meshnet

Project Meshnet looks to evolve internet into encrypted decentralized network

Our objective is to create a versatile, decentralized network built on secure protocols for routing traffic over private mesh or public internetworks independent of a central supporting infrastructure.

Recent events around the world have demonstrated the importance of the free flow of information in regards to human rights and the free exercise thereof. Unfortunately, existing infrastructure is susceptible to a number of critical flaws that render it vulnerable to disruption. This project hopes to supplement the current infrastructure to create a secure, independent network that can operate under any condition including natural disaster or general failure of existing infrastructure.

READ MORE ON PROJECT MESHNET

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Meshnet activists rebuilding the Internet from scratch
August 12, 2013

Fed up with government spying, some people have decided to take matters into their own hands, and are building a user-owned Internet from scratch, using meshnets, New Scientist reports.

These wireless networks are intended to permit secure communication without surveillance or any centralized organization, and ultimately, if their designers get their way, they will span the country.

Each node in the mesh, consisting of a radio transceiver and a computer, relays messages from other parts of the network. If the data can’t be passed by one route, the meshnet finds an alternative way through to its destination.

Hyperboria, the virtual layer that underpins meshnet efforts in the U.S., is a virtual meshnet because it runs through the existing Internet, but is purely peer-to-peer. This means people who use it exchange information with others directly over a completely encrypted connection, with nothing readable by any centralized servers.

When physical meshnet nodes like those in Maryland and Seattle are set up, existing Hyperboria connections can simply be routed through them.

Source

Using a peer-to-peer approach FNF (as well as other groups such as Project Mesh Net and Open-Mesh.org ) are working on developing a “mesh” approach to the internet which, theoretically would be free, ubiquitous and anonymous.  Others are revisiting older tech such as HAM or CB radio based packet radio systems as stand alone systems or as nodes in an newly emerging alternative internet.

What is coming into focus is that a group of diverse entities and technologies, when taken together, have the capacity to challenge corporate and governmental control over the current form of the internet as well as the information, political and economic activity and freedom of expression found there.  If such a “meshnet” does come into existence, we can expect a vigorous reaction by governments the world over. However, where there is no “there” there to regulate, where the transactions are anonymous and essentially untraceable, it remains unclear what steps will be available to a government to assert control over such a system, but we can certainly expect them to try.

vimeo

Project Meshnet aims to build a censorship-free alternative to the Internet

from Project Meshnet:

Our objective is to create a versatile, decentralized network built on secure protocols for routing traffic over private mesh or public internetworks independent of a central supporting infrastructure.

[via kurzweilai] [read more] [Project Meshnet]

Redditors have flocked over the last week to a new subgroup on Reddit.com they’re calling the Darknet Plan–or sometimes Meshnet, as the name seems to still be in flux–with the aim of building a mesh-based version of the Internet that wouldn’t be subject to the control of any corporation or government, with a focus on anonymity, peer-to-peer architecture and strong resistance to censorship.

In the last few days, about 10,000 users have joined the group, and about 200,000 have visited, according to Chris Bresee, the 17-year old Vermonter who founded the project and goes by the name “Wolfeater” on the site. Bresee, a high school senior, created the Darknet Plan more than a year ago, but he attributes the sudden spike in interest to the Stop Online Piracy Act and the awareness of the possibilities of government censorship that the bill has created: If passed in its current form, SOPA would use Domain Name System filtering to effectively disappear infringing sites from the Internet. “I would say the Darknet Plan is driven almost in its entirety by fear of censorship coming out of Congress,” says Bresee, whose Vermont senator Patrick Leahy introduced the precursor to SOPA known as Protect-IP.”That’s what’s driven me, and I think that’s what’s driven the other ten thousand users to join.”

Mesh networks are designed to allow users to connect to one another directly instead of to a centralized Internet service provider. Universities like John Hopkins and Purdue have experimented with building mesh network technologies, and the State Department and the One Laptop Per Child program have both developed their own versions of mesh networks to either circumvent censorship in foreign regimes or, in OLPC’s case, connect users who don’t have access to Internet service providers.

That kind of peer-to-peer networking sounds plausible in a dense urban setting, but becomes vastly harder or impossible when users are miles apart. So Bresee says Meshnet would start by aiming to create local clusters of users and connect them with the traditional Internet. “We would piggyback on the current infrastructure to connect these islands of meshes,” he says. “But as the mesh networks grow, less and less dependence on the ISPs would be needed.”

To get a sense of Meshnetters’ distribution, one user created this map that allows participants to register where they’re located.

Reddit’s leaderless, crowdsourced approach lacks the organization of any university or government group, and for now is hardly more than an abstract cyber-libertarian dream. So far, it’s consisted mostly of engineers within the group passing around technical papers and arguing about what sort of architecture the network will use. But Bresee says Meshnet’s lack of organization is partly the point: to build a fundamentally grassroots system without any government interference or dependence on a university. ”The problem with government projects is that there’s a mistrust of the government,” he says. “We want to connect all these communities, create one network, build it into something that would be more owned by the people than any corporations or government. We want to create an Internet that’s not dependent on the whims of any one group at all.”

You can check out the Darknet Plan’s progress here.

Imagine an Internet without censorship, an Internet built out of like-minded peers and secure connections. That’s the goal of Project Meshnet, PC World reports. Currently, each node connects to a couple other nodes by manually configuring links over an IPv4 network. The ultimate goal is to have every node connected directly by physical means; be it wire, optical cable or radio waves.” An experimental network by the name of Hyperboria, a network that apparently bears a resemblance to the “Internet of the late 1980s,” is already in place. More: Project Meshnet site. (via Project Meshnet aims to build a censorship-free alternative to the Internet | KurzweilAI)

This news story seamlessly combines quite a few of my favorite things in the world:

The world’s largest and most resilient BitTorrent site plans to redefine “cloud computing” with a plan to move at least some of its servers onto unmanned drones miles above Sweden. 

In a Sunday blog post, The Pirate Bay announced new “Low Orbit Server Stations” that will house the site’s servers and files on unmanned, GPS-controlled, aircraft drones.

One of the sites administrators, MrSpock, said with the advent of miniature computers such as the Raspberry Pi, a $35 micro computer the size of a thumb drive that includes a WiFi and SD card slot for storage, the site can take its servers far from any law enforcement.

“We’re going to experiment with sending out some small drones that will float some kilometers up in the air,” MrSpock wrote. “This way our machines will have to be shut down with aeroplanes in order to shut down the system. A real act of war.”

It’s not quite “internet in space,” but it’s getting there. I also love that they’re hip to the RasPi. Not to mention the poetry of using unmanned drones to piss off American lawmakers.

Users of the social news and community site Reddit don’t like the way the government seems to be muscling in on the Internet. So they plan to build a new one.

Redditors have flocked over the last week to a new subgroup on Reddit.com they’re calling the Darknet Plan–or sometimes Meshnet, as the name seems to still be in flux–with the aim of building a mesh-based version of the Internet that wouldn’t be subject to the control of any corporation or government, with a focus on anonymity, peer-to-peer architecture and strong resistance to censorship…

Read More Here…

Check out the Reddit Progress Page…

spread the werrrrrrd

Meshnet / Darknetplan

The Meshnet Project

Basically, Reddit users are attempting to organize and create an alternative source of internet to combat the possibility of being censored by the government & corporations, e.g. SOPA (Stop Online Piracy Act) which would effectively remove many websites from your reach by filtering them out of search engines.

It would give our government power over the internet similar to what they have in China.

The meshnet servers would be localized and user based.

Instead of having each user connect to large service providers like AT&T, etc…

Each user would be connected directly to other users on their local grid, each providing their own router and bandwidth, or somethin’ like that. I dunno, I’m not quite nerdy enough to understand how it works.

But I know I want in on it. Check it out.

Read more for FAQs

FAQ section, copied from the website

What is a mesh network?

A mesh network is basically a network where each client(user) directly connects to other clients in the network instead of all of the clients being attached to a cable leading to an Internet Service Provider. This is a distributed architecture which relies on the network participants themselves to provide the connections and routes for packets to flow across the network.

Why use mesh networks?

Mesh networking is a robust method of communications which provides excellent message handling in the event of natural disasters such as earthquakes, hurricanes, and floods. Because the infrastructure is owned by the participants, it also offers good resistance to corporate and government censorship. The democratic uprisings in the Middle East have clearly demonstrated Government’s eagerness to shut down communications networks when they are threatened. Because Mesh-networks are composed of private, citizen-owned communications infrastructure, they provide protection against corporate and government control.

Why is a mesh network better?

Since a mesh network is run by users instead of by an ISP, it is difficult to censor and/or shut down. The network would also be built to prevent spying by governments and corporations.

Why is a mesh network worse?

Mesh networks do not have the efficiency of planned point-to-point networks with known routing tables. Routing must be determined dynamically, and can result in redundant packets, network congestion, and slower transmission speeds. Mesh networks are particularly susceptible to “scaling” problems which may appear as an increasing number of nodes join the network.

What are the first steps to building this network?

The first steps are to finish development of needed software, and to establish local mesh networks across the United States and the world.

How can I help if I have no technological experience?

Spreading the word is the absolute best thing you can do right now. Tell everyone in your local area and get a group together that is close enough that each person can see at least one other’s home from wherever you are going to place the antenna. Once you have that, we will have a guide together soon about how to set up your network even if you’re not extremely tech savvy. For now, see the question below.

How can I establish a local meshnet?

This part is not ridiculously difficult even in rural areas. Find some neighbors and friends that would be willing to try it and are visible from at least one other house in the network. Next, you need to buy appropriate hardware (more on this soon) and use either professional or home made antenna boosters to connect wifi between each of the houses. There are guides online like this PDF which will explain this subject in-depth.

Where can I find a little more information?

There is a document that has been made with more technical information for those interested you can see here.

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Distributed Net Communities Happening Right Now

Mesh networks help people stay connected while avoiding traditional internet providers. Motivation around the country for creating community mesh networks ranges from a desire for social justice, improved information access during natural disasters or just the need to experiment.

A mesh network creates reliable and redundant wireless internet access. Instead of relying on a wired access point to the internet like a traditional network, a mesh network uses wireless radio nodes that speak to each other, thus creating decentralized wireless access points. Because a mesh network does not have to communicate through a central organization (like an ISP), if one node goes down the network will self heal — allowing service to continue without interruption.

You are probably wondering, how is this different than your WiFi at home? For one, mesh networks are actually wireless. If you think of your at-home wireless router, it is wired directly to the internet. Within a mesh network, only one node needs to be hardwired. All the other nodes, of which there could be hundreds, do not require direct access to the internet, just access to the mesh network itself. This allows a mesh network to operate without laying new cable, or as a local network during a service outage.

Links for the communities in the article:

The trick will be in the placement of the satellites themselves. Placed in low earth orbit by an amateur launch, the satellites would move too quickly to be of any real use in streaming Internet data to the ground. Placed higher up in geostationary orbit (more than 22,000 miles up), the signal lag becomes great enough to restrict what kind of Internet applications can be executed. And there’s also a touchy legal issue at play here, as the BBC points out. The unregulated nature of space means the Hackerspace group can do what they want. But should a nation like China decide it doesn’t want uncensored Internet streaming to its shores from space, there’s nothing really stopping it from blasting the satellites out of the sky either.

you gave me a life I never chose

‘One of the most striking examples of a darknet comes from Mexico where it was recently discovered that the the Zetas drug cartel has set up several private cell phone and radio repeater systems in the state of Veracruz as well as along 500 miles of the Texas-Mexico border.  Some portions of this system were in remote areas and were powered by solar cells, and used commercially available components. And, while it must be assumed that the tech was fairly easy to obtain, the know-how was a bit more specialized.   It is suspected that perhaps as many as two dozen communications workers have been kidnapped in Mexico by the cartel and forced to work putting these systems together. While a few were later released, most ended up dead or simply never seen again.

Online, darknets have been around for much longer.  The best known among them is TOR. While TOR provides resistance to censorship, government monitoring and traffic analysis, a fundamental weakness remains access to the internet.  One group that is currently working to ensure privacy and provide corporate-free access to the internet is the Free Network Foundation.

- Darknet Rising: Private, Secure and Anonymous Networks Emerging

anonymous asked:

Do you often feel as though no matter how many precautions you take to stay off the radar, you're still being traced no matter what? Also, how do you stay in contact with people? What email provider do you use?

With the extent to which the NSA has tapped into everything?

The centralized nature of the internet?

The constant release of information and leaks pertaining to government surveillance of everyday people?

Damn straight i know my attempts are futile!

join the initiative to create a new, decentralized internet here!

Worried about the NSA snooping on your email? Maybe you need to start creating your own personal internet

THE internet is neither neutral nor private, in case you were in any doubt. The US National Security Agency can reportedly collect nearly everything a user does on the net, while internet service providers (ISPs) move traffic according to business agreements, rather than what is best for its customers. So some people have decided to take matters into their own hands, and are building their own net from scratch.

Across the US, from Maryland to Seattle, work is underway to construct user-owned wireless networks that will permit secure communication without surveillance or any centralised organisation. They are known as meshnets and ultimately, if their designers get their way, they will span the country.

THE internet is neither neutral nor private, in case you were in any doubt. The US National Security Agency can reportedly collect nearly everything a user does on the net, while internet service providers (ISPs) move traffic according to business agreements, rather than what is best for its customers. So some people have decided to take matters into their own hands, and are building their own net from scratch.

Across the US, from Maryland to Seattle, work is underway to construct user-owned wireless networks that will permit secure communication without surveillance or any centralised organisation.

They are known as meshnets and ultimately, if their designers get their way, they will span the country. Dan Ryan is one of the leaders of the Seattle Meshnet project, where sparse coverage already exists thanks to radio links set up by fellow hackers. Those links mean that instead of communicating through commercial internet connections, meshnetters can talk to each other through a channel that they themselves control.

Each node in the mesh, consisting of a radio transceiver and a computer, relays messages from other parts of the network. If the data can’t be passed by one route, the meshnet finds an alternative way through to its destination. Ryan says the plan is for the Seattle meshnet to extend its coverage by linking up two wireless nodes across Lake Union in downtown Seattle. And over the country at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, student Alexander Bauer is hoping to build a campus meshnet later this year. That will give his fellow students an alternative communications infrastructure to the internet.

vimeo

Introduction to Meshnet: A decentralized alternative to the Internet.

p0st-sentience asked:

Oh and Lavaboom is worth looking into, it's an apparently NSA proof email service in beta testing at the moment. MeshNet is another cool project with similarities to tor which is aiming to create a public decentralized internet. Only downside is you have to install a virtual router onto a compatible machine which then becomes part of the larger web. Idk how much bandwidth this would use up or computing power...

Already signed all my emails up for Lavaboom access, am waiting for my beta confirmation email!  Everyone who wants to keep their mail private should go sign up for it right this moment!

Meshnet i have not heard of, but it is exactly the thing I’m interested in!  Thanks for bringing it up, it’s similar to an Othernet idea I had a while ago, I mean why does everyone have to connect to the router, when there are perfectly good cellphones all over the place capable of the same thing??  It’s like distributed generalised P2P <3

The only reason they have it set up the way they do at the moment is because its in the very beginnings of its development, but as for bandwidth I’d imagine its on a per-user basis, so the more people connected, the more processing it has to do.