Greek mythology meme: [1/6] titans

Selene

Selene was the titan goddess and the divine personification of the Moon. She was a daughter of Hyperion, the titan of light, and the sister of Eos and Helios, correspondingly the titans of dawn and the Sun. Selene’s dearest lover was Endymion, who was granted eternal youth and immortality on the condition of spending his life asleep. Selene visited him every night and the couple had many children, the most notable of whom were the Menai, the goddesses of the lunar months.

FEAR FOR YOUR BEARD

TWO BROTHERS, NYNIAW AND PEIBIAW, ARE BEING SHIT-DICKS TO EACH OTHER. INITIALLY THEY’RE  ARGUING ABOUT WHO HAS MORE SHEEP AND WHERE TO GRAZE THEM (IT’S WALES, SHEEP ARE SERIOUS BUSINESS), BUT THIS ESCALATES QUICKLY AND THEY START BEATING THE SHIT OUT OF EACH OTHER.

THIS WOULD BE FINE, BUT THESE BROTHERS BOTH HAD MASSIVE ARMIES AND SOON THERE’S A WHOLE FUCKING WAR. SHEEP ARE CLEARLY WORTH IT.

UP IN NORTH-WALES THE GIANT KING RHUDDA GAWR HEARS ABOUT THESE IDIOTS AND THEIR WAR AND THINKS THEY’RE BOTH FUCKING IDIOTS. HE TAKES THE OPPORTUNITY TO ANNIHILATE BOTH SIDES, BECAUSE HE HAS A MASSIVE ARMY AND HE WANTS TO ADD TO HIS BEARD COLLECTION.

RHUDDA HAD A MASSIVE FUCKING CAPE MADE OF THE BEARDS OF HIS ENEMIES. YES, WE WANT ONE TOO.

BY NOW, ALL THE OTHER NEARBY KINGS ARE TERRIFIED FOR THEIR BEARDS SO ONLY SOLUTION IS TO KILL RHUDDA AND SAVE THEIR SEXY SEXY FACIAL HAIR. BUT THEY’RE FUCKING USELESS AND RHUDDA ADDED TO HIS BEARD CAPE AND NUMBER OF SHEEP. 

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EAST ASIAN MYTHOLOGY MEME:

[5/9] CHINESE GODS AND GODDESSES | NÜWA

Nüwa [女媧] is a goddess in ancient Chinese mythology best known for creating mankind and repairing the wall of heaven. 

Nüwa is not considered a creator of the entire physical universe, but a creator and protector of animals and people. It is said that Nüwa existed in the beginning of the world. The earth was a beautiful place with blossoming trees and flowers, and full of animals, birds, fish and all living creatures. But as she wandered about it, Nüwa felt very lonely, so she began to create animals.

On the seventh day of creation, she bent down and took up a handful of yellow clay, mixed it with water and molded a figure in her likeness. As she worked, the figure came alive — the first human being.

Nüwa was pleased with her creation and went on making more figures of both men and women. They danced around her, and her loneliness was dispelled. She created hundreds of figures, but grew tired of the laborious process. Then she dipped a rope in the clay mud, and swung it around her. Soon the earth around her was covered with lumps of mud. The handmade figurines became the wealthy and the noble; those that arose from the splashes of mud were the poor and the common.

Hades abducting Persephone, wall painting in the small royal tomb at Vergina. Macedonia, Greece.

In Greek mythology, Persephone is the Queen of the Underwold and the goddess of spring growth.
She is the daughter of Zeus, the king of the gods, and Demeter, the goddess of the harvest and agriculture.

The abduction of Persephone has been interpreted countless times, which has resulted in it being cloaked by confusion and obscurity.
The oldest source is probably the Homeric Hymn to Demeter, and here’s part of it:

"Apart from Demeter, lady of the golden sword and glorious fruits, she was playing with the deep-bosomed daughters of Oceanus and gathering flowers over a soft meadow, roses and crocuses and beautiful violets, irises also and hyacinths and the narcissus, which Earth made to grow at the will of Zeus and to please the Host of Many, to be a snare for the bloom-like girl — a marvellous, radiant flower. It was a thing of awe whether for deathless gods or mortal men to see: from its root grew a hundred blooms and is smelled most sweetly, so that all wide heaven above and the whole earth and the sea’s salt swell laughed for joy. And the girl was amazed and reached out with both hands to take the lovely toy; but the wide-pathed earth yawned there in the plain of Nysa, and the lord, Host of Many, with his immortal horses sprang out upon her — the Son of Cronos, He who has many names." (4-18)

According to this same hymn, Hekate (the goddess of crossroads) and Helios (the god of the sun) were the only ones who heard Persephone’s cries for her father, Zeus.
Demeter searched for her daughter for nine days straight, and on the tenth day Hekate came to her, and told the goddess that she had indeed heard Persephone being taken away, but that she had not seen who the perpetrator was.
Then Demeter went to Helios, and asked him to tell her the truth about who took her daughter. Helios responded that Hades had taken her with permission from Zeus.

Grief and anger overcame Demeter, and, in the disguise of an old and barren woman, she wandered the towns of men for a long while until she came to the house of King Keleus of Eleusis, where the daughters of the lord found her. The daughters enquired of her presence, and the disguised goddess said she was, against her will, brought from Crete by pirates, and, having escaped them, she was now seeking whatever work they would give her.
Demeter was offered the job of taking care of King Keleus’ newly born son, Demophon. For a long time, the goddess did not as much as smile because of the desire to be reunited with her daughter, but the woman Iambe made her laugh through humor and quips.
At night, Demeter would lay the baby boy, Demophon, into the hearth’s flames - burning the mortality from him, and slowly transforming him into an immortal being. She did this every night until Metaneira, the boy’s mother, saw it and was enraged.
The goddess then spoke:

"Witless are you mortals and dull to foresee your lot, whether of good or evil, that comes upon you. For now in your heedlessness you have wrought folly past healing; for — be witness the oath of the gods, the relentless water of Styx — I would have made your dear son deathless and unaging all his days and would have bestowed on him everlasting honour, but now he can in no way escape death and the fates." (254-258)

She then proceeded to cast away her disguise, showing her true divine nature, and demanded that, for the people of Eleusis to win back her favor, they build her a great temple. The Lord Keleus, upon hearing this, built the sanctuary of Demeter and Persephone at Eleusis, and followers of the Eleusinian Mysteries came there to celebrate them for a little over two millennia.

After the temple was built, Demeter still longed for the return of Persephone. This grief caused a year of famine for mankind. All land was lifeless, and Zeus, the king of the gods, therefore sent Iris to implore the goddess to return to Olympos.
However, Demeter said she would not return until Persephone, her daughter, was released from the Underworld. Upon hearing this, Zeus sent Hermes down to the Underworld to make Hades release his bride, and Hermes did. Hades, having been commanded to let Persephone go, said:

"Go now, Persephone, to your dark-robed mother, go, and feel kindly in your heart towards me: be not so exceedingly cast down; for I shall be no unfitting husband for you among the deathless gods, that am own brother to father Zeus. And while you are here, you shall rule all that lives and moves and shall have the greatest rights among the deathless gods: those who defraud you and do not appease your power with offerings, reverently performing rites and paying fit gifts, shall be punished for evermore." (358-364)

Even though Hades had to release his wife, he gave the young goddess a pomegranate seed to eat, so that she would always be tied to the Underworld.

Persephone was reunited with her mother, but only for two thirds of the year; one third of the year she had to spend as Queen of the Underworld and the wife of Hades, because of the pomegranate seed she ate.

Kallikantzaros

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They are malevolent goblins in Southeastern European (Greek, Bulgarian, Serbian) and Anatolian folklore (Turkey). They dwell underground but come to the surface during the twelve days of Christmas, from 25th December to 6th January (from the winter solstice for a fortnight during which time the sun ceases its seasonal movement).

It is believed that Kallikantzaroi stay underground sawing the World tree, so that it will collapse, along with Earth. However, when they are about to saw the final part, Christmas dawns and they are able to come to the surface. They forget the Tree and come to bring trouble to mortals.

Finally, on the Epiphany (6th January), the sun starts moving again, and they must go underground again to continue their sawing. They see that during their absence the World tree has healed itself, so they must start working all over again. This happens every year.

Appearance

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There is no standard appearance of Kallikantzaroi, there are regional differences on their appearance.

The Greeks describe them as:

  • Hairy bodies.
  • Horse legs.
  • Boar tusks (sometimes).
  • Tall.
  • Black.
  • Burning red eyes.
  • Goat’s or donkey’s ears.
  • Monkey’s arms.
  • Tongues that hang.
  • Huge heads.

Others see them as humans of small size smelling horribly, that are predominately male. However, different regions both have the similar description of them resembling a little, black devil.

They are, also, mostly blind, speak with a lisp and love to eat frogs, worms, and other small creatures.

Lore

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The Kallikantzaroi are said to be the creatures of the night. There were many ways people could protect themselves during the days when the Kallikantzaroi were loose. They could leave a colander on their doorstep to trick the visiting Kallikantzaros. Since they could not count above 2 (3 is a holy number and by pronouncing it he would kill himself) the Kalikantzaros would sit at the doorstep counting, 1, 2… 1, 2… each hole of the colander, all night, until the sun rose and he were forced to hide.

Another method of protection was to leave the fire burning in the fireplace, all night, so that they cannot enter through there. In some areas, they would burn the Yule log, a large piece of wood, for the duration of the twelve days. And in other areas, people would throw smelly shoes in the fire, the stink repulsing the Kallikantzaroi and forcing them to stay away. Yet other ways to keep them away were to mark the door with a black cross on Christmas Eve and burn incense.

Legend has it that any child born during the twelve days of Christmas was in danger of transforming to a Kallikantzaros for each Christmas season, starting with adulthood. The antidote: Binding the baby in tresses of garlic or straw, or singeing the child’s toenails. In another legend, anyone born on a Saturday can see and talk with the Kallikantzaroi.

(According to a source) on the eve of Epiphany in Cyprus, villagers scatter pancakes on the roof to give the Kallikantzaroi something sweet to eat as they prepare to head out of town.

In Serbian Folklore

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In Serbian Christmas traditions, the Twelve Days of Christmas used to be called the “unbaptised days” and were considered a time when demonic forces of all kinds were believed to be more than usually active and dangerous. People were cautious not to attract their attention, and did not go out late at night. The latter precaution was especially because of the demons called karakondžula, imagined as heavy, squat, and ugly creatures.

According to tradition, when a karakondžula found someone outdoors during the night of an unbaptised day, it would jump on the person’s back and demand to be carried wherever it wanted. This torture would end only when roosters announced the dawn; at that moment the creature would release its victim and run away.

In Anatolian Folklore

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The karankoncolos is a malevolent creature in Northeast Anatolian Turkish folklore. According to late Ottoman Turkish myth, they appear on the first ten days of Zemheri, “the dreadful cold”, when they stand on murky corners, and ask seemingly ordinary questions to the passers-by. In order to escape harm, one should answer each question, using the word kara" (the Turkish word for "black"), or risk being struck dead by the creature. It was also said in Turkish folklore that the karakoncolos could call people out during the cold Zemheri nights, by imitating voices of loved ones. The karakoncolos’ victim risked freezing to death if he or she could not awake from the charm. 

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Witch Series : The Supreme Witch.

The Supreme Witch, known more colloquially as The Supreme, is a worldwide recognized status among the witches descending from the Salem witch trials. While most witches possess only a handful of gifts, the Supreme is said to embody multiple, if not all, gifts. Historically, there is said to be only one Supreme per generation (approximately 30-50 years). Part of being a Supreme meant no ailments or diseases would harm the Supreme.

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favourite faces for favourite mythic ladies: Asterodeia with Esti Ginzburg

From the Kaukasos Mountains there flows a stream that bears bands and swirls of the purest gold. The men of this land know it well and have long learned to temper their greed, but strangers who see it always take too much. The bright shimmering surfaces leads down into darker depths, and through every part of this the nymph Asterodeia swims, almost as golden as the water itself. Daughter of the Phasis River, Asterodeia breathes water and gold and darts between the fishermen and their nets.

Only one thing ever draws her from her river for long enough that she considers not returning: King Aeetes of Colchis is beautiful, with eyes like the wine-dark sea, and when they kiss she wonders upon what it would be like to be a mortal queen who reigns far from her home. (It doesn’t last: Asterodeia, bright rosy-star, loves her river and her mountain more than any man, whether it be a firm-handed king or their newborn golden son.)

The struggle of a Classics student
  • Teacher:"So, now go write a 3 pages essay on the moral of Pyramus and Thisbe."
  • Everyone:"OMG 3 pages??! Are you kidding? That's way to much! I don't even know 1 sentence about that! I'm gonna pick the biggest font and put lots of images in it."
  • Me:"3 pages??! Are you kidding? How am I gonna put all my thoughts about that in just 3 pages?!"
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Witch Series : Telekinesis.

Psychokinesis (Greek ψυχή κίνησις, “mind movement”), or telekinesis (τῆλε κίνησις, “distance movement”), is an alleged psychic ability allowing a person to influence a physical system without physical interaction. Psychokinesis and telekinesis are sometimes abbreviated as PK and TK respectively. Examples of psychokinesis could include moving an object and levitation. There is no conclusive evidence that psychokinesis is a real phenomenon.

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