methylisothiazolinone

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PERSONAL CARE PRODUCT CHEMICALS:  Consumers & Physicians Have Reported that Preservative “MI” Triggers Wicked Symptoms—But ‘MI’ is Still in the Products. Can Media Attention Convince Big Corporations to Stop Using It?

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We have reported on this potentially pernicious preservative several times over the past few years—including research findings conducted by a dermatologist linking MI to a host of serious reactions. The UK has pulled it, yet incredibly, rather than stop using it as a preservative, big corporations in the U.S. have increased its use in personal care products over the past several years.

Preservative methylisothiazolinone (or MI) is linked with nerve damage, scarring, eczema„ and a host of other serious reactions. It can be found in over 2,400 products in the U.S. including mouthwash, shampoo, hand wipes, baby wipes, sunscreens, body moisturizers and lotions.

Growing Scrutiny for an Allergy Trigger Used in Personal Care …

New York Times

Efforts to reduce the use of MI underscore a broader challenge for consumer product manufacturers, which are under increasing pressure to respond to public concerns about potentially harmful or synthetic chemicals.

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SOLUTION: Read the ingredients labels on all products prior to purchase.  Say “no” to methylisothiazolinone (or MI).  Consider writing an email or leaving a comment on the social networking sites of companies like Colgate-Palmolive and others that use MI, telling them why you are no longer purchasing their products.

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The dermatitis society named MI [methylisothiazolinone] its “allergen of the year” in 2013, a listing intended to give attention to problematic and often obscure substances. That same year, the Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety, a European advisory group, said that MI should be used only in limited quantities for rinse-off products, like soaps and shampoos, and that “no safe concentrations” existed for leave-on products like lotions.

Growing Scrutiny for an Allergy Trigger Used in Personal Care Products

By Rachel Abrams, NY Times, Jan. 23, 2015

Because she has an eczema condition, Michelle Kirn intently reads ingredient labels on baby wipes, soaps and other household items to avoid allergic reactions that she says were caused by a commonly used preservative.

Ms. Kirn, 37, says she believes that nerve damage and scarring to her hands stemmed from using wipes that contained the preservative methylisothiazolinone, or MI.

Still, when her throat began to swell, she says she did not think to check the label of her new mouthwash, Colgate Total Lasting White.

“I thought I was developing allergies to foods,” Ms. Kirn, a consultant in Breinigsville, Pa., said. “I felt like I constantly had a sore throat.”

Colgate-Palmolive introduced that product in August, and it may be the only popular mouthwash to contain MI, an ingredient added to deter the growth of bacteria. But it can cause rashes and skin irritations in people who are allergic to it. The company chose that preservative, according to Stephanie Clark, a spokeswoman for Colgate, because it worked best for that particular formula.

Experts say it’s an unusual additive for a mouthwash, an expansion of the chemical into products occurring at the same time that major consumer products companies—including Kimberly-Clark, Johnson & Johnson and Unilever—have begun removing it from lotions and wipes.

“It’s not a preservative that we’ve seen commonly in products that are used anywhere but on the skin,” Dr. Bruce A. Brod, president-elect of the American Contact Dermatitis Society, said. “When people are exposed on a daily basis to MI, we think the rates of sensitization are going up.”

Compounding the problem, Dr. Brod said, is a lack of awareness among both patients and doctors. Ms. Kirn said her hands “looked like I had been in a fire” several months after she began using Huggies Simply Clean wipes, but she didn’t discover her allergy to the product until months later.

The dermatitis society named MI its “allergen of the year” in 2013, a listing intended to give attention to problematic and often obscure substances. That same year, the Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety, a European advisory group, said that MI should be used only in limited quantities for rinse-off products, like soaps and shampoos, and that “no safe concentrations” existed for leave-on products like lotions.

In the United States, MI can be found in Unilever’s Dove shampoo, Beiersdorf’s Nivea moisturizer, some of Johnson & Johnson’s Neutrogena sunscreens and dozens of other personal care items that line drugstore shelves. Between 2007 and 2010, the number of products that used it more than doubled to about 2,400 items, according to an estimate from the dermatitis society.

Efforts to reduce the use of MI underscore a broader challenge for consumer product manufacturers, which are under increasing pressure to respond to public concerns about potentially harmful or synthetic chemicals.

Often, companies say, there is little if any scientific evidence to prove that a particular ingredient targeted by upset consumers is actually dangerous. Eliminating controversial ingredients can also restrict alternative options.

Dr. Brod and others say that the solution may not be to remove MI entirely, but rather to increase public awareness that some products containing it could cause allergic reactions.

“Everything is a balancing act. You want to have a safe product, but you want to minimize the amount that you’re sensitizing the public to rashes.”

Kimberly-Clark, the maker of Ms. Kirn’s Huggies Simply Clean wipes, no longer uses MI in its baby wipes, and will have completely removed it from feminine care wipes by April, according to Bob Brand, a spokesman.

“We are very sorry she experienced difficulties,” Mr. Brand said. “The levels of MI previously used in our wipes products were always well within the guidelines recommended by regulatory agencies.”

Experiment

Ok y’all so in light of the fact that my mom found a news alert about the preservative methylisothiazolinone, I decided to look through all of my skin products and see what they had.
Welll two of my favorite facial cleansers have parabens in them….cetaphil and cerave also do….the st. ives green tea cleanser has the MI in it….yeah I was starting to get scared. Some of them had the MI preservative that can cause eczema and other skin allergies.

Curél, Pacifica, and queen Helene passed the two tests. The st. Ives naturally soothing oatmeal and she’s butter lotion passes as well.

So back to the experiment….
I have decided to try and remove all products with those two items from my routine. It’s making things very limited (and I already used head and shoulders which had methylisothiazolinone) but I’m gonna see if I get a marked improvement in my skin and overall appearance.

Wish me luck.

Latest news & tips from Botanicals: MI allergy on the increase

A new post has been published at http://blog.botanicals.co.uk/mi-allergy-on-the-increase/

MI allergy on the increase

There have been a number of reports in this week’s national press about people suffering allergic reactions to skincare products containing MI (methylisothiazolinone). It’s used as a preservative in products ranging from body scrubs to moisturisers, sunscreens to wet wipes. We…

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PERSONAL CARE PRODUCT CHEMICALS:  Preservatives in Cosmetics/Sanitary Products Linked to Allergic Reactions of Epidemic Proportions—New Study


"Sources of exposure were diverse, including moist tissue wipes, cleaners, toners, shower gel, shave foam, mascara, hair products and washing up liquid."

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Beauty Lotions, Other Household Products Accused Of Causing Skin Allergy

Itching, hives, redness, and facial swelling are common symptoms linked to the use of certain beauty lotions and sanitary products.

dermatologists have connected two key preservatives in many cosmetic and sanitary products to cases of acute allergic contact dermatitis.

The preservatives known as MI and MCI have been found in Nivea skin lotion, some L’Oréal creams, and Wet Ones cleaning wipes, not to mention other varieties of mascara and shower gels. The majority of the allergic reactions occurred in women over the age of 40, with exposure to the preservatives resulting in facial swelling, hives, itching, and redness…

The American Contact Dermatitis Society named MI “contact allergen of the year” for 2013, in order to generate awareness of the preservative’s potentially harmful effects.

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The preservatives MI and MCI have been used since the 1980s in more industrial products, such as wall paint, and have only recently started to appear in cosmetic products. The preservatives full names are methylisothiazolinone (MI) and methylchloroisothiazolinone (MCI).

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Latest news & tips from Botanicals Blog

A new post has been published at http://blog.botanicals.co.uk/cosmetic-chemicals-blamed-for-skin-allergy-epidemic/

Cosmetic chemicals blamed for skin allergy epidemic

Products from Boots, Wet wipes and Nivea are said to contain significant levels of MI. A staggering one in five children now suffer from eczema, with contact dermatitis being the most common condition. The British Association of Dermatologists is warning that a chemical found in everyday…

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PERSONAL CARE PRODUCT / COSMETICS CHEMICALS: 

Preservative ‘Methylisothiazolinone’ Linked with Spike in Allergic Reactions

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Allergy to Moistened Wipes Rising, Says Dermatologist

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A dermatologist says a preservative in many pre-moistened wipes is linked to a dramatic rise in allergic reactions. The allergen, a chemical preservative referred to as MI, is found in many water-based products like liquid soaps, hair products, sunscreen, cosmetics, laundry products and cleaners as well as pre-moistened personal hygiene products and baby wipes. The irritated skin can be red, raised, itchy and even blistery, appearing much like a reaction to poison ivy. The three most common areas affected by the allergic reaction include the face, from using soaps and shampoos, the fingers and hands, from handling the wipes, and the buttocks and genitals from using moistened flushable wipes…

The irritated skin can be red, raised, itchy and even blistery, appearing much like a reaction to poison ivy. The three most common areas affected by the allergic reaction include the face, from using soaps and shampoos, the fingers and hands, from handling the wipes, and the buttocks and genitals from using moistened flushable wipes.

Growing Scrutiny for an Allergy Trigger Used in Personal Care Products

While some consumer products companies are removing the chemical, methylisothiazolinone, others are adding it to offerings including mouthwash.




from NYT > Home Page http://do.co.vu/1CMQuld