My Gut

This morning, I woke-up to a note from ubiome saying that my gut sample was ready to be viewed. 

After one of Open mHealth’s advisory board meetings, I had dinner with my colleagues, Ida Sim (openmhealth), John Mattison (Kaiser Permanente) and Patti Brennan (University of Wisconsin/Project Health Design). We talked about this and that and the topic of gut came up—mind you they are all clinicians. 

We were discussing some of Larry Smar’s work on microbacteria and how we was able to model his own illness with data. Larry also 3-d printed his colon…which is pretty awesome. 

It got me thinking. I’ve continuously had issues with my gut ever since I was a boy. Each and everyday is a big “?” to know what is going to happen. Sometimes eating wheat hurts. Sometimes it doesn’t. Sometimes eating spicy hurts. Sometimes it doesn’t.  

I went to a GI doc and while really kind, she wanted to overload me with super expensive tests to understand what was going on (a blood test, stool sample, endoscopy and respiratory exam). I took the blood sample and it showed that I might have IBD or Celiac disease. Note: I have only taken the blood test and need to complete the rest to get my results. 

The testing sophistication for most gut problems is still nascent and I get why she wanted to do so many test to be able to triangulate what and where the problem is.

Frustrated because my insurance wouldn’t cover the bulk of the cost of the endoscopy, I decided to hold off from testing and go the DIY route. 

I ordered a Ubiome gut sample. Shipping was fast and the packaging and instructions were pleasant to read. 

I sent off the sample in January and just got the results this morning. 

I’m breaking up the data by phylum, class, order, family and genus. I’ve also selected the filter for Healthy Omnivore to do my comparisons. 

Phylum

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Class

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Order 

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Family

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Genus

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From the data and compared to a healthy omnivore, it seems like I have a deficiency in bacteroidetes (by at least half the average). Apparently, high amounts of bacteroidetes is common in Western diets. I live in Brooklyn and am an omnivore, so not sure why I have such a deficiency. 

At the genus level, I seem to have high amounts of Lactobacillus, which from the looks of it means I’m doing good at protecting my other microbacteria. 

Even though it’s kinda hard to compare different types of microbacteria against each other, the good thing is I can try to figure out how to add more bacteroidetes to my diet. 

Speaking of diet, it’s breakfast time, what should I eat? 

 

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