northfield-minnesota

This pamphlet was given to a student who visited the crisis pregnancy center in Northfield, MN. Add your name to our petition to call on the director of the CPC to stop distributing materials that mislead and lie about health care.

CPCs pose as legitimate reproductive health centers. They have a track record of outright lying to women and work to dissuade people from exercising the right to choose.

A pro-choice student wrote a letter-to-the-editor about a crisis pregnancy center near his school in Minnesota.  CPCs pose as legitimate reproductive health centers. They have a track record of outright lying to women and work to dissuade people from exercising the right to choose. 

Here’s what we think of the oh-so-professional email the CPC’s director sent back. 

This pamphlet was given to a student who visited the crisis pregnancy center (CPC) in Northfield, MN. Add your name to our petition to call on the director of the CPC to stop distributing materials that mislead and lie about health care.

CPCs pose as legitimate reproductive health centers. They have a track record of outright lying to women and work to dissuade people from exercising the right to choose.

anonymous asked:

I don't know if you are still answering Carleton related questions, but I thought I'd ask. Is Carleton academically demanding? I'm looking for a school that will be a challenge for me, and I love the atmosphere of Carleton from what I've learned so far. However, as far as academic difficulty, I've gotten mixed reviews. What are the classes like and what sort of structure does a typical schedule have?

Of course I am still answering Carleton questions!  I am a rising senior, after all…to be honest, I’ll probably still be answering Carleton questions after I graduate…

Is Carleton academically demanding?  Well, to put it simply, YES.  Carleton is extremely academically rigorous.  A lot of effort goes into maintaining good grades.  This includes attending classes, doing outside work (readings and written work alike), and actually engaging with the subject.

If you are looking for a challenge, Carleton definitely has it for you.  The ‘challenges’ I’ve encountered have all been fun hell, if that makes any sense.  Something another one of my friends chipped in just now that should be mentioned is that the academic workload is what you make it.  If you want to make straight A’s, you will be working from here to the moon every night.  If you want to do well in school but are okay with, well, not getting straight A’s, you will be working for a few hours every day.  This method leaves room for fun stuff, like all of the extracurriculars Carleton has to offer.  Doing well at Carleton is very much a balance between time you’d like to dedicate to academics versus time you’d like to spend socializing and participating in non-academic activities.

The classes vary, but something that the majority of them have in common is that they are all very small.  Each class normally has 25 students or less in it.  The professors engage with you directly and genuinely want you to learn.  They push you to do your best.

A typical schedule for a Carl is normally very busy.  My days consist of going to my work-study job, going to class, doing a bit of homework every night, and then going to whatever extracurricular I have that night (I have a lot of them).  This is typical for many Carls, but not all.  Some people don’t have work-study jobs.  Some don’t do their work (bad ideas).  Some don’t really do that whole extracurricular thing.  Whatever you choose to do is what makes your schedule what it is.  

Please, feel free to ask more questions.  I love this school and will happily answer, give or take a few days. :)

Story Of Cole Younger

Story Of Cole Younger
Born near Lee’s Summit, Missouri, Thomas Coleman (“Cole”) Younger (1844-1916) rode with William Clarke Quantrill’s Confederate raiders during the Civil War, participating in many daring and bloody exploits, including the infamous Lawrence, Kansas, massacre of 1863. Following the war, Younger continued his celebrated career as a desperado, robbing banks and trains with Jesse James and other members of the James-Younger gang. A fateful attempt in 1876 on the Northfield, Minnesota, bank sent Cole to the state prison in Stillwater, Minnesota for decades. There he became a model resident, helping both to protect women convicts during a fire and found the Prison Mirror, a newspaper intended to shed “a ray of light upon the lives of those behind the bars.” Paroled in 1901, Younger successfully sought a pardon, operated a Wild West show with his old comrade Frank James, and lectured on “What My Life Has Taught Me.”

anonymous asked:

Hey I've got a Carleton question! (You're talking about the university in Minnesota, right?) Anyways, I'll regress here, but how do the courses compare to regular universities in difficulty? Is it much more rigorous, or fairly similar? Thanks for your time x

Hello young prospective student!

Sorry for not answering sooner; things have been absolutely crazy here in the north.  I finished my finals, started working my full time job at Carleton, and then had to work reunion weekend (the one weekend out of the entire year when alumni flood campus and crazy shit goes down).  Yes, I’ve been quite busy.

First off: Yes, I am talking about Carleton College, the liberal arts college in Northfield, Minnesota.  It’s not a university (thank God), but it is rather well known for it’s size and demands much from it’s hard-working students.

I’ve taken a few courses outside of Carleton (mostly in high school), and I can honestly say that Carleton demands more than larger schools.  The fact that you get a professor for a classroom of 20 or so kids who works personally with you and pushes you to do your best has a lot to do with it.  Carleton prides itself on being the best in undergraduate teaching in the nation, and strives to keep that record (although last year we lost our first place bid to Davidson, another very good school).

So, short answer, yes, it is much more rigorous here than at larger schools.  However, your time here at Carleton is what you make it.  If you choose to relax a bit and make academics less of a priority, you’ll make B’s.  If you really work at a class (say, maybe, you love the subject and the work for it is genuinely fun), you’ll make A’s.  A’s here have to be earned, regardless of the class.

Feel free to ask more questions if you’d like!  Sorry for the hella delay :/

The Minnesota House declined to hear a bill before spring recess that would restore voting rights to the 47000 people in MN who have been disenfranchised by the criminal “justice” system.

This petition asks the Senate to do some convoluted legislative branch thing that I’m not too clear on that would force the House to hear the bill.

If you’re proximally or ultimately from Minnesota, please sign this petition from MN Neighborhoods Organizing for Change

Northfield

During my childhood, I never paid much attention to all the shops along Division St. To my young eyes, Northfield’s main drag was static and familiar. There was occasional turnover, a mainstay would close amidst a collective gnashing of teeth over the decay of small town America driven by Big Box chains. Mostly, though, things stayed the same: people bought Birkenstocks at The Rare Pair, donuts at the Quality Bakery, and candy at the Cocoa Bean. Even after I went away to college, Division St. still felt the same when I came back for summer vacations.

Showing Arden around after years away forced me to reacquaint myself with many places I’d long ago written off as unremarkable. It turns out that the VFW post is surprisingly large for a small college town. The cheap-looking pizza place is, inexplicably, still in business. Knick-knack stores are legion, and each of them opened in the last 3 years.

The biggest revelation for me was that, as far as I know, Northfield has never had a good restaurant. I grew up on a steady diet of homemade meals that incorporated ingredients from our expansive organic garden. My family almost never went out to eat, and restaurants rarely came up in our conversations. After four years in San Francisco surrounded by an abundance of delicious food (everything from Rosamunde Sausage to State Bird Provisions), I had begun to take it for granted that there would always be good food near by.

Sure, Northfield has Hogan Bros (sub sandwiches) and Blue Monday (a coffee shop) and they’re both still going strong after 10+ years in business. But neither offers delicious, interesting food and sit-down dinner. For a place that considers itself cultured, it boggles the mind that Northfield doesn’t have even one “foodie-style” restaurant. There are no artisanal cheese boards, handcrafted cocktails, seasonal offerings, or farm-to-table tasting menus. In the meantime, residents and visitors alike will have to endure unremarkable delivery pizza and take-out from bland strip mall outlets.