took the goyf as a guaranteed way to pay to participate in future GP’s. Burst Lightning could not offer him the same guarantee (see his full response at https://t.co/Ro8wPmmNDV).

Others took a more practical approach to the situation, like Brian Kibler - “If making a draft pick that isn’t the best for your deck is disrespectful of the game, we’d have to condemn far more than Pascal”

Foil Goyf is averaging ~$350 on TCGPlayer, so with the top eight stamp, Pascal was probably expecting $400-500 out of it. He put it on ebay and is giving half to proceeds to charity ( http://m.ebay.com/itm/261911963536?_mwBanner=1) and as of posting this, it’s going for $16,569 with six days of bidding to go.

Winner of the tournament only made $4k before taxes.

All quotes are taken directly from Twitter.

How chill is your Umineko fave?

12 /10 Ice cold and absolutely flawless

11 /10 Impeccably chill

10/10 Honestly, probably more chill than they should be in their circumstances

9 /10 Suspiciously chill, like snow in June, or some shit

8 /10 Pleasantly chill, like a cool breeze

7 /10 Acceptably chill

6 /10 Not actually chill at all, but fully capable of faking it

5 /10 Highly variable levels of chill

4 /10 Pretends to be chill but we all know the truth

3 /10  Tried to be chill once, but kinda hated it

2 /10  Has never been chill a goddamn day in their lives

1 /10  Absolutely no chill whatsoever

0 /10  Literally Anti-chill. “Chill” is but a myth this person once heard of

-1 /10 A walking chill deficit. Other people’s chill is drawn into them, only to be absorbed, negated, and never seen again

So I want to address a certain group of people who are crying out about the rape on Outlander versus Game of Thrones. As we all know, this season, Game of Thrones showed a non-canon rape against Sansa Stark. There was outrage about this. I was one person that was outraged about the backward character development and shock-value violence against a woman on screen. Game of Thrones is all about violence and politics and has had a lot of gratuitous rape scenes not canon to the books (Daenerys and Drogo on screen, Jaime and Cersei Lannister in Season Four). This rape of a main character was obviously a last straw for several people. There was reason for the outrage. It was seen as a lazy plot device meant to further along the story of Theon Greyjoy and ten steps back for Sansa Stark. Now people are complaining that Outlander fans who complained about the Sansa rape should be decrying the rape shown on screen of Jamie Fraser by Black Jack Randall. Calling those of us that aren’t rallying against it, hypocrites. Why? Because we aren’t screaming out about it.

The thing is, what happens between Black Jack Randall and Jamie Fraser is in the books. It’s described in great detail, all of the things that happen between these two men. In the books, it was very visceral and difficult to get through. It was disturbing and gut wrenching. It was sob-worthy. It was also very key to the character of Jamie Fraser, who is influenced by this event for the rest of the series, most especially in book two, three, and four. It was cannon where the Sansa scene was not.

I think the real issue is, while Game of Thrones used a gratuitous scene of sexual violence against a woman, the focus was not on the victim, but rather on the man forced to watch the exchange. The camera did not show the graphic depiction of the horror taking place for Sansa Stark, instead focusing on the tears rolling down Theon/Reek’s cheeks at being forced to watch the exchange. He was the victim we were supposed to consider in that episode. Not Sansa Stark. Her rape was just a plot device to further Theon’s story.

Outlander handled rape differently. Instead of just panning away, it shoved it down our throats. It showed us how rapists get off on the power they have over their victims. It showed BJR trotting away from a broken and shattered Jamie with a look of satisfaction on his face. It showed BJR breaking Jamie down piece by piece by piece. Not only did it show the power of BJR, but it showed the vulnerability of Jamie. Sansa Stark’s character was very weak in the beginning, spoiled, selfish and impulsive and she was on her way to becoming stronger before being victimized yet again in one of the worst ways a woman can be victimized. Jamie is shown as strong and manly and stubborn from the very beginning. From what I can tell this episode was meant to show how even strong men, who are stubborn and proud can be broken down and waste away into a shell of their former selves. It shows how rape, at it’s most violent, can utterly destroy someone. Unlike nearly every other rape scene on television, it shows the gritty repercussions of what rape can do to it’s victim. The haunting looks, the PTSD, the emotional and physical trauma of losing your will, and having someone else degrade you in the worst way possible.

You will get no outrage from me over what happened in Outlander. It was in the books and honestly, while terrible and horrible and disturbing, I knew that it was something that had to happen. Honestly though, it was handled better than what I thought it might. To take that scene from the books and barely look at it, or pan over it quickly, cheapens that scene somehow. By showing it so much, by showing the screams and the torture and the breakdown, we are deeply affected by it. Jamie is deeply affected by what’s happened to him, and by seeing it, we too, are left with that impression of him losing control and losing his pride and his strength. We understand how truly horrible he was treated, and his reasons for wanting to end his life.

If it had been handled differently, it might well of been a joke. Just like male on male rape has been treated as a joke in the past (think the jokes made about Deliverance). Hell, even male on male love scenes are poked fun at or treated with disgust by some of it’s audience (outrage over homosexual scenes in Game of Thrones, and movies like Brokeback Mountain). It’s very difficult for viewers to poke fun at this, to make light of it. And in a way that’s good. From what I have seen, sexual assault victims of both genders, have said the scene portrayed is very similar to how they felt. That it was a terrible thing to watch, and perhaps triggering to some, but ultimately they appreciated it because it was a very honest representation of their own personal nightmares and was not treated lightly.

So there will be no outrage from me for the honest portrayal of how rape affects it’s victim. There was nothing gratuitous in this finale episode of Outlander. The violence and the rape, necessary if not hard to get through. It was a very real depiction of rape and violence. And for non-book readers, we tried to warn you without giving it away. We understand that you might want to not watch any more after this, that it might be to much for you. But for us fans of the books, it’s part of the story. A necessary evil that was explored in a very respectful and honest way. At least that is my humble opinion on the matter.

Don’t call us hypocrites though, for not crying out in rage and anger over the depiction of rape when we did so in Game of Thrones. Game of Thrones is an entirely different entity, geared more toward a male audience than a female one. While they are both rated M for mature, and fantasy shows on premium cable networks, that is about where their similarities end.

Follow Me on Twitter: @GracieMac91
Join our Outlander Discussion Group on Facebook: OutlanderSassenach

i feel the same about being worried shinoa/yuu will be a thing?

like, and not because im a mikayuu shipper, ill actually be quite fine if they dont end up together either because their bond in general will always be super strong anyway.

and i love shinoa but i really despise forced hetero romance hah and honestly the small shinoa/yuu hints and the mINISCULE mitsuba/yuu ones (like wtf why even add those??) are just HORRIBLY FORCED and u cant deny that. i mean cmon shinoa wasnt?? interested in yuu really at all imo from what i could see and then guren just like outta the heckin’ blue says “or did u really end up falling in love w/ him” and oh !!! suddenly feelings!! i just? uh…no? what? ????? why their friendship was so good why

yuu and mikas love for eachother (family or not O: !) is reasonable and not forced because, well, we all know why. it feels natural because they were like family at one point (still are but for a while they didnt see eachother and ye). the rest of the romantic/love plots thrown in dont…but u know, theres gotta be some hetero romance in everything right, so why not just force the main girl we have who is a total badass and strong character on her own to be the main charas love interest?

thats my MAIN problem with shinoa/yuu, and why i cant ship it.

i love owari no seraph but dang i hope they dont focus on that. even just a little.

To the person on my Facebook that said Caitlyn Jenner is not a hero in comparison to Military folks,

That’s like comparing apples to oranges. That’s like saying anyone who doesn’t put their life on the line for others can’t be a hero.

I think there are many different kinds of heroes in this world. Military heroes for their country, Caitlyn Jenner and Laverne Cox are heroes for all the trans community which suffers losses every second, kids fighting incurable diseases and illnesses are heroes, people adopting animals are heroes to those rescue pets, people adopting kids, fostering kids, etc. there are so many kinds of heroes. And I believe Caitlyn Jenner is still a hero despite what you say.

Everyone is a hero in their own way.

Sincerely,
Me.

My Writing and Blogging Tips

Since the beginning of this blog I have been asked for all kinds of advice and on several different occasions I have given it. The problem is, this led to people reading one post and then asking more questions that I had already answered in a different post, so I’ve come up with a solution: The Ultimate Guide. Here, I will post the best of my writing tips, the best of my blog tips, and even a step-by-step how-to guide for adding pages. So if you’ve found yourself looking for some help with those things, then by all means, read on! :) And holy balls, it’s LONG!

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Best wishes” goes back centuries, but the standalone best first appeared in 1922. The earliest version of it in an American letter, per the Oxford English Dictionary, came from F. Scott Fitzgerald: “Zelda sends best,” he said in a note to the literary critic Edmund Wilson. It crept further down the page throughout the 20th century; the first-known usage as a closing was in a 1968 missive to the writer Larry L. King that ended, “Best, Bill.” Even then it read cold: King criticized the idea, calling it “real buddy-buddy.
— 

Interesting, if disquieting, piece by Rebecca Greenfield on why “very best” is the very worst email signature, concluding that what is actually best is no signature at all. 

I get the rationale, but a big part of me feels that this is simply uncivil. 

Yes, we may have shifted significantly from the 19th-century etiquette of letter writing, but unless we want to make a complete travesty of correspondence, which Virginia Woolf aptly called “the humane art,” we might want to reconsider these subtle but important tokens of civility and warmth. I agree with the article’s assertion that “Sincerely” sounds “just fake,” but sincerity is something one is made to feel, not something one is told to feel – there are ways to come up with a signature that is warm and sincere and true to the sender’s personhood. To completely give up on trying seems to me if not a complete failure of the imagination, then at the very least a kind of laziness. 

Perhaps we still have something to learn from Lewis Carroll about how to make email more civil.