new-media

I’m not sure the millennial generation has the patience to watch twelve, thirteen episodes of an hour-long show—even a half-hour show.
— 

Ynon Kreiz, the president of Maker Studios (The New Yorker)

I am really incredibly sorry for the dumb shit adults say, kids.

3

En Plein Vol

Collection of installations by Blizzard Concepts utilizes hair-dryers in creative ways, from dancing string to guiding a paper aeroplance:

This new project combines magic and visual arts;  burlesque / Unusual and light poetry.  Endless loops, random paths, levitation, etc;  we come face to actions over which we have no control but which by themselves, reaching the goal.  And impracticable, the improbable certain parts gently pushes us towards reverie.

Link

Why I'm honored to be ID'ed as a YouTuber by my friends:
  • Facebook friend posts:The President should fire whoever came up with the bright idea of interviews by "YouTube Stars."
  • Facebook friend comments on his post:If you were going to invite folks from YouTube, invite Peter Musser-he is trying to pull potential from YouTube instead of offering makeup tips or eating cereal from a bathtub!
  • Me:Actually I'm very much pleased with the YouTube Interviews.
  • 1) If you listen to all of the questions that the folks asked, they were all both solid and topical.
  • 2) The first person who sat down with him -- Hank Green -- is, hands down, one of the smartest people alive currently. In the span of three DAYS(!), he and his brother John Green got the YouTube community to raise $1.2 MILLION to donate to charities. He runs an online education *empire* whose guiding principle is, "let's make free, high-quality content for everyone ever, and if people see value in it, they'll pay us" -- and THEY DID. Let that sink in for a second. And the questions Hank asked didn't really pull any punches, as one could see by how the president visibly squirmed during a couple of them. He asked about the ethics of drones (without being on the attack about it), how there are even sanctions left to place on North Korea, and how the country's justice system is pretty dang broken when it came to incarceration, and how the federal government is going to react to the legalization at the state level of marijuana.
  • 3) GloZell Green, the second person to interview him, asked about race relations in the US since they relate to her husband and her family (which is made up of police officers and military members) . She also asked about the recent thawing of relations between the US and Cuba; that is, if the Castros are such dicks and so many people have been fleeing Cuba over the past 40 years, why are we thawing relations now? Is this not an important question to ask for people who literally haven't been alive long enough to know a world of any other kind?
  • 4) Bethany Mota, the last person he talked to, asked about how to rebuild confidence in the government when young people look at a government that is largely run by old white rich people people, and (I think it was her) also asked something along the lines of, "isn't there a HUGE conflict of interest in having people who come from huge companies and have pretty big conflicts of interest, turn around and 'retire' into really cushy government positions, or vice versa? Isn't that a conflict of interest?" Which is a really damned good question -- especially since she's ... wait for it... 19.
  • And also, between the three of them, they have right around 15 million subscribers just on their main channels. Every single one of them successfully runs what we might as well consider their own business. They each come from wildly different backgrounds. I can't think of three people I'd rather have representing me and my ilk.
  • However, I'm equal parts disappointed and unsurprised at how the traditional media outlets covered it. Here's a thing:Folks under the age of 30 have a very strong distaste for a) current news outlets and b) politics. Mainly because both are shitty. Mainly for the reason that (I'm willing to bet a dollar) current news outlets didn't tell you the majority of all that stuff I just wrote. They are afraid -- as afraid as emotionless corporations can be, anyhow -- at how quickly and with how much drive YouTube is pulling viewers away from them. So, they'll sell the idea that YouTube and online video isn't something to be taken seriously. They're wrong, of course -- hence online video being a multibillion dollar industry with multiple conventions around the world that draw tens of thousands of people.
  • Anything ANYONE can do to get that particular demographic more engaged should be welcomed, hands-down.
  • FB Friend:Hahaha-no. Good points all-but what the media DID take away were the silly items (green lipstick). My beef is that outside of Hank Green, I think that there were better suited prospects (like you!). I am reminded of authors doing vanity interviews of authors during the 80s and 90s.
  • Me:But... YouTube isn't made up of just Hank Greens and Peter Mussers. It's made up of Hanks, Peters, GloZells, Bethanys, Dres, Lindseys, Heathers, etc... And that's the WHOLE point.
  • We are solidly *not* journalists. We are people. And being able to tap into the doubts and feelz of an amazing diversity of 15 million of us by just talking to three is something that is, by any measure, an amazing thing.
  • FB Friend:My YouTube channel would be more inane than GloZell's, and less useful than Mota's...I'm just cranky about this as I am sure that besides Green, there were better candidates out there. The questions came off as ghost-written. Not sure what was intended here, but it came off as pandering. Just my opinion is all, Peter. I think that there is untapped potential in YouTube et al.
  • Me:I know, and I'm not faulting you for it. And FYI, they WERE ghost-written, in a way. Each person put it out to their fans to solicit feedback a week ago. That's the beauty of it -- it's basically a representative democracy where the elected officials actually reach out to their constituents for input and then do something with it. I would've done the same thing (although I only have 1k subscribers between both of my channels).
  • FB Friend:Ah-that makes sense.
  • ---
  • I feel so incredibly privileged (and delighted) that 1) people see "YouTuber" as solidly part of my identity that they bring me up in conversations when talking about it, and 2) that I was able to have this dialogue at all. What a gift we have been given, to help be ambassadors for this new medium. AH WHAT A TIME TO BE ALIVE
RE: tidal

On some real shit though, people don’t know how hard it is to have a successful streaming music business. 

I worked in that industry for 6-7 years. I’ve sat in countless meetings, and eavesdropped on countless conversations involving the CEO and head of product (lol). 

People just don’t want to pay for music, period. 

Did you know that Spotify is not a profitable business? They’re still losing money. 

Spotify is crushing the competition. They dwarf all of their competitors in brand awareness and paying subscribers. And they still aren’t turning a profit. 

here’s the point of my post though… Spotify isn’t turning a profit and they launched in 2008, so how can Tidal be a “flop” after 3 months?

This is a long game. A long hustle. And it involves re-conditioning the public to believe that music is something worth paying for. That takes years. Its not something that can be achieved in a few months. 

Full Disclosure: I was talking shit about Tidal last night but that was strictly for the lulz

Real celebrities must be so pissed cause YouTubers are winning over their audiences by the hordes, all with minimum wage production budgets. Like yeah that waitress with basic good looks….people like her more than they like you now, because personalities are actually becoming a factor. I love new media!

GOVERNMENT SET UP A FAKE FACEBOOK PAGE IN THIS WOMAN’S NAME»

The Justice Department is claiming, in a little-noticed court filing, that a federal agent had the right to impersonate a young woman online by creating a Facebook page in her name without her knowledge. Government lawyers also are defending the agent’s right to scour the woman’s seized cell phone and to post photographs — including racy pictures of her and even one of her young son and niece — to the phony social media account, which the agent was using to communicate with suspected criminals.

The woman, Sondra Arquiett, who then went by the name Sondra Prince, first learned her identity had been commandeered in 2010 when a friend asked about the pictures she was posting on her Facebook page. There she was, for anyone with an account to see — posing on the hood of a BMW, legs spread, or, in another, wearing only skimpy attire. She was surprised; she hadn’t even set up a Facebook page.

The account was actually set up by U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration Special Agent Timothy Sinnigen.

(Source: Schneier on Security)