nontheism

as an athiest, I can’t serve office in 6 states, it’s illegal

a study by the university of oregon shows that people distrust atheists as much as they distrust rapists

atheists have statistically lower employment rates

people have been fired on the suspicion that they were irreligious

people have been denied custody of their children due to a lack of religious beliefs

people have turned away volunteers at soup kitchens, animal shelters, homeless shelters because working alongside a godless person was too much

in 2011, a billboard advertising someone as an atheist was declared “violating free speech rights”

the university of notre dame, an college with many multi-faith organizations, refuses to allow “atheist, agnostic or questioning” students in

the boy scouts of america has lifted their ban on lgbt+ scouts, den mothers and troop leaders but has no intention to lift its ban on atheists

it is almost impossible for an atheist to blend in smoothly to the major populus without violating their beliefs- praying, saying the pledge etc

in arkansas, i wouldn’t be allowed to serve as a witness in court, it’s illegal

there are seven countries where atheists can be imprisoned under law

there are seven countries where you can be executed for being an atheist

tell me more about how atheists aren’t discriminated against

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New Atheism
-noun
Historically ignorant labrats rehashing century-old arguments that have been debunked by Christians hundreds of times over, in a logical format less convincing then when the first barbarians announced them, who bow down to the papacy of peer review and self-defeating dogma of naturalism while accusing non-atheists of the same irrationality, and while accusing their opponents of misunderstanding their view when they spend no time studying their opponent’s, all the while pretending to be rational skeptics of everything*.

*By the way, they’re a collection of sparkly space shit (ref. Sagan) who happen to be conscious

How to be a successfull Atheist

  • Pretend that the term “religion” actually means something from an anthropological view.
  • Mix science, ontology, epistemology and metaphysics in a jumble in your arguments.
  • Pretend that atheism is somehow connected with science.
  • Pretend that theism always has even a remote likeness from case to case, and that theists usually have an Abrahamic view of deity.
  • Make no distinction between theist, nontheist, suitheist or other views on Deity, or solipsist, acosmic,realist, idealist, empirist, rationalist or other ideas.
  • Pretend that atheism is a form of “knowledge” as opposed to a belief / conviction.
  • Try to convert everyone to the “true” belief.
  • Pretend that all theists take their mythology literally.
  • Pretend that all theists belive in an “alternative” to scientific explanations and evolution.
  • Just go on and on and on having a theological discussion mixed with a scientific one, disregarding ontologies and metaphysical distinctions.
  • Fundamentalism is “them”, common sense is “us”.
  • Proselytize, proselytize,proselytize.
The difference between theism and nontheism is not whether one does or does not believe in God… Theism is a deep-seated conviction that there’s some hand to hold: if we just do the right things, someone will appreciate us and take care of us… Nontheism is relaxing with the ambiguity and uncertainty of the present moment without reaching for anything to protect ourselves.
—  Pema Chödrön, an American Buddhist nun

glittergluegirls asked:

Can you be non theistic and still be a Wiccan

With initiated Wicca I’m inclined to say no, because belief in the God and Goddess are cornerstones of that religion. Neo-Wicca is a bit more free form and there are so many sects of differing beliefs that I think yes, it’s possible. Though you’d most-likely still have to honor the traits the God and Goddess represent, but not necessarily belief that they are literal deities.

If you completely eliminate the God and Goddess from the religion it kind of stops being Wicca and you’re really just doing your own thing religiously.

~Wanderings

I find it facinating how atheists now become just as intolerant,uneducated,fundamentalistic and fanatic as Christians.

They spew hate, hijack science, rewrites history and use the same silly semantics.

When they talk of “religion” they really describe Christianity (or at best Abrahamic religions).

Nobody takes them more serious than they themselves do and everybody with even half an hour of study in Ontology and / or Epistemology knows that their belief is no more than that, a belief. Put some rituals and practices to it and you have yet another nontheistic religion.

Grassroots Humanism & Atheism for a Better World

As a Humanist, I’m interested in promoting a better life for all people. This means understanding the various ways in which injustice affects people’s lives, as I discussed in my previous post “Humanism & Oppression,” and acting to redress that injustice.

Some of the most exciting work by Humanists and atheists is being done in groups that deserve wider recognition. Media coverage tends to stick close to the large national nontheist organizations. Sometimes this attention usefully highlights important initiatives undertaken by these organizations. Too often, however, media, driven by biases toward dramatization & polarization, emphasize controversy at the cost of accurately describing the diversity of lived atheisms in the US.

Even specialized media, such as Religion News Service, seem to be more interested in the drama of The Latest Controversial Thing Richard Dawkins Said than in covering the people whose audiences are far smaller than that of Dawkins’. Chris Stedman, also at Religion News Service, has done good work promoting more diverse views, though even he gets pulled back into the gravity well of Dawkins controversy.

On Twitter, from time to time, I like to promote what I call grassroots atheism & Humanism—that is the smaller nontheist groups whose work engages the social justice issues I consider an essential part of Humanist practice. I want to expand beyond 140 characters here to provide a list for future reference of those organizations whose voice merits amplification, especially in terms of what gets coverage when the media wants to discuss atheism in America.

The list is in alphabetical order. As I’m addressing failures in US media coverage of US atheism in this post, the list is limited to US organizations, though there are many exciting grassroots atheist groups globally as well. The groups listed are (1) active on social media and (2) engaged in one or more area of social justice in addition to normalizing atheism and reducing anti-atheist stigma. 

The list is in no way comprehensive, and I will add new groups as I become aware of their work, which ranges from advocacy and education to community programs and support.

Image credit: Jon Hurd (CC BY 2.0)

How to be a successfull Atheist
  • Pretend that the term “religion” actually means something from an anthropological view.
  • Mix science, ontology, epistemology and metaphysics in a jumble in your arguments.
  • Pretend that atheism is somehow connected with science.
  • Pretend that theism always has even a remote likeness from case to case, and that theists usually have an Abrahamic view of deity.
  • Make no distinction between theist, nontheist, suitheist or other views on Deity, or solipsist, acosmic,realist, idealist, empirist, rationalist or other ideas.
  • Pretend that atheism is a form of “knowledge” as opposed to a belief / conviction.
  • Try to convert everyone to the “true” belief.
  • Pretend that all theists take their mythology literally.
  • Pretend that all theists belive in an “alternative” to scientific explanations and evolution.
  • Just go on and on and on having a theological discussion mixed with a scientific one, disregarding ontologies and metaphysical distinctions.
  • Fundamentalism is “them”, common sense is “us”.
  • Proselytize, proselytize,proselytize.
Behold, The Six Types of Atheists

How many ways are there to disbelieve in God?

At least six, according to a new study.

Two researchers at University of Tennessee at Chattanooga found that atheists and agnostics run the range from vocally anti-religious activists to nonbelievers who nonetheless observe some religious traditions.

“The main observation is that nonbelief is an ontologically diverse community,” write doctoral student Christopher Silver and undergraduate student Thomas Coleman.

“These categories are a first stab at this,” Silver told the website Raw Story. “In 30 years, we may be looking at a typology of 32 types.”

Silver and Coleman derived their six types of nonbelievers from 59 interviews. We’re pretty sure we’ve spotted all six in our comments section.

1) Intellectual atheist/agnostic

This type of nonbeliever seeks information and intellectual stimulation about atheism.

They like debating and arguing, particularly on popular Internet sites.

(Ahem.)

They’re also well-versed in books and articles about religion and atheism, and prone to citing those works frequently.

2) Activist

These kinds of atheists and agnostics are not content with just disbelieving in God; they want to tell others why they reject religion and why society would be better off if we all did likewise.

They tend to be vocal about political causes like gay rights, feminism, the environment and the care of animals.

3) Seeker-agnostic

This group is made up of people who are unsure about the existence of a God but keep an open mind and recognize the limits of human knowledge and experience.

Silver and Coleman describe this group as people who regularly question their own beliefs and “do not hold a firm ideological position.”

That doesn’t mean this group is confused, the researchers say. They just embrace uncertainty.

4) Anti-theist

This group regularly speaks out against religion and religious beliefs, usually by positioning themselves as “diametrically opposed to religious ideology,” Silver and Coleman wrote.

“Anti-theists view religion as ignorance and see any individual or institution associated with it as backward and socially detrimental,” the researchers wrote. “The Anti-Theist has a clear and – in their view, superior – understanding of the limitations and danger of religions.”

Anti-theists are outspoken, devoted and – at times – confrontational about their disbelief. They believe that “obvious fallacies in religion and belief should be aggressively addressed in some form or another.”

5) Non-theist

The smallest group among the six are the non-theists, people who do not involve themselves with either religion or anti-religion.

In many cases, this comes across as apathy or disinterest.

“A Non-Theist simply does not concern him or herself with religion,” Silver and Coleman wrote. “Religion plays no role or issue in one’s consciousness or worldview; nor does a Non- Theist have concern for the atheist or agnostic movement.”

They continue: “They simply do not believe, and in the same right, their absence of faith means the absence of anything religion in any form from their mental space.”

6) Ritual atheist

They don’t believe in God, they don’t associate with religion, and they tend to believe there is no afterlife, but the sixth type of nonbeliever still finds useful the teachings of some religious traditions.

“They see these as more or less philosophical teachings of how to live life and achieve happiness than a path to transcendental liberation,” Silver and Coleman wrote. “For example, these individuals may participate in specific rituals, ceremonies, musical opportunities, meditation, yoga classes, or holiday traditions.”

For many of these nonbelievers, their adherence to ritual may stem from family traditions. For others, its a personal connection to, or respect for, the “profound symbolism” inherent within religious rituals, beliefs and ceremonies, according the researchers.

My mom just told me that last night, while she was out to eat with my grandparents for my grandma’s birthday, my grandma decided to use that time to tell everyone that she is now agnostic.

My grandma, 78, has come to the conclusion that she is agnostic now.

I love my grandparents.

I am so sick of hearing about these movies about christianity and how their god isn’t dead and shit. Quit trying to shove it in people’s faces, you don’t see movies about how a flying spaghetti momster is actually there, so just stop before flying spaghetti monster movies become a thing to protest your movies.

The difference between theism and nontheism is not whether one does or does not believe in God… Theism is a deep-seated conviction that there’s some hand to hold: if we just do the right things, someone will appreciate us and take care of us… Nontheism is relaxing with the ambiguity and uncertainty of the present moment without reaching for anything to protect ourselves.
—  Pema Chödrön
Theism through the Atheist's Looking-Glass

I recall as a theist reviewing the blurred groupings of ‘agnostics’ and 'atheists’ with vague interest; however, the similarities were all too great, and I generally lumped them into one category. A word Google’s spellchecker fails to recognize– nontheists– I later applied to them.  As it turns out, nontheism is a different doctrine entirely, compatible with both religion and a lack thereof. Not unlike Google’s spellcheck, I failed to recognize the intricacies and realism behind a word I did not understand; as a Christian, I misunderstood atheism generalized the term such that it was inclusive of agnostics, theological cognitivists, gnostic atheists, and every school of thought in between. 

As a theological noncognitivist who disregards most definitions of God, I suffer from the reverse problem: the similarities between theists are outstanding. Although I appreciate the insights this perspective brings, I am wary of its disadvantages. I have lost a significant portion of my ability to empathize with the religious and divisive and lack understanding with regard to the schisms and corresponding denominations of religious traditions. I struggle with determining whether my viewpoint is valid or merely the product of apathy. 

Nevertheless, there is a notable similarity between atheism and theism in their most basic forms: that of faith. The theist has faith in the existence of God, while the atheist places faith in the reverse; this distinguishes the agnostics and the igtheists.