monumentsmatter

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BLM Winter Bucket List #23: Vermilion Cliffs National Monument, Arizona, for Spectacular Geologic Features and Superbowl 49

This month, Phoenix, Arizona, is a buzz with #superbowl news.  As the state prepares for the big event, we’ll share information about beautiful public lands just outside of the city and others worth a day trip - like Vermilion Cliffs.

Located on the Colorado Plateau in northern Arizona, the Vermilion Cliffs National Monument includes the Paria Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness. This remote and unspoiled 280,000-acre Monument - a part of the BLM’s National Conservation Lands - is a geologic treasure, containing a variety of diverse landscapes from the Paria Plateau, Vermilion Cliffs, Coyote Buttes, and Paria Canyon. 

Visitors enjoy scenic views of towering cliffs and deep canyons. The colorful swirls of cross-bedded sandstone in Coyote Buttes are an international hiking destination.  A permit is required for hiking in Coyote Buttes North (the Wave), Coyote Buttes South, and for overnight trips within Paria Canyon. 

Whether you’re heading to the #superbowl or just want an unforgettable outdoor experience, Vermilion Cliffs is a must see! http://bit.ly/vermilioncliffs

Photos by Bob Wick, BLM Wilderness Specialist

#mypubliclands
On this day in 2011, the Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument in Arizona, Agua Fria National Monument in Arizona, and the California Coastal National Monument in California were designated through Presidential proclamation. All three monuments are a part of the BLM’s National Conservation Lands.

Pictured here, the Grand Canyon-Parashant National Monument - managed jointly by BLM and National Park Service - is a vast, biologically diverse landscape encompassing an array of scientific and historic objects. Valuable geological resources are located within the Monument boundaries, including relatively undeformed and unobscured Paleozoic and Mesozoic sedimentary rock layers and abundant fossils, which offer a clear view of the geologic history of the Colorado Plateau. The Monument also contains outstanding biological resources including giant Mojave yucca, trophy-quality mule deer, California condor, desert tortoise, and southwestern willow flycatcher.
Photo by Bob Wick, BLM

#landscape #Arizona #California #monumentsmatter #nationalconservationlands #nationalparksservice #mypubliclands #scenic #happybirthday #geological #wildlife #travel #history #onthisday #instagood #instacool #photooftheday #SeeBLM

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Happy Anniversary Antiquities Act!

On June 8, 1906, President Theodore Roosevelt signed the Antiquities Act into law, which authorized all future presidents to protect historic landmarks or objects of “scientific interest” on public lands as national monuments.

While most national monuments are established by the President, Congress also has established national monuments protecting natural or historic features. Since 1906, the President and Congress have created more than 100 national monuments. They are currently managed by multiple agencies, including the National Park Service, Forest Service, Fish and Wildlife Service, and the Bureau of Land Management.

The photo collection here reflects the diversity and beauty of the BLM-managed national monuments, a part of the BLM’s National Conservation Lands. Photos by Bob Wick, BLM Wilderness Specialist.

More love for America’s newest National Monument! Curated photos on the Flickr blog- simply breathtaking.

New U.S. National Monument in New Mexico | Flickr Blog

On May 21, 2014, a nearly 500,000-acre area in the southern part of New Mexico was designated by President Barack Obama as the Organ Mountains-Desert Peaks National Monument. Now protected by the Bureau of Land Management, it features picturesque mountain ranges, the Kilbourne Hole, historical sites…

Read More

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Located on the Colorado Plateau in northern Arizona, the Vermilion Cliffs National Monument in Arizona includes the Paria Canyon-Vermilion Cliffs Wilderness. This remote and unspoiled, 280,000-acre Monument - a part of the BLM’s National Conservation Lands - is a geologic treasure, containing a variety of diverse landscapes from the Paria Plateau, Vermilion Cliffs, Coyote Buttes, and Paria Canyon. 

Visitors enjoy scenic views of towering cliffs and deep canyons. Paria Canyon offers an outstanding three to five day wilderness backpacking experience. The colorful swirls of cross-bedded sandstone in Coyote Buttes are an international hiking destination.

A permit is required for hiking in Coyote Buttes North (the Wave), Coyote Buttes South, and for overnight trips within Paria Canyon. Visit the BLM Arizona’s website to learn more about this beautiful area and plan your visit.

Photos by Bob Wick, BLM Wilderness Specialist

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On this day in 2001, the Carrizo Plain, Sonoran Desert, Pompeys Pillar, Upper Missouri River Breaks, and Kasha-Katuwe Tent Rocks National Monuments were established by Presidential Proclamation. 

CLICK HERE to learn more about the national monuments managed by the BLM’s National Conservation Lands.

Photo by Bob Wick, BLM

Beautiful shot of the Sonoran Desert National Monument in Arizona, which contains more than 487,000 acres of Sonoran Desert landscape. The Sonoran Desert is the most biologically diverse of the North American deserts and includes an the extensive saguaro cactus forest.

The dust from a recent storm front made for interesting backlighting of the rich Sonoran vegetation at the national monument.

Photo by Bob Wick, BLM Wilderness Specialist for the BLM’s National Conservation Lands.

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Today’s Summer Bucket List includes a trip to the moon, Craters of the Moon National Monument that is.

Managed jointly by the Bureau of Land Management and the National Park Service, Craters of the Moon, is a geologic wonder in a uniquely preserved volcanic landscape whose central focus is the Great Rift, a 62-mile long crack in the Earth’s crust. Craters, cinder coves, lava tubes, deep cracks, and vast lava fields form a strangely beautiful volcanic sea on central Idaho’s Snake River Plain. At first glance the landscape of Craters of the Moon appears to be devoid of life. Look deeper and you will observe a rich diversity of life including more than 750 types of plants and almost 300 animal species (not including insects!).

Local legends made references to the landscape resembling the surface of the moon. Some even referred to the area as the “Valley of the Moon.” In fact, the second group of astronauts to walk on the moon visited Craters of the Moon in 1969 to study the volcanic geology and to explore an unusual and harsh environment in preparation for their trip to space.

The National Monument became known as Craters of the Moon when Robert Limbert used the name in an article for a national magazine. Limbert was the first man to thoroughly explore and promote the area. The name became official with the establishment of the monument in 1924.

Visit the following websites for information about Craters of the Moon:

http://www.nps.gov/crmo/index.htm
http://www.blm.gov/id/st/en/prog/blm_special_areas/craters_of_the_moon.html

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BLM Winter Bucket List #10: Ironwood Forest National Monument, Arizona, for Mild Temperatures and Winter Photography

Taking its name from one of the longest living trees in the Arizona desert, the Ironwood Forest National Monument protects 129,000 acres of spectacular Sonoran Desert mountains blanketed with saguaro cacti and ironwood trees. The winter light on the photogenic peaks - plus an average January high temperature of 65 degrees F - make the Ironwood an appealing wintertime public lands destination.

Ragged Top Mountain is the biological and geological crown jewel of the national monument. Several endangered and threatened species live here, including the Nichols turk’s head cactus and the lesser long-nosed bat. The national monument also contains habitat for the cactus ferruginous pygmy owl. The desert bighorn sheep dwelling in the region are the last viable population indigenous to the Tucson basin. The area holds abundant rock art sites and other archaeological objects of scientific interest.

Learn more about Ironwood Forest NM: http://www.blm.gov/az/st/en/prog/blm_special_areas/natmon/ironwood.html

Photos by Bob Wick, BLM

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Vintage Poster Series: Celebrating America’s Newest Conservation System!

On Earth Day 2014, the Bureau of Land Management introduced three vintage posters depicting some of the spectacular landscapes of our National Conservation Lands. The BLM is proud to share the next three posters in this ongoing series:  

The BLM’s National Conservation Lands - also called the National Landscape Conservation System - conserves, protects, and restores nationally-significant landscapes and places that have outstanding cultural, ecological, and scientific values for the benefit of current and future generations. These lands include 900 areas (more than 30 million acres) of National Monuments, National Conservation Areas, Wilderness Areas, and other federally-designated special places. 

See all vintage posters in the series to date with beautiful photos of the areas on the My Public Lands Flickr site: http://bit.ly/1zMc1cN

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BLM Winter Bucket List #24: Santa Rosa-San Jacinto Mountains National Monument, California, for Rugged Trails

Rising abruptly from the desert floor, the Santa Rosa and San Jacinto Mountains National Monument reaches an elevation of 10,834 feet at the summit of Mount San Jacinto.  Providing a picturesque backdrop to local communities, the National Monument is a desirable backcountry destination that can be accessed via trails from both the valley floor and the alpine village of Idyllwild. The best time of year for hiking lower elevation trails is November through April.

The National Monument’s boundary encompasses about 280,000 acres, including 67,000 acres within the San Jacinto Ranger District of the San Bernardino National Forest, and 97,000 acres within the Bureau of Land Management’s California Desert Conservation Area.  The National Monument, a part of the BLM’s National Conservation Lands, includes two federal wilderness areas as well as lands owned and administered by multiple local organizations. 

Many trails are open to all forms of non-motorized travel – hiking, horseback riding, and mountain biking – but not all trails are open to everyone.  Check with the appropriate agency if you don’t know the rules. Be safe and enjoy!  http://on.doi.gov/1ulnSAM

Photos by Bob Wick, BLM

Milky Way near Butterfield Pass in the BLM-managed Sonoran Desert National Monument

This area is probably only 30-40 air miles from Phoenix, and the glow from the city is visible to the north.  However, the overhead stars and southern horizon are dark enough to clearly see the Milky Way, which makes a great backdrop to the charismatic saguaros. 

-Bob Wick, BLM Wilderness Specialist

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#GetOutdoors and enjoy your public lands today!

Located off the 1,100 miles of California coastline, the BLM-managed California Coastal National Monument comprises more than 20,000 small islands, rocks, exposed reefs, and pinnacles between Mexico and Oregon. The monument provides feeding and nesting habitat for an estimated 200,000 breeding seabirds as well as forage and breeding habitat for marine mammals including the southern sea otters and California sea lions.

Photos: Bob Wick, Wilderness Specialist for the BLM’s National Conservation Lands