vimeo

Poppy Project: Time lapse of Poppy’s assembly

The Poppy project aims at building an open source humanoid robot and an interdisciplinary community to promote Science, Art and Education.
This video was shot during the assembly of our last Poppy. The actual duration of this assembly was around 7 hours.

The final choreography has been done during the “Êtres et numérique” residency. The code which makes move the robot is available on Github: bit.ly/TJOpGS
You can watch the performance video on vimeo.com/92281019; more information is available on our forum (forum.poppy-project.org/t/artist-residency-etres-et-numerique).

More info on
poppy-project.org
forum.poppy-project.org
github.com/poppy-project

Music crédit:
Four Tet - Moma : soundcloud.com/four-tet/four-tet-moma
Buy it on itunes (bit.ly/1igIb6u) or amazon (amzn.to/1mmOnOr).

For anarchists, though, free software is attractive not because of the legal provisions of its production process, but primarily because it contains gratis, high- quality alternatives to the proprietary and monopolist software economy. The latter, already on an early critique, represents “a special form of the commodification of knowledge…the special properties of knowledge (its lack of material substance; the ease with which it can be copied and transmitted) mean that it can only acquire exchange value where institutional arrangements confer a degree of monopoly power on its owner” (Morris-Suzuki 1984) — i.e. intellectual property rights. One may add that these are more than mere “institutional arrangements”, since they can be encoded into the technology itself as access-codes for software packages or online content. On such an optic, the collaborative development of free software like the Linux operating system and applications such as OpenOffice clearly approximate an informational anarchist communism. Moreover, for anarchists it is precisely the logic of expropriation and electronic piracy that enables a radical political extension of the cultural ideals of the free manipulation, circulation and use of information associated with the “hacker ethic” (Himanen 2001). The space of illegality created by P2P (peer- to-peer) file-sharing opens up the possibility, not only of the open circulation of freely- given information and software as it is on the Internet today, but also of conscious copyright violation. The Internet, then, enables not only communist relations around information, but also the militant contamination and erosion of non-communist regimes of knowledge — a technological “weapon” to equalize access to information, eating away at intellectual property rights by rendering them unenforceable.

free open-source mathematics software system licensed under the GPL. It builds on top of many existing open-source packages: NumPy, SciPy, matplotlib, Sympy, Maxima, GAP, FLINT, R and many more. Access their combined power through a common, Python-based language or directly via interfaces or wrappers. 
Mission: Creating a viable free open source alternative to Magma, Maple, Mathematica and Matlab.

Working In Public From Day 1

By Eric Mill

In the wide world of software, maybe you’ve heard someone say this, or maybe you’ve said it yourself: "I’ll open source it after I clean up the code; it’s a mess right now."

Or: "I think there are some passwords in there; I’ll get around to cleaning it out at some point."

Or simply: "No way, it’s just too embarrassing."

These feelings are totally natural, but keep a lot of good work closed that could easily have been open. The trick to avoiding this is simple: open source your code from day 1. Don’t wait for a milestone, don’t wait for it to be stable — do it from the first commit.

Here are a few reasons why you should feel good about working in the open from the moment your shovel goes in the ground:

No one’s going to read your code. Your code is almost certainly boring. Most code is. Instead, people will evaluate your work based on how they’d interact with it. Is it easy to learn how to use it from the README? Is development active? Have many GitHub users starred it? And none of that will matter until your project is far enough along that it’s useful. You will not be in the spotlight until you deserve to be.

You will make better decisions. At the most basic level, you will be vastly less likely to accidentally commit a password to an open source project than a closed one. But more than that: even though no one is reading your code, you’ll still feel a bit of natural pressure to make better decisions. You’ll hardcode less, and move more into configuration files. You’ll make things slightly more modular. You’ll comment more. You’ll catch security holes more quickly. That’s a healthy pressure.

It will not waste your time. It may feel like some of those “better decisions” take more time. But even if you’re the only person who will ever work on this project, you have to live there. You’ll greatly and immediately appreciate having made those decisions the minute you return to your own code after taking a month off. And when making better decisions becomes routine, they stop taking more time — and you become a better coder.

You might just help people. And people might just help you! The internet is a big place and a small world, and GitHub has a way of making unexpected connections. If your work is even a little bit useful to someone else, there’s a good chance they’ll find their way to your door, start poking around, and find a way to be useful right back. Even if you’re working on what you think is the most niche project that no one else would ever use: leave the door open for providence.

Once you get used to beginning your work in public, it stops feeling like performance art and starts feeling like breathing. It’s a healthy routine that produces better work and personal growth, and opens the door to spontaneous contribution and engagement. When your default is open, everyone wins.

Interoperability Plugfests around the world

Plugfests provide free, hands-on help to developers and quality assurance engineers who want to test Windows and Office products and make them work with the systems at their companies. A critical aspect of Microsoft product development is an ecosystem dedicated to shipping interoperable systems—and these plugfest-type events are great opportunities to work closely with other vendors and open source communities, providing extensive documentation and sessions dedicated to testing and feedback.

Check out these upcoming Plugfests!

Beijing Interoperability Seminar 2015

March 16-17, Beijing, China

The Microsoft Interoperability team will be hosting a two day event in Beijing, China. Implementers from all over the region are invited to attend to experience talks given by the Microsoft subject matter experts and much more. The seminar will focus on a developer level audience who work with Microsoft’s Open Specification technology. Teams from Office, Windows, and OData will be present at the event to offer a comprehensive view into Microsoft interoperability. Remaining space is limited, so make sure to register soon.

Taipei Interoperability Protocols Plugfest 2015

March 24-26, Taipei, Taiwan

The Microsoft Interop team is hosting a three-day interoperability seminar in Taipei. Get the latest on Windows 10, Windows Server, Office 365, Office, OData, Power BI, Query, Pivot, BYOD, and other cross-platform integration from technical experts.

Protocols Plugfest

May 12-14, Zaragoza, Spain

The Microsoft Interoperability team will be attending the first-ever Protocols Plugfest in Zaragoza, Spain. This industry- and community-driven interoperability event will showcase open source offerings, Microsoft interoperable products and technologies, and interoperable industry solutions.

Samba XP

May 19-22, Gottingen, Germany

The Microsoft Interop team will be in Germany to participate in SambaXP 2015. Top Microsoft subject matter experts will be present to answer your questions. Meet the SAMBA team, discuss requirement and new features, and get an update on current developments.

Redmond Interoperability Protocols Plugfest 2015

June 22-26, Redmond, Washington, USA

The Microsoft Interop team will be hosting a five-day Plugfest in Redmond, Washington. Talks by Microsoft subject matter experts will cover the latest on Office, SharePoint, Exchange, Data Platform, Windows protocols and file formats, and more. You’ll have a chance to explore in-depth testing scenarios with new protocol test tools and engage one-on-one with Microsoft interoperability support engineers. Email plugfests@microsoft.com with your ideas for the event!

18F: An Open Source Team

By Raphael Majma and Eric Mill

At 18F, we place a premium on developing digital tools and services in the open. This means contributing our source code back to the community, actively repurposing our code across projects, and contributing back to the open source tools we use. For a variety of reasons, we believe that doing so improves the final product we create. It is because of this that our policy is to:

  1. Use Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) in our projects and to contribute back to the open source community;
  2. Create an environment where any project can be developed in the open; and
  3. Publish all source code created or modified by 18F publicly.

FOSS is software that does not charge users a purchase or licensing fee for modifying or redistributing the source code. There are many benefits to using FOSS, including allowing for product customization and better interoperability between products. Citizen and consumer needs can change rapidly. FOSS allows us to modify software iteratively and to quickly change or experiment as needed.

Similarly, openly publishing our code creates cost-savings for the American people by producing a more secure, reusable product. Code that is available online for the public to inspect is open to a more rigorous review process that can assist in identifying flaws in the source code. Developing in the open, when appropriate, opens the project up to that review process earlier and allows for discussions to guide the direction of a products development. This creates a distinct advantage over proprietary software that undergoes a less diverse review and provides 18F with an opportunity to engage our stakeholders in ways that strengthen our work.

The use of open source software is not new in the Federal Government. Agencies have been using open source software for many years to great effect. What fewer agencies do is publish developed source code or develop in the open. When the Food and Drug Administration built out openFDA, an API that lets you query adverse drug events, they did so in the open. Because the source code was being published online to the public, a volunteer was able to review the code and find an issue. The volunteer not only identified the issue, but provided a solution to the team that was accepted as a part of the final product. Our policy hopes to recreate these kinds of public interactions and we look forward to other offices within the Federal Government joining us in working on FOSS projects.

In the next few days, we’re excited to publish a contributor’s guide about reuse and sharing of our code and some advice on working in the open from day one.

Figure Drawing Session

Medium : Digital Painting
Software : Krita

Nothing beats a nice figure drawing session to get back to the drawing board ! I’ll only post the two figures I’ve rendered, along with some steps. About 1h25 for the female; 1h45 for the male. It feels so good to draw again :D

References : Poses for Artists - Proko.com
Also on : DeviantArt

youtube

AKER is an open source, modular urban agriculture system. We share tools that help build ecologically resilient, healthy communities.

http://www.aker.me/