Minneapolis skyline from inside the Metrodome

Photo by AboveTheNorm

Shooter Now: Vikings' Zygi Wilf might OK Metrodome site, after all

Zygi Wilf was expected in town as early as Tuesday, and one insider says the Vikings owner reluctantly will accept the Metrodome site for a newly constructed stadium, although nothing is final. One mechanism to finance the proposed $ 918 million stadium is expected to be tax revenue that currently supports the Minneapolis Convention Center. […] http://dlvr.it/176QDQ

Shooter Now: Vikings' Zygi Wilf might OK Metrodome site, after all

Zygi Wilf was expected in town as early as Tuesday, and one insider says the Vikings owner reluctantly will accept the Metrodome site for a newly constructed stadium, although nothing is final. One mechanism to finance the proposed $ 918 million stadium is expected to be tax revenue that currently supports the Minneapolis Convention Center. […] http://dlvr.it/176f12

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Metrodome Demolition from Parking Lot of First Covenant Church via Daniel Collison

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The Metrodome Rock

It’s the last sporting event ever at the Metrodome today as the Vikings take on the Lions. So, here is a neat blurb from Ballpark Magic, that tells the story of a boulder unearthed at the Metrodome site in 1980, and what reads on a plaque at a suburban bank in Plymouth…

This rock, estimated to weigh 125 tons, was unearthed January 2, 1980, at the site of the Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome in downtown Minneapolis.

Having endured centuries of glacial action and wind and water erosion, the rock was set to be destroyed by explosives at the stadium site when the First National Bank of Minneapolis stepped in to preserve it as a landmark for the city of Plymouth.

The bank enlisted the aid of the Soo Line Railroad Company and a heavy-duty hauler to transport the rock from downtown Minneapolis to Plymouth. The two-day move, which coincided with the grand opening of the bank’s Plymouth Office, was completed on March 3, 1980.

The granite boulder, composed primarily of potassium feldspar and quartz, is estimated to be approximately 1.8 billion years old and could be much older. It is similar to rocks found near St. Cloud, Minnesota, and may have been deposited in Minneapolis during the glacial activity of the ice age some 11,000 years ago. The size of the rock suggests it was part of a knob broken away from a low hill.

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