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Meena Kandasamy, on the panel discussion Gender and the Hindu Right in India, LSE (3 March 2014)

The Gender Institute in collaboration with the Freedom Without Fear Platform and South Asia Solidarity Group; a panel discussion on Gender and the Hindu Right in India; London School of Economics and Political Science.

Meena Kandasamy is a Dalit feminist activist and political columnist and author. In this panel, she speaks about what happens when women challenge right-wing Hindu political forces and the caste hierarchies which they support. She will also examines the Hindu Right’s notion of the ideal woman which fuels a culture of victim-blaming and moral policing. She discusses politics in Kerala and Tamil Nadu, and massacres and mass systematic violence carried out against Dalits in those states and all across India. 

… the court also used the word “Indian culture”, when it wanted to frame this talk about what rights parents have and what rights parents don’t have. And I think this “Indian culture” is again something that is most vexing because one [thing] is, we don’t have any homogenous idea of Indian culture — Hindutva has made it the shorthand, by invoking the word “Indian culture” to basically invoke everything that can run against any feminist interest. So, “Indian culture” becomes the word that tells you how dress, “Indian culture” becomes the word that tells you when you should be back home, “Indian culture” is the word that tells you who you should date, when you should date, when you should have children, whether you should have children at all.  

[…]

Even though “Indian culture” might have been the brainchild of Hindutva, it really appeals to the conservative elements all across society; it appeals to feudal elements all across society; it appeals to the moral police everywhere. Even if they might not patently identify themselves with Hindutva, this is the kind of effect it has on society.

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Meena Kandasamy, on the panel discussion Gender and the Hindu Right in India, LSE, 3 March 2014 (link to full video)

The Gender Institute in collaboration with the Freedom Without Fear Platform and South Asia Solidarity Group; a panel discussion on Gender and the Hindu Right in India; London School of Economics and Political Science.

Meena Kandasamy is a Dalit feminist activist and political columnist and author. In this panel, she speaks about what happens when women challenge right-wing Hindu political forces and the caste hierarchies which they support. She will also examines the Hindu Right’s notion of the ideal woman which fuels a culture of victim-blaming and moral policing.

     ”Blue makeup and a fierce stare are a young girl’s preparations for the Angalamman festival, held every year in the village of Kaveripattinam in Tamil Nadu, India. The festival celebrates Angalamman, a guardian deity.”

  

     Photograph by Mahesh Balasubramanian

  

     Content source: Angalamman Festival, India - National Geographic Travel Daily Photo

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Ceremonial Bichwa Dagger

  • Dated: 17th century
  • Geography: Thanjavur, Tamil Nadu
  • Culture: Indian, Thanjavur
  • Medium: steel, gold
  • Dimensions: overall length 8⅛ inches (20.6 cm)

This intricately crafted dagger is among the best examples of ornamental steel chiseling from southeastern India, an area renowned for that art in the past. It may belong to a group of ornately decorated weapons that was preserved in the palace armory of Tanjore (present-day Thanjavur, Tamil Nadu) until the 1850s. The dagger is particularly noteworthy for the fineness of its workmanship, including complete figures in the round, and for retaining areas of original gilding, which is entirely missing on most surviving pieces of this type.

Source: Copyright © 2015 The Metropolitan Museum of Art

I still remember explaining to my friend back in grade school that “no, my dad isn’t wearing a skirt.” 

It’s actually a really masculine type of clothing and can convey a whole lot of meaning from respect to arrogance. It just depends on how you wear it.

This picture became so viral during the opening of LuLu Mall. I love it. They look so fashionable. 

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SO

http://nadunadu.tumblr.com

Drew the LOVELY pic I requested BD 

And I drew Bunny’s response, but the only problem is I couldnt reblog the original pic with image reactions cause the stupid thing wouldnt let me B/

SO I made a screencap and thus put it in sequence. You can find Nadu Nadu’s original pic here: 

http://nadunadu.tumblr.com/post/45180861067/jack-and-hiccup-borrow-north-and-stoiks

But yeah, funny things 

Thrift shop Bunny 8I

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photos for the laia foundation by pep avila in vedanthanga, a village in the indian state of tamil nadu, where most residents are dalits, or those who are traditionally regarded in the caste system as untouchables. 

though ‘untouchability’ is barred in india’s constitution, dalits (which translates as broken or crushed) remain an ostracized community in vedanthanga, prevented from owning land and forced to work jobs other castes see as beneath them. 

the laia foundation, founded after the 2004 tsunami, works with the dalits of vedanthanga, contributing to their social and economic development through educational, health and women’s empowerment projects.