10

"To be focused and dedicated to doing one simple thing can perhaps be the most transformative thing. That as narrow as it is, it can be infinitely deep." —Louise Despont

New in the ART21 New York Close Up series: Artist louisedespont creates intricate pencil-on-paper drawings using architectural stencils in her home and studio in Fort Greene, Brooklyn.

WATCH: Louise Despont Draws Deep

IMAGES: Production stills from the ART21 New York Close Up episode, Louise Despont Draws Deep. © ART21, Inc. 2014.

9

"I think of trash as a record of existence. They’re the archeological evidence of the present moment. History is permeating everything, whether you know it or not." —Abigail DeVille

New in the ART21 New York Close Up series: Artist Abigail DeVille stalks the streets of Harlem with a trash-laden push cart, creating temporary sculptural interventions along the way.

WATCH: Abigail DeVille’s Harlem Stories

IMAGES: Production stills from the ART21 New York Close Up film, Abigail DeVille’s Harlem Stories. © ART21, Inc. 2014.

8

"Artists are some of the savviest, inventive people. They have to manage a really illogical pursuit. The rest of the world is a lot more logical. Every artist I know is dealing with a lot of stress, and a lot of desire, and a lot of curiosity."
—Diana Al-Hadid

Before hosting the second film in Art21’s new Artist to Artist series, artist Diana Al-Hadid made her Art21 debut in August 2012 with a film from the New York Close Up series. The film, Diana Al-Hadid’s Studio Boom, featured the artist and her team at work in the artist’s Williamsburg studio producing the sculpture, Nolli’s Orders (2012), for its MASS MoCA debut.

WATCH: Diana Al-Hadid’s Studio Boom

IMAGES (except top): Production stills from the New York Close Up film, Diana Al-Hadid’s Studio Boom. © Art21, Inc. 2012.

TOP IMAGE: Diana Al-Hadid, Nolli’s Orders, 2012. Steel, polymer gypsum, fiberglass, wood, foam, paint; 264 x 228 x 122 inches. Installation view: Invisible Cities, MASS MoCA, North Adams, MA. Courtesy the artist and Marianne Boesky Gallery. © Diana Al-Hadid.

8

"We’re in the age of the remix. There’s no such thing as originality anymore. Now it’s just about how you use information around you to generate your individuality."
—Jacolby Satterwhite

New film in New York Close Up: Artist Jacolby Satterwhite dances with himself—or, rather, his selves—transporting characters from his own 3D virtual worlds into the streets of New York City.

WATCH: Jacolby Satterwhite Dances with His Self

TOP IMAGES: Production stills from the New York Close Up film, Jacolby Satterwhite Dances with His Self. © Art21, Inc. 2013. BOTTOM IMAGE: Jacolby Satterwhite, Reifying Desire 3, video still, 2012. Artwork courtesy of the artist and Monya Rowe Gallery, New York.

9

"I remember times in my high school when I felt really shy. If this is the alter ego to a shy side, then I really want them to look and sustain that vision. Being inside that display case, I could roll my structure right up to an audience member, and I had the license to do this in a way I would never have if I weren’t performing. Maybe for once, I get to be the bully." —Bryan Zanisnik

New in the ART21 New York Close Up series, artist Bryan Zanisnik describes how he draws from family and personal history in creating a work, while also shown performing A Woman Waits For Me II (2014) with his parents at Pace University in Lower Manhattan.

WATCH: Bryan Zanisnik Keeps It in the Family

IMAGES: Artist Bryan Zanisnik performs in a display case on wheels for his performance A Woman Waits For Me II (2014) at Pace University, New York, 2014. Production stills from the ART21 New York Close Up episode, Bryan Zanisnik Keeps It in the Family. © ART21, Inc. 2014.

10

"It’s a fiction and a truth at the same time, and it was that transformation that really drew me to photography."
—Daniel Gordon

New in New York Close Up: Artist Daniel Gordon is shown in his DUMBO studio photographing paper collages constructed from found images downloaded from the Web.

WATCH: Daniel Gordon Gets Physical

IMAGES: Production stills from the New York Close Up film, Daniel Gordon Gets Physical. © Art21, Inc. 2013.

8

"I’m presenting my struggle—my own paranoia or neurosis…. It’s still from this totally personal, fallible point of view." —Shana Moulton

In the 50th film from Art21’s New York Close Up series, artist Shana Moulton and composer Nick Hallett collaborate on the opera Whispering Pines 10—rehearsing and performing this one-act production at the New Museum as part of the Rhizome New Silent series.

WATCH: Shana Moulton & Nick Hallett Stage An Opera

IMAGES: Production stills from the Art21 New York Close Up episode, Shana Moulton & Nick Hallett Stage An Opera. © Art21, Inc. 2014.

10

"Knowing when to stop, knowing when to say no…all these rules that aren’t written down for you, and you have to figure it out yourself through trial and error—and I’m learning as I go." —Jacolby Satterwhite

New in Art21’s New York Close Up series: Artist Jacolby Satterwhite works down to the wire on his latest animation, Reifying Desire 6 (2014), leading into its premiere at the 2014 Whitney Biennial. The artist is shown at work at Recess, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, and the Whitney Museum of American Art.

WATCH: Jacolby Satterwhite Is Going Public

IMAGES: Production stills from the Art21 New York Close Up episode, Jacolby Satterwhite Is Going Public. © Art21, Inc. 2014. Artwork courtesy OHWOW Gallery, Los Angeles and Mallorca Landings Gallery, Spain.

10

"Constructing a space and telling a story became more interesting to me than what the actual object was." —Abigail DeVille

The ART21 New York Close Up series introduces three new artists to the roster today: Louise Despont, Bryan Zanisnik, and, in a film premiering here today, Abigail DeVille.

In the film, DeVille constructs an interactive installation used as the set for a performance of Adrienne Kennedy’s play, She Talks to Beethoven (1989), at the JACK arts center in Clinton Hill, Brooklyn.

WATCH: Abigail DeVille’s Flair for the Dramatic

IMAGES: Production stills from the ART21 New York Close Up episode, Abigail DeVille’s Flair for the Dramatic. © ART21, Inc. 2014.

7

"It’s not fully about the predicament of history. It’s about what you’re able to author yourself and how you’re able to form the future rather than living purely in the past."
—Rashid Johnson

Kick off the first weekend of the new year with inspiration from artist Rashid Johnson, as featured in one of the first episodes from Art21’s New York Close Up series.

WATCH: Rashid Johnson Makes Things to Put Things On

IMAGES: Artist Rashid Johnson in his Williamsburg, Brooklyn studio, 2011. Production stills from the New York Close Up film, Rashid Johnson Makes Things to Put Things On. © Art21, Inc. 2011.

7

"I’m not trying to denounce the visual past. It just seems impossible to me to be able to keep making the same image that I made six years ago."
—Eddie Martinez

New film in New York Close Up: Greenpoint, Brooklyn-based artist Eddie Martinez discusses the motivation to shift his paintings from Pop-like figurations to pared down abstractions.

WATCH: Eddie Martinez’s Risky Business

IMAGES (except bottom): Eddie Martinez in his studio, Greenpoint, Brooklyn, 2012. Production stills from the New York Close Up film, Eddie Martinez’s Risky Business. © Art21, Inc. 2013.

IMAGE (bottom): Eddie Martinez, Matador #7 (Withdrawn), detail, 2013. Installation view at The Journal Gallery, Williamsburg, Brooklyn, 2013. Production still from the New York Close Up film, Eddie Martinez’s Risky Business. © Art21, Inc. 2013.

6

"It doesn’t matter that we know it’s fake—it still has a pretty intense impact on us psychologically. We’re rehearsing for emotions through this material constantly."
—Liz Magic Laser

How can changing the context for a performance alter its meaning? In a new film from Art21’s New York Close Up series, artist Liz Magic Laser directs a group of actors performing theatrical scenes in public locations throughout New York City, as seen through her works chase (2009–10) and Flight (2011).

WATCH: Liz Magic Laser’s Guerrilla Theater

IMAGES: Production stills from the New York Close Up film, Liz Magic Laser’s Guerrilla Theater. Artwork courtesy of the artist.

9

"I wanted to show the works as running out from confinement and then being free. Just go where ever they wanted to go. They’re sitting on walls as if they found a good place to stay for a little while."
—Marela Zacarías

New film in New York Close Up: Artist Marela Zacarías moves a suite of sculptures titled Supple Beat (2013) from the Brooklyn Museum to different spaces throughout the borough—with one sculpture eventually ending up at a friend’s loft in Williamsburg.

The sculptures were based on the WPA-commissioned Willamsburg Murals from the late 1930s, which were rediscovered in the late 1980s, restored, and are currently on view at the Brooklyn Museum. Zacarías’s sculptures were created as part of the museum’s on-going Raw/Cooked series.

WATCH: Marela Zacarías’s Work Finds A Good Home

IMAGES: Sculptures by Marela Zacarías from the artist’s Supple Beat (2013) series, in various states of install and deinstall, 2013. Production stills from the New York Close Up film, Marela Zacarías’s Work Finds A Good Home. © Art21, Inc. 2013.

9

"Making these large works, what concerns me the most is how to get you to pay attention to weight and volume and space and interiors and exteriors. I want to make something that seems really improbable."
—Diana Al-Hadid

New film from the New York Close Up series: Artist Diana Al-Hadid creates sculptures and drawings that embrace illusionism and the unknown, culminating in the exhibition The Vanishing Point (2012) at Marianne Boesky Gallery in New York.

Shown here are the works “Suspended After Image” (2012), “At the Vanishing Point” (2012), “Untitled” (2012), “Divided Line” (2012), and “Antonym” (2012), all installed at Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York, in late 2012.

WATCH: Diana Al-Hadid’s Suspended Reality

7

"It operates as an image as you walk around it, but it’s also deeply physical. That duality—and the emotion that is brought up by that—is the thing that I am most interested in."
—Erin Shirreff

New film in New York Close Up: Artist Erin Shirreff discusses sculptor Tony Smith as an inspiration for a pair of works: her first video work, Sculpture Park (Tony Smith) (2006), and her first public sculpture, Sculpture for Snow (2011). The latter was commissioned by Public Art Fund for their exhibition, A Promise Is a Cloud (2011–12), at MetroTech Commons in Downtown Brooklyn.

WATCH: Erin Shirreff & Tony Smith Go Way Back

IMAGES: Production stills from the New York Close Up film, Erin Shirreff & Tony Smith Go Way Back. © Art21, Inc. 2013.

Today, we are excited to announce the addition of seven new artists to our New York Close Up series roster:

Debo Eilers, Daniel Gordon, Laleh Khorramian, Mary Mattingly, Meleko Mokgosi, Jacolby Satterwhite, and Marela Zacarias

Read an introduction from the series co-creator and co-producer, Nick Ravich, and watch the first film featuring artist Laleh Khorramian on the New York Close Up website.

Artists in image, in clockwise order: Laleh Khorramian (on swing), Marela Zacarias, Mary Mattingly, Meleko Mokgosi, Daniel Gordon, Debo Eilers, Jacolby Satterwhite.

This Friday, June 21, Art21 (June 21? Art21!?) will add seven new artists to the New York Close Up series roster.

The first film from the new round will premiere on the same day, and subsequent films will be released throughout the coming months.

Until then, watch a promo spot for the upcoming year of New York Close Up, put together by our friends at Crux Design Studio.

WATCH: New York Close Up Series Trailer, Year 3 (2013)

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