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20 different types of rain, from drizzle to downpour, are captured in a series of bottles for an installation by design studio Nendo (via).

Created for the 2014 Fall edition of Maison & Objet in Paris, who asked designers to consider the relationship between language and design, the word rain was chosen for its many nuances in Japanese, a language that has dozens of words for rain depending on the condition and time of day.

The exhibit consists of 20 clear acrylic bottles lined-up, each containing a different kind of ‘rain’. ‘Kirisame’, ‘biu' and 'kosame' refer to different degrees of fine drizzle, while 'niwaka-ame' is a sudden downpour. 'Mizore' is sleet, and a 'yudachi' falls in the evening. 'Kisame' is rain that drips from the ends of tree branches, and 'kaiu' is rain that falls mixed with dust and pollen. Seasonal rains were also included, from the 'samidare' that falls in the spring, to 'shigure’, rain specific to autumn and winter.

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Chocolates like a set of oil Paints Tubes by Nendo

Photo © Ayao Yamazaki.

Almost six years have passed since Nendo’s “sweet” collaboration with patissier Tsujiguchi Hironobu which dazzled us with ingeniously conceived Chocolate-pencils, not to mention the unique pencil sharpener used to grate chocolate shavings onto Tsujiguchi’s desserts. Following on from these delectable creations, Japanese based studio Nendo recently designed a limited quantity of chocolate-paints for the Seibu Department Store in Japan.

 

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Nendo exhibits rain bottle installation at Maison et Objet 2014

each vessel contains a variation of rain


all images by hiroshi iwasaki

the trend exhibition presented at the 2014 fall edition of maison et objet has invited international creatives to work under the theme ‘words’, considering the relationship between language and design. for his participation, nendo selected ‘rain’, considering the term’s numerous nuances in japanese — which has a slew of references for the atmospheric condition, reflecting the sensibilities of the language

 the scenography of the presentation is a line-up of clear acrylic bottles which each contain variations of rain: ‘kirisame’, ‘biu’ and ‘kosame’ refer to different degrees of fine drizzle; ‘niwaka-ame’ is a sudden downpour’; ‘mizore’ is sleet; ‘yudachi’ are showers that occur the evening; ‘kisame’ is precipitation that drips from the end of tree branches; and ‘kaiu’ is deluge that is mixed with dust and pollen.

among these, are seasonally specific rainfalls — from ‘samidare’ that happens in the spring, to ‘shigure’, which refers to those that are typical to autumn and winter. through ‘rain bottle’ nendo wishes to express japan’s relationship to nature, and the depth of this connection.

’Kirisame’, ‘biu’ and ‘kosame’ refer to different degrees of fine drizzle, while ‘niwaka-ame’ is a
sudden downpour. ‘Mizore’ is sleet, and a ‘yudachi’ falls in the evening. ‘Kisame’ is rain that drips from the
ends of tree branches, and ‘kaiu’ is rain that falls mixed with dust and pollen. 

We also included seasonal rains, from the ‘samidare’ that falls in the spring, to ‘shigure’, rain specific to autumn and winter.

The installation will incluude twenty different kinds of ‘rain’, representing the unique relationship between Japanese culture
and nature.

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Edible Chocolate Art Supplies by Nendo

If you ever had an overwhelming desire to eat paste or paint chips as a child, this might be for you. Created by design firm Nendo (previously) for the Seibu Department Store in Japan these 12-piece paint sets are completely edible, paint tubes and all. Instead of paint, each tube contains a different flavored caramel or syrup matching the color of its label from green tea to strawberry to honey. Nendo previously designed a set of edible chocolate pencils back in 2007.

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Nendo - Rassen for Hashikura Matsukan by | n meister
Photos by Akihiro Yoshida

For four centuries, the town of Obama in Fukui Prefecture, Japan, has manufactured lacquered chopsticks. Obama’s lacquered chopsticks have been recognised as the hardest and most beautiful of Japanese lacquer chopsticks since the seventeenth century, when they became known as ‘Wakasa-nuri’. We designed new chopsticks in collaboration with Hashikura Matsukan, a manufacturer who continue Obama’s traditional manufacturing techniques today. Chopsticks ordinarily come in pairs, but the rassen chopsticks are a single unit. They’re separated into two for eating, then rejoined into one form when not in use. We used the artisans’ hand skills and a multi-axis CNC miller to create these unusual chopsticks.

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