merwomen

5.25.2013

This piece by Rosalind Spann entitled “Wave Dance” was part of a Fiberarts exhibit : “Mermaids and Merwomen in Black Folklore,” celebrating various visual histories and cultures of water goddesses that was held August 28 through October 28, 2012 at the City Gallery at Waterfront Park in Charleston, South Carolina. Displaying over 100 works of art, it was the single largest collection of mermaid-themed quilts and dolls to be housed under one roof. Even more fascinating was that the curator, Torreah “Cookie” Washington and all 66 participating artists from the United States and Canada were African-American.

For more information about “Mermaids and Merwomen in Black Folklore” exhibit, including obtaining the exhibit catalog, contact the curator, Cookie Washington at cookiesews1960@gmail.com.

youtube

This is the most inspired I’ve felt watching a video in months.

Jaded - Toyboy & Robin

5.3.2013

This piece by Kit Lang entitled “We are Mermaids Too” was part of a Fiberarts exhibit : “Mermaids and Merwomen in Black Folklore,” celebrating various visual histories and cultures of water goddesses that was held August 28 through October 28, 2012 at the City Gallery at Waterfront Park in Charleston, South Carolina. Displaying over 100 works of art, it was the single largest collection of mermaid-themed quilts and dolls to be housed under one roof. Even more fascinating was that the curator, Torreah “Cookie” Washington and all 66 participating artists from the United States and Canada were African-American.

For more information about “Mermaids and Merwomen in Black Folklore” exhibit, including obtaining the exhibit catalog, contact the curator, Cookie Washington at cookiesews1960@gmail.com.

6.19.2013

This piece by Gloria Grandy entitled “Malika ” was part of a Fiberarts exhibit : “Mermaids and Merwomen in Black Folklore,” celebrating various visual histories and cultures of water goddesses that was held August 28 through October 28, 2012 at the City Gallery at Waterfront Park in Charleston, South Carolina. Displaying over 100 works of art, it was the single largest collection of mermaid-themed quilts and dolls to be housed under one roof. Even more fascinating was that the curator, Torreah “Cookie” Washington and all 66 participating artists from the United States and Canada were African-American.

For more information about “Mermaids and Merwomen in Black Folklore” exhibit, including obtaining the exhibit catalog, contact the curator, Cookie Washington at cookiesews1960@gmail.com

5.1.2013

This piece by Cookie Keeling-Patterson entitled “Ree a Water Spirit” was part of a Fiberarts exhibit : “Mermaids and Merwomen in Black Folklore,” celebrating various visual histories and cultures of water goddesses that was held August 28 through October 28, 2012 at the City Gallery at Waterfront Park in Charleston, South Carolina. Displaying over 100 works of art, it was the single largest collection of mermaid-themed quilts and dolls to be housed under one roof. Even more fascinating was that the curator, Torreah “Cookie” Washington and all 66 participating artists from the United States and Canada were African-American.

For more information about “Mermaids and Merwomen in Black Folklore” exhibit, including obtaining the exhibit catalog, contact the curator, Cookie Washington at cookiesews1960@gmail.com.

6.27.2013

This piece by Arianne King Comer was part of a Fiberarts exhibit : “Mermaids and Merwomen in Black Folklore,” celebrating various visual histories and cultures of water goddesses that was held August 28 through October 28, 2012 at the City Gallery at Waterfront Park in Charleston, South Carolina. Displaying over 100 works of art, it was the single largest collection of mermaid-themed quilts and dolls to be housed under one roof. Even more fascinating was that the curator, Torreah “Cookie” Washington and all 66 participating artists from the United States and Canada were African-American.

For more information about “Mermaids and Merwomen in Black Folklore” exhibit, including obtaining the exhibit catalog, contact the curator, Cookie Washington at cookiesews1960@gmail.com

4.7.2013

This piece by Brenda Jones entitled, “Green Goddess” was part of a Fiberarts exhibit : “Mermaids and Merwomen in Black Folklore,” celebrating various visual histories and cultures of water goddesses that was held August 28 through October 28, 2012 at the City Gallery at Waterfront Park in Charleston, South Carolina. Displaying over 100 works of art, it was the single largest collection of mermaid-themed quilts and dolls to be housed under one roof. Even more fascinating was that the curator, Torreah “Cookie” Washington and all 66 participating artists from the United States and Canada were African-American.
For more information about “Mermaids and Merwomen in Black Folklore” exhibit, including obtaining the exhibit catalog, contact the curator, Cookie Washington at cookiesews1960@gmail.com.

6.25.2013

This piece by Pam Woolis entitled “The 30th Peace Angel” was part of a Fiberarts exhibit : “Mermaids and Merwomen in Black Folklore,” celebrating various visual histories and cultures of water goddesses that was held August 28 through October 28, 2012 at the City Gallery at Waterfront Park in Charleston, South Carolina. Displaying over 100 works of art, it was the single largest collection of mermaid-themed quilts and dolls to be housed under one roof. Even more fascinating was that the curator, Torreah “Cookie” Washington and all 66 participating artists from the United States and Canada were African-American.

For more information about “Mermaids and Merwomen in Black Folklore” exhibit, including obtaining the exhibit catalog, contact the curator, Cookie Washington at cookiesews1960@gmail.com

4.19.2013

This piece by Gloria Grandy entitled “Adilah the Just” was part of a Fiberarts exhibit : “Mermaids and Merwomen in Black Folklore,” celebrating various visual histories and cultures of water goddesses that was held August 28 through October 28, 2012 at the City Gallery at Waterfront Park in Charleston, South Carolina. Displaying over 100 works of art, it was the single largest collection of mermaid-themed quilts and dolls to be housed under one roof. Even more fascinating was that the curator, Torreah “Cookie” Washington and all 66 participating artists from the United States and Canada were African-American.

For more information about “Mermaids and Merwomen in Black Folklore” exhibit, including obtaining the exhibit catalog, contact the curator, Cookie Washington at cookiesews1960@gmail.com.

3.29.2013

This piece by LaQuita Tummings entitled, “Intertwined” was part of a Fiberarts exhibit : “Mermaids and Merwomen in Black Folklore,” celebrating various visual histories and cultures of water goddesses that was held August 28 through October 28, 2012 at the City Gallery at Waterfront Park in Charleston, South Carolina. Displaying over 100 works of art, it was the single largest collection of mermaid-themed quilts and dolls to be housed under one roof. Even more fascinating was that the curator, Torreah “Cookie” Washington and all 66 participating artists from the United States and Canada were African-American.
For more information about “Mermaids and Merwomen in Black Folklore” exhibit, including obtaining the exhibit catalog, contact the curator, Cookie Washington at cookiesews1960@gmail.com.

7.4.2013

This piece “Reception at Ibo Landing” by Laura R. Gadson  is the last in a series of images from a Fiberarts exhibit : “Mermaids and Merwomen in Black Folklore,” celebrating various visual histories and cultures of water goddesses that was held August 28 through October 28, 2012 at the City Gallery at Waterfront Park in Charleston, South Carolina. Displaying over 100 works of art, it was the single largest collection of mermaid-themed quilts and dolls to be housed under one roof. Even more fascinating was that the curator, Torreah “Cookie” Washington and all 66 participating artists from the United States and Canada were African-American.

For more information about “Mermaids and Merwomen in Black Folklore” exhibit, including obtaining the exhibit catalog, contact the curator, Cookie Washington at cookiesews1960@gmail.com

6,29.2013

This piece by Lenora Brown entitled “Oshun" was part of a Fiberarts exhibit : “Mermaids and Merwomen in Black Folklore,” celebrating various visual histories and cultures of water goddesses that was held August 28 through October 28, 2012 at the City Gallery at Waterfront Park in Charleston, South Carolina. Displaying over 100 works of art, it was the single largest collection of mermaid-themed quilts and dolls to be housed under one roof. Even more fascinating was that the curator, Torreah “Cookie” Washington and all 66 participating artists from the United States and Canada were African-American.

For more information about “Mermaids and Merwomen in Black Folklore” exhibit, including obtaining the exhibit catalog, contact the curator, Cookie Washington at cookiesews1960@gmail.com

3.24.2013

This piece by Marion Coleman entitled, “Green Goddess” was part of a Fiberarts exhibit : “Mermaids and Merwomen in Black Folklore,” celebrating various visual histories and cultures of water goddesses that was held August 28 through October 28, 2012 at the City Gallery at Waterfront Park in Charleston, South Carolina. Displaying over 100 works of art, it was the single largest collection of mermaid-themed quilts and dolls to be housed under one roof. Even more fascinating was that the curator, Torreah “Cookie” Washington and all 66 participating artists from the United States and Canada were African-American.
For more information about “Mermaids and Merwomen in Black Folklore” exhibit, including obtaining the exhibit catalog, contact the curator, Cookie Washington at cookiesews1960@gmail.com.

6.26.2013

This piece by Cassandra Harrison entitled “ I am…True Story” was part of a Fiberarts exhibit : “Mermaids and Merwomen in Black Folklore,” celebrating various visual histories and cultures of water goddesses that was held August 28 through October 28, 2012 at the City Gallery at Waterfront Park in Charleston, South Carolina. Displaying over 100 works of art, it was the single largest collection of mermaid-themed quilts and dolls to be housed under one roof. Even more fascinating was that the curator, Torreah “Cookie” Washington and all 66 participating artists from the United States and Canada were African-American.

For more information about “Mermaids and Merwomen in Black Folklore” exhibit, including obtaining the exhibit catalog, contact the curator, Cookie Washington at cookiesews1960@gmail.com