MATH MYTHS: (from Mind over Math)

1. MEN ARE BETTER IN MATH THAN WOMEN.
Research has failed to show any difference between men and women in mathematical ability. Men are reluctant to admit they have problems so they express difficulty with math by saying, “I could do it if I tried.” Women are often too ready to admit inadequacy and say, “I just can’t do math.”

2. MATH REQUIRES LOGIC, NOT INTUITION.
Few people are aware that intuition is the cornerstone of doing math and solving problems. Mathematicians always think intuitively first. Everyone has mathematical intuition; they just have not learned to use or trust it. It is amazing how often the first idea you come up with turns out to be correct.

3. MATH IS NOT CREATIVE.
Creativity is as central to mathematics as it is to art, literature, and music. The act of creation involves diametrical opposites—working intensely and relaxing, the frustration of failure and elation of discovery, satisfaction of seeing all the pieces fit together. It requires imagination, intellect, intuition, and aesthetic about the rightness of things.

4. YOU MUST ALWAYS KNOW HOW YOU GOT THE ANSWER.
Getting the answer to a problem and knowing how the answer was derived are independent processes. If you are consistently right, then you know how to do the problem. There is no need to explain it.

5. THERE IS A BEST WAY TO DO MATH PROBLEMS.
A math problem may be solved by a variety of methods which express individuality and originality-but there is no best way. New and interesting techniques for doing all levels of mathematics, from arithmetic to calculus, have been discovered by students. The way math is done is very individual and personal and the best method is the one which you feel most comfortable.

6. IT’S ALWAYS IMPORTANT TO GET THE ANSWER EXACTLY RIGHT.
The ability to obtain approximate answer is often more important than getting exact answers. Feeling about the importance of the answer often are a reversion to early school years when arithmetic was taught as a feeling that you were “good” when you got the right answer and “bad” when you did not.

7. IT’S BAD TO COUNT ON YOUR FINGERS.
There is nothing wrong with counting on fingers as an aid to doing arithmetic. Counting on fingers actually indicates an understanding of arithmetic-more understanding than if everything were memorized.

8. MATHEMATICIANS DO PROBLEMS QUICKLY, IN THEIR HEADS.
Solving new problems or learning new material is always difficult and time consuming. The only problems mathematicians do quickly are those they have solved before. Speed is not a measure of ability. It is the result of experience and practice.

9. MATH REQUIRES A GOOD MEMORY.
Knowing math means that concepts make sense to you and rules and formulas seem natural. This kind of knowledge cannot be gained through rote memorization.

10. MATH IS DONE BY WORKING INTENSELY UNTIL THE PROBLEM IS SOLVED. Solving problems requires both resting and working intensely. Going away from a problem and later returning to it allows your mind time to assimilate ideas and develop new ones. Often, upon coming back to a problem a new insight is experienced which unlocks the solution.

11. SOME PEOPLE HAVE A “MATH MIND” AND SOME DON’T.
Belief in myths about how math is done leads to a complete lack of self-confidence. But it is self-confidence that is one of the most important determining factors in mathematical performance. We have yet to encounter anyone who could not attain his or her goals once the emotional blocks were removed.

12. THERE IS A MAGIC KEY TO DOING MATH.
There is no formula, rule, or general guideline which will suddenly unlock the mysteries of math. If there is a key to doing math, it is in overcoming anxiety about the subject and in using the same skills you use to do everything else.


Source: “Mind Over Math,” McGraw-Hill Book Company, pp. 30-43.

Revised: Summer 1999 
Student Learning Assistance Center (SLAC)
Southwest Texas State University

Photo: http://math2033.uark.edu/wiki/index.php/MathBusters

It can get pretty confusing with all the different information out there about nutrition which is why the guys at Women’s Health  asked several nutritionists to set the record straight on some of the biggest healthy-eating myths around.

Myth: Frozen Fruits and Veggies Are Less Nutritious Than Fresh Ones

"Frozen fruits and vegetables are flash-frozen within hours of being picked, locking in a majority of the nutrients," says Joy Bauer, M.S., R.D., the nutrition and health expert for NBC’s TODAY Show and founder of NourishSnacks. She recommends taking advantage of fresh produce when you can—but keeping a stash of frozen produce on-hand for times when you’re in a rush or you can’t buy that item fresh because it’s not in-season.

Myth: You Need to Cleanse or Detox

"The body already does that for you," says Kristin Kirkpatrick, M.S., R.D., a wellness manager at the Cleveland Clinic Wellness Institute. "You don’t need a buy a juice or pill to accomplish that."

Myth: You Have to Count Calories to Lose Weight

"Consuming 100 calories’ worth of cupcakes, soda, or French fries is not the same as eating 100 calories of vegetables or brown rice," says Keri Glassman, R.D., a Women’s Healthcontributor. "I tell clients to stop getting caught up in the number of calories and instead focus on where you are getting them from." If you’re mindful and consume the vitamins and minerals your body needs, you’ll be able to drop pounds without becoming obsessive about calorie counting. AMEN TO THIS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Myth: One Type of Diet is Better Than Others

"The reality is we’re all individuals with unique needs, likes/dislikes, and intolerances," says Katie Cavuto, M.S., R.D., the dietician for the Phillies and the Flyers. "We have to take time to listen to our bodies’ needs to truly determine what works for each of us."

Myth: Eating Fat will Make You Fat

"According to abundant amounts of research, the opposite is true," says Kirkpatrick. Granted, what kind of fat you’re eating makes a big difference. "Opt for healthy fats that promote cardiovascular health—monounsaturated and essential fatty acids," suggests Glassman. Find out how much of each type of fat you should be consuming.

Myth: A Juice Cleanse is a Great Way to Jumpstart Your Metabolism

"While juicing is great because you’re getting a lot of vitamins and minerals, most commercial juices are void of protein," says Bauer. "You need protein to rev your metabolism and help steady blood sugar." If you really love to juice, only do it for one meal a day—and make sure to add a scoop of Greek yogurt or protein powder to your drink. And if you don’t love following a liquid diet, definitely don’t feel like you have to juice.

Myth: Eggs are bad for you

"I have so many clients come to me who are egg-phobic," says Brooke Alpert, M.S., R.D., founder of B Nutritious. In reality, eggs are packed with nutrients; there are six grams of protein and five grams of fat in each one. "The combination of fat and protein promotes satiety,” says Michelle Davenport, Ph.D., R.D., a Silicon Valley nutritionist. And definitely don’t discard the yolk. "It’s full of essential fatty acids like DHA (for healthy brains!) and arachidonic acid," says Davenport.

Myth: Eating After 6 p.m. Causes Weight Gain

"It doesn’t matter how late you eat, but rather what you eat," say Keri Gans, R.D., author of The Small Change Diet. “If you eat more calories than your body needs, you will gain weight—even if dinner was at 5 p.m. The problem is, most people who eat late at night are starved and wind up overeating.”

Myth: It’s Important to Eat Several Small Meals Each Day

Mitzi Dulan, R.D., author of The Pinterest Diet, recommends sticking with three meals per day and one snack. Why? “Eating five to six small meals can lead to unsatisfying meals,” she says. Also, when it feels like you never stop eating; it’s easy to take in too many calories.

Myth: Low- or No-Carb Diets Are Good for You

"Your brain needs carbs to function," says Glassman. Granted, your brain doesn’t need refined carbs like white bread, pasta, candy, and cookies. The best sources of healthy carbohydrates are whole grains, veggies, and fruits. "What matters is where you get your carbs from," says Glassman. (Source - Women’s Health)

 

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Adam Savage from Myth Busters dancing to the Doctor Who theme played by tesla coils.

My life is now complete.

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MythBusters create the Mona Lisa in .008 seconds.

Using 1000s of pounds of aluminium and steel, a mile of high-pressure air hose, hundreds of pounds of compressed air and 1,100 specifically-addressed paintballs (+1,100 barrels), MythBusters created the Mona Lisa in 0.008 seconds flat.

The perfect juxtaposition between art and science.

Dream job, much?

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