Prompt: The magical, the mythical, and the legendary.


Myth: ex: If you eat pop rocks and drink a soda, your stomach will burst.

Now, write your own!

The sky is blue because….?

Legend: ex: A werewolf is created when he or she has been bitten by another werewolf.

Write your own!

Legend has it that if you drink from the forest stream under a blood moon, you will become a creature that is called a _____________?


Get creative!

The recent release of Susan Greenfield’s new book and the film Lucy, both of which are dependent on tired misconceptions or dubious theories about the brain, suggest one worrying conclusion: we are running out of myths about the brain. So here are some new ones, to keep things ‘mysterious’
-
One of the best things about being a neuroscientist used to be the aura of mystery around it. It was once so mysterious that some people didn’t even know it was a thing. When I first went to university and people asked what I studied, they thought I was saying I was a “Euroscientist”, which is presumably someone who studies the science of Europe. I’d get weird questions such as “what do you think of Belgium?” and I’d have to admit that, in all honesty, I never think of Belgium. That’s how mysterious neuroscience was, once. Of course, you could say this confusion was due to my dense Welsh accent, or the fact that I only had the confidence to talk to strangers after consuming a fair amount of alcohol, but I prefer to go with the mystery. It’s not like that any more. Neuroscience is “mainstream” now, to the point where the press coverage of it can be studied extensively. When there’s such a thing as Neuromarketing (well, there isn’t actually such a thing, but there’s a whole industry that would claim otherwise), it’s impossible to maintain that neuroscience is “cool” or “edgy”. It’s a bad time for us neurohipsters (which are the same as regular hipsters, except the designer beards are on the frontal lobes rather than the jaw-line). One way that we professional neuroscientists could maintain our superiority was by correcting misconceptions about the brain, but lately even that avenue looks to be closing to us. The recent film Lucy is based on the most classic brain misconception: that we only use 10% of our brain. But it’s had a considerable amount of flack for this already, suggesting that many people are wise to this myth. We also saw the recent release of Susan Greenfield’s new book Mind Change, all about how technology is changing (damaging?) our brains. This is a worryingly evidence-free but very common claim by Greenfield. Depressingly common, as this blog has pointed out many times. But now even the non-neuroscientist reviewers aren’t buying her claims.

icarus never dreamt of flying
persephone didn’t ask for a crown
daphne hardly wanted the love of a god

the myths are varied, true and false,
full of gods and monsters, fate and luck
but they are stories of more than magic
more than immortality and divinity

they are stories of people like you and me
people who didn’t pray for heroism
or for a throne high above on olympus

myths are stories of humans
who loved and lost like us
who fell from great heights
to even greater depths

the gods would never dare to tell
the secret of their myths:

but the truth is, the highest
form of divinity
is humanity.

—  all hercules wanted was family [x]
10


For more posts like these, go visit psych2go

Psych2go features various psychological findings and myths. In the future, psych2go attempts to include sources to posts for the for the purpose of generating discussions and commentaries. This will give readers a chance to critically examine psychology.

Everything you know about Ebola is wrong

There’s a lot of misinformation out there. Here’s the scoop on a few of the myths circulating about this viral disease. 

1. Ebola has killed a lot of people.

Ebola has a high fatality rate, killing many people who are infected with the virus, but there still haven’t been very many deaths from Ebola overall. It’s caused approximately 4000 infections and 2400 deaths since the first outbreak was recorded in 1976. That’s an average of 64 people per year over 38 years. In contrast, malaria kills more than 600,000 people every year, or about 68 people per hour. Ebola is exotic, frightening and headline-worthy when the virus surfaces in humans, but it’s not even a blip on the list of the world’s most important killers. If you want to worry about a cause of death, look to car accidents, influenza or even lightning strikes — all are bigger worldwide killers than Ebola.

Where it comes from, when it’s been in the U.S. and more

If nothing else, no religion can stand in the way of fun power tools.

5 Myths You Probably Believe About Major Religions

#5. The Amish Do Not Use Technology

The Amish Ordnung stresses the concepts of modesty, necessity, productivity, and especially community. Nothing in there says anything about shunning the Internet. It’s just that the idea of sitting alone in the dark while reading dick jokes off a $2,000 glowing rectangle is pretty much their idea of hell. They’re completely cool with modern gadgetry when its use is necessary and doesn’t cause adverse effects to the community. And contrary to what you might have heard, they have nothing against electricity. They just think the public grid is bullshit, so they use home generators, solar power, and batteries instead.

Read More

10

For more posts like these, go visit psych2go

Psych2go features various psychological findings and myths. In the future, psych2go attempts to include sources to posts for the for the purpose of generating discussions and commentaries. This will give readers a chance to critically examine psychology.

Myth 1: Dogs may attack without warning. For example, Pedro the German shepherd police dog from Texas made infamous from the YouTube video “Untamed and Uncut,” (see below) shockingly attacked a news reporter seconds after “doing great” and calmly sitting.

Fact: Pedro displayed biological signs that he was not doing great. It was not shocking that he became aggressive. His ears were set back; he tried to increase the distance between him and the news reporter, evidenced by his pulling his head away from the man; his lips were drawn back and tense; he licked the air several times. There will be visible warning before a dog attacks.

There are some dogs, Siracusa says, with poor communicative skills or which are highly impulsive, but even those dogs will show subtle warning signs ( for example, stiffness and a “tense” face).

Myth 2: When a dog rolls onto its back, it wants to be petted.

Fact: If the dog rolls over and shows his belly, with his head to the side and his paws stiff in the air, it may mean the dog is uneasy and tense. This especially can happen when meeting a stranger.

People should assume that a dog does not want to be petted unless it is clearly showing he is relaxed and wagging his tail.

Myth 3: Tail wagging is always a friendly sign.

Fact: Tail wagging means that the dog is interacting with someone — that person is on his radar — but does not tell much about the value of the interaction.

Look at the dog’s ears and lips first. If the tail is wagging but the ears are drawn back, the dog is feeling stressed.

Myth 4: Training your dog will make you the Alpha.

Fact: A dog is not a domesticated wolf and dogs do not form packs. There is no Alpha situation. Dogs rely on their owners. It’s a matter of attachment, not dominance.

Myth 5: Punishment will train the dog to obey and behave.

Fact: Punishment can increase anxiety and anxiety interferes with learning. Instead, seek expert advice on behavior modification and training.

Myth 6: Absence of behavior means the dog is OK.

Fact: A dog who barely reacts to its owner may have learned helplessness and experienced punishment to the point of being nonresponsive. Absence of behavior is not a healthy goal for a pet owner to have.

10

For more posts like these, go visit psych2go

Psych2go features various psychological findings and myths. In the future, psych2go attempts to include sources to posts for the for the purpose of generating discussions and commentaries. This will give readers a chance to critically examine psychology.

3
Hermes

(Greek: Ἑρμῆς) is an Olympian god in Greek religion and mythology, son of Zeus and the Pleiad Maia. He is second youngest of the Olympian gods. Hermes is a god of transitions and boundaries. He is quick and cunning, and moved freely between the worlds of the mortal and divine, as emissary and messenger of the gods, intercessor between mortals and the divine, and conductor of souls into the afterlife. He is protector and patron of travelers, herdsmen, thieves, orators and wit, literature and poets, athletics and sports, invention and trade. In some myths he is a trickster, and outwits other gods for his own satisfaction or the sake of humankind. His attributes and symbols include the herma, the rooster and the tortoise, purse or pouch, winged sandals, winged cap, and his main symbol is the herald’s staff, the Greek kerykeion or Latin caduceus which consisted of two snakes wrapped around a winged staff. Source | Edit | More about Greek Mythology. 

Text
Photo
Quote
Link
Chat
Audio
Video