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From deep within the Newsweek archieve comes this first person account penned by Muhammad Ali himself and his reflections on the storied “Rumble in the Jungle.”

Take a walk down memory lane with us 40 years later.

“The greatest fight I ever had was the Thrilla in Manila against Joe Frazier in 1975. But the greatest thing I ever did was not going to Vietnam. People said to me, “Boy, you’ve got a lot of nerve.” I said, “You’re going to Vietnam, you’re probably going to get killed. You’re the one with the nerve, not me.”

But the Rumble in the Jungle was a fight that made the whole country more conscious. I wanted to establish a relationship between American blacks and Africans. All the time I was there, I’d travel to the jungles, places where there was no radio or television, and people would come up and touch me, and I could touch them. The fight was about racial problems, Vietnam.”

Get the whole story at Newsweek.com

An issue of Newsweek titled ‘Bugs About Beatles’ was released on February 24,1964 an excerpt from the article said, “The big question in the music business at the moment is: will the Beatles last?  The odds are that, in the words of another era, they’re too hot not to cool down, and a cooled-down Beatle is hard to picture.  It is also hard to imagine any other field in which they could apply their talents, and so the odds are that they will fade away, as most adults confidently predict.” …don’t think so folks!

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New York City’s five boroughs first became Jeff Chen-Hsing Liao’s subjects when he moved to the U.S. from Taiwan in 1999 at the age of 22.

It was the city’s ever-changing landscape that fascinated the young photographer. “Every other week, you go to the same spot and something’s different,” Liao tells Newsweek. “New York is one of the most diverse cities—there are so many different cultures that blend into New York.”

To capture that culture, he photographed the same spot over the course of a day and combined the images.

See more of Liao’s images at Newsweek.com

During the middle of our breakfast one early morning in January, the flaxen-haired actor Gillian Anderson abruptly asks me if I recall the coffee shop scene from Pulp Fiction. You know, the one where Honey Bunny and Pumpkin plot how they’re going to rob the joint? “I don’t know why. It’s a mixture of the music and some aspects of our conversation, but this feels like a parallel universe,” she says, except ours is inside the Trump SoHo New York hotel. “Like, what if all of a sudden those two people”—she points to a couple plunging into pancakes at a nearby table—“have alien beings inside them and something is going to crawl out of their skulls?” 

Newsweek, February 2015

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The war is over; now comes the reconstruction.

Slowly—actually very slowly and unsurely to boot—Gaza is starting the task of rebuilding its devastated homes and stores and schools after the summer war with Israel. But as winter approaches, and despite billions of dollars in donations and a great deal of international good will, unresolved political and regional issues are dimming any hope that there will be a quick return to normal life in the Strip.

See more picture and get the story at Newsweek.com

It’s provocative because it quite powerfully and accurately depicts the disgusting behavior and attitudes toward women that dozens of women in tech described to me and that tens of thousands more must navigate on a daily basis, to the detriment of their professional advancement. …

It is unfortunate, shallow, and frankly, petty, that magazine cover critics seem more upset about an image than the actual behavior that permeates Silicon Valley culture.

'X-Files' Behind Her, Gillian Anderson Is a Believer

BY PAULA MEJIA 2/14/15 AT 7:59 PM

During the middle of our breakfast one early morning in January, the flaxen-haired actor Gillian Anderson abruptly asks me if I recall the coffee shop scene from Pulp Fiction. You know, the one where Honey Bunny and Pumpkin plot how they’re going to rob the joint? “I don’t know why. It’s a mixture of the music and some aspects of our conversation, but this feels like a parallel universe,” she says, except ours is inside the Trump SoHo New York hotel. “Like, what if all of a sudden those two people”—she points to a couple plunging into pancakes at a nearby table—“have alien beings inside them and something is going to crawl out of their skulls?”

The Koi Restaurant at the Trump SoHo doesn’t bear much resemblance to the greasy spoon in Quentin Tarantino’s cult classic, but there has been something slightly supernatural about our conversation this morning, which has included discussions about lucid dreams, Charles Dickens, Tibetan monks and sociopathic behavior. Anderson’s alien-inhabitation scenario also could have been taken from an episode of The X-Files, the revered ’90s science fiction series that propelled her into international stardom in her role as the skeptical, brilliant FBI Agent Dana Scully.

But having spent the morning with Anderson, I suspect this kind of reference is not out of character. Clad in a brown silk shirt and a teardrop turquoise necklace, Anderson seems more believer (or at least agnostic) than skeptic, perhaps due to the many “extraordinary experiences” she tells me she’s had; when I press her about said experiences, she just smiles and leaves the details a mystery.

Keep reading

Newsweek becomes the latest victim of an Islamic State Twitter hacking 

At around 10:45 a.m. Eastern Time, the magazine’s Twitter account was briefly compromised by as-yet unidentified hackers claiming to be the “CyberCaliphate” and posted threatening messages aimed at first lady Michelle Obama and tweeted out pictures of supposedly confidential government documents.

Personal threat they made against the Obama family