moskovitz

Zuckerberg decides he won't sell Facebook at least for another year

Facebook’s stocks have been going down and a few big investors have already decided to sell their shares in the company.  Zuckerberg stated this past Tuesday that he will not be selling facebook at least for another year.  

“The news that Zuckerberg won’t be selling comes after two big Facebook names did dump some of their shares. Early investor Peter Thiel nearly cashed out completely in August, followed by a smaller sale from Facebook co-founder Dustin Moskovitz a few days later.”

I’ve been reading Lost in the Mirror and I’m not sure how I feel about the analogies made between archaeology and BPD.

Archaeology is / was a love of mine but reading this book is triggering me to bits. I always wanted to do something within archaeology (it’s what my degree is in) but it’s just a constant reminder of how hopeless and useless I am and what a mess my life has become. Thanks Dr. Moskovitz, I know you mean well, but fucking hell!

Ugh.

  • After three years, several hundred interviews and trips that took them from Washington think tanks such as the Brookings Institution to health clinics in Myanmar and rural villages in Kenya, they have narrowed their interests to four major “buckets”: U.S. policy, global catastrophic risks, international aid and science.
  • Arrillaga-Andreessen, wife of Netscape founder Marc Andreessen and who teaches courses at Stanford about philanthropy, has advised numerous tech billionaires — including Tuna and Moskovitz — about their charitable work.
  • “The world is a big, complicated system,” Tuna said, “and I feel we need to be as smart as we can be in order to stand a chance of having an impact with the resources we have — which are significant in one sense but really small in comparison to the kinds of the problems we want to work on.”

today i went to the library and checked out five books about judaism, jewish conversion, and jewish traditions/holidays. i’m excited to start exploring the history and customs of jewish culture and learn more about the conversion process. these are the books i checked out: 

  • conversion to judaism: a guidebook, lawrence j. epstein
  • embracing the covenant: converts to judaism talk about why and how, edited by rabbi allan l. berkowitz and patti moskovitz
  • the women’s seder sourcebook: rituals & readings for use at the passover seder, edited by rabbi sharon cohen anisfeld, tara mohr, and catherine spector
  • the synagogue survival kit, jordan lee wagner
  • their stories, our stories: women of the bible, rose sallberg kam*

*to my knowledge, this book isn’t specifically jewish, but it’s a part of biblical/jewish history i’m very interested in exploring. 

The First 25 People On Facebook

Today is Facebook’s ninth birthday. Meet the students who celebrated its birth — and find out where they are now.

Amie Broder

Broder, two years ahead of the Facebook founders at Harvard, went on to NYU Law School and a job at the law firm Simpson Thacher. She’s now an associate at Troutman Sanders, and in 2012, was named by Law & Politics as a “rising star” in tax law.

troutmansanders.com

Ada McMahon

McMahon lives in New Orleans, where she works as a media fellow for Bridge the Gulf, a group of citizen journalists collecting stories from the Gulf Coast in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. McMahon also blogs for The Huffington Post.

Billy Olson

Olson, the fourth roommate in Zuckerberg, Hughes, and Moskovitz’s suite, was “an amateur thespian with an impish streak,” according to David Kirkpatrick, author of The Facebook Effect. In The Social Network, Olson has the bright idea of comparing students to farm animals. While his friends all went on to become billionaires, Olson took time off from Harvard and never graduated, said a Harvard official. Still, he ended up making friends with a tight-knit group of younger students, with whom he is still close, according to a former classmate. Friends said Olson had become a firefighter in his hometown of Briarcliff Manor, New York.

sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net

Hilary Scurlock Cocalis

Previously with the Bleacher Report, Cocalis is now the marketing manager for MiresBall, a branding agency in San Diego.

sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net


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Nina Easton reimagina para Fortune Magazine una clase que brinda resultados, basada en los logros que Eva Moskovitz ha obtenido en la escuela que fundó. Sus claves para los maestros son:

  • Los niños deben luchar
  • El ajedrez es la clave para construir mentes ágiles
  • Asume que todos tus estudiantes irán a la universidad
  • Extiende las mismas expectativas de ir a la universidad a tus estudiantes con necesidades especiales
  • No mimos para los maestros (pero, paguenles más)
  • Los directores, no unicamente los maestros, tienen que conocer a sus estudiantes

fotografía por Fluteflute (Own work) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Could you be my Human

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by yunchuyin

首先,你得,有,一只,龙。

Words: 3162, Chapters: 1/1, Language: 中文



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Because it's a Circle

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by laliquey

From this kinkmeme prompt:

During the lawyer up asshole scene, Eduardo pulls out a ring box and throws it at Mark telling him sadly or bitterly (or both), “I kept this with me all summer waiting for the perfect moment.”

Mark’s absolutely stunned (and had no idea Eduardo felt that way about him), and now that he knows, he’s obsessed with the ring and won’t stop bugging an exasperated and justifiably frustrated Eduardo.

Words: 2864, Chapters: 1/1, Language: English



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My friend, and CTO at the time, Dustin Moskovitz pulled me into a room one morning. He told me I would no longer be working on News Feed, which was surprising because at the time I was the only engineer keeping it running. via Pocket

I almost got fired once.

My friend, and CTO at the time, Dustin Moskovitz pulled me into a room one morning. He told me I would no longer be working on News Feed, which was surprising because at the time I was the only engineer keeping it running. Instead they were going to hand it off to someone else and build a team around that person. With alarm in my voice I asked if I was being fired. Dustin relented only after a telling pause: “no, but you need to find something else to do.“

I believe if you looked at what I had accomplished in my two years at Facebook to that point, it would not be obvious that I should be a candidate for such a stern conversation. In addition to building the backend and ranking for News Feed I had also launched a number of other popular features on the site. I maintained our early anti-abuse efforts in my spare time. I was one of a small group of people making decisions that would shape our infrastructure for years to come. I wasn’t the best engineer at the company but I was solid, I was dedicated, and I was clearly having an impact.

So why was I being sidelined? I demanded answers. Dustin did not disappoint.

He gave me a single sheet of paper. On it, in a dull monospace font, were anonymous quotes about me from my coworkers.

“Boz is one of the better engineers at Facebook” one read, and then the next "I would have a hard time working with him.”

These two statements struck me as incongruous. If I was a good engineer, why would it be hard to work with me? Of course that question was the very foundation of my problem.

“He is most interested in the truth…but more inhibited members of the team avoid any discussions with him.“

The realization hit me hard. In short, I thought my job was to be right. I thought that was how I proved my worth to the company. But that was all wrong. My job was to get things done and doing anything meaningful past a certain point requires more than one person. If you are right but nobody wants to work with you, then how valuable are you really? How much can you realistically expect to accomplish on your own? I was “winning” my way out of a job one argument at a time.

I headed home early that day to think about what I had heard. My future wife April was gentle but she offered me little reprieve from the feedback: “If you want people to work with you, you need to be kind.” It turns out this wasn’t just a problem I had at work. Looking back, I’m amazed (and grateful) that my friends put up with me.

Altogether this feedback changed the course of my career and probably my life.

I don’t think I was ever outright mean to anyone. I was just callously indifferent and on a long enough timeline that is indistinguishable from being mean. In a cruel twist of irony I thought that was what it meant to be professional. In retrospect it just seems inhuman. It will take me several posts to details the many mistakes that got me to this point, but my biggest lesson was the importance of kindness.

Being kind isn’t the same as being nice. It isn’t about superficial praise. It doesn’t mean dulling your opinions. And it shouldn’t diminish the passion with which you present them.

Being kind is fundamentally about taking responsibility for your impact on the people around you. It requires you be mindful of their feelings and considerate of the way your presence affects them.

Being kind hasn’t hurt my effectiveness at all. Being thoughtful about the emotions of my colleagues hasn’t made me any less right or wrong, it has simply made me more likely to be asked to help in the first place. Being invited to more conversations has allowed me to scale my impact in a way that would have been unfathomable on my own.

I’m still not as good as I’d like to be at any of this. When I’m under stress I can sometimes fall back into my old habits. But believing deeply that I am responsible for how I make others feel has been life changing for me. Being kind turns out to be a long term strategy for maximizing impact.

Published May 11, 2015
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My friend, and CTO at the time, Dustin Moskovitz pulled me into a room one morning. He told me I would no longer be working on News Feed, which was surprising because at the time I was the only engineer keeping it running.

Be Kind

“My friend, and CTO at the time, Dustin Moskovitz pulled me into a room one morning. He told me I would no longer be working on News Feed, which was surprising because at the time I was the only engineer keeping it running. Instead they were going to hand it off to someone else and build a team around that person.”

Read more on boz.com or discuss it on HN.

Waves and Both of Us

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by hapakitsune

Within five minutes of meeting her roommate, Dusty is half in love.

Words: 4164, Chapters: 1/1, Language: English



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