matt-appleton

7

Ra Vincent (Set Decorator): 

“We put emphasis on an Eastern aesthetic, suggesting these Dwarves had travelled far afield in the course of their trading, so everything felt a little bit more foreign than most of what we had seen in Middle-earth up to that point.

Daniel Falconer (Weta Workshop Designer):

“Many of the Dwarf weapons were emblazoned with stylized iconography featuring rams, boars, ravens and other animals with attributes that our designers imagined the Dwarves might revere. There was even a Mûmak, perhaps the Iron Hills harbour a breed of woolly, mammoth-like Mûmakil?

Bob Buck (Costume Designer):

“The soldiers seen battling outside Moria against Azog and his Orcs were significantly more broken down, with less uniformity and a mish-mash of armour parts over leather costumes. Some lacked helmets or chest-plates while others went without pauldrons or greaves. It was all in an effort to show how desperate and bedraggled Thorin’s people had become by this point in the story.

 

Next pages: Thrain’s Costume, Thror’s Costume

Collective tag link: The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug Cloaks and Daggers 

1600px versions: Dropbox repository (updated as I post more pages, might take a few days for new pages to show) 

Notes: These photo excerpts are meant to be used by fans as references for the creation of The Hobbit fanwork (cosplay, art, fiction, nonfiction, etc.) Feel free to repost, use, and edit any of these photographs as you wish. Credit back to me is unnecessary. 

If you found these useful, please consider reading through this post by Obscura and making a donation. 

This wonderful book can be purchased at the following links: via RichardArmitageNet Charity Referral with Amazon [US | UK | DE] | via WETA.

7

Lesley Burkes Harding (Costume Designer, Legolas and Tauriel): 

“With Legolas my philosophy had been to avoid straight lines wherever possible. Rather than cut straight across him, his belt ran off the line of his hips and dipped down at the front.

[…] Like his tunic, the boots Legolas wore were also deerskin, made with a curved lace-up that climbed the muscle of his leg. It caused the boot makers all kinds of trouble because it cut straight through all the lines they would ordinarily follow when making their patterns, but we wouldn’t relent. Once we had embarked on that concept of no straight lines we had to follow through, while ensuring that we were making something that was not just aesthetically pleasing but also practical for Orlando to work in, with good soles.”

Alex Falkner (Weta Workshop Props Model Making Supervisor):

“We must have made 500 arrows for Mirkwood Elves, with a variety of specialized tips. Different squads of Elves had them for different purposes.

Evangeline Lilly:

"I was very concerned about Tauriel’s incredible, long red locks getting in the way of drawing her knives and arrows from her scabbards and quiver. Working together with Weta Workshop’s team we devised brackets that would bring the weapons further around my body than would be traditionally work, so that I could draw them out from the front of my body.

Lesley Burkes Harding:

“Tauriel is a woman of action so I wanted to give her a suitably elegant piece of light Elven armour which wasn’t a corset that some cloistered princess might wear, but a piece of practical clothing for the captain of Thranduil’s Guard.

 

Next pages: Thranduil’s Weapons & Props, Thranduil’s Costumes

Collective tag link: The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug Cloaks and Daggers 

1600px versions: Dropbox repository (updated as I post more pages, might take a few days for new pages to show) 

Notes: These photo excerpts are meant to be used by fans as references for the creation of The Hobbit fanwork (cosplay, art, fiction, nonfiction, etc.) Feel free to repost, use, and edit any of these photographs as you wish. Credit back to me is unnecessary. 

If you found these useful, please consider reading through this post by Obscura and making a donation. 

This wonderful book can be purchased at the following links: via RichardArmitageNet Charity Referral with Amazon [US | UK | DE] | via WETA.

4

Hugo Weaving:

“The armour I wore in The Lord of the Rings looked fantastic, but it was certainly heavier and a slightly different style. This armour, on The Hobbit, is much lighter to wear and it looks terrific as well. I think Matt Appleton has done an incredible job with all of it.

Matt Appleton (Weta Workshop Costume Supervisor):

"I think Kate Venables should take a bow for her fantastic job on the leatherwork. As an armour technician in our team at Weta Workshop she poured her heart and soul into that armour and it showed in the final result. It was a beautiful suit.

Hugo Weaving was a pleasure to work with–so easy-going and positive. We dressed him up in a rich brown suit of armour that was an extrapolation on the suit he wore for The Lord of the Rings, though more comfortable to wear this time around and richer in its level of detail and finish.

Richard Taylor (Weta Workshop Design and Special Effects Supervisor):

“Coming back for The Hobbit Peter wanted to see some of the protectors of this Elven enclave. The chief influence for this new armour was golden High Elf armour worn by the soldiers we saw Elrond leading in battle upon the Gorgoroth plain in The Fellowship of the Ring.

Matt Appleton:

“We had created tassettes that hung all the way down the front, something that was done because we thought they were only going to be standing around looking imposing, but then it turned out they needed to be on horses. Fortunately we solved that one. Somewhere there is a video of me riding a fake horse wearing those tassettes–not just the tassettes, I should add.

 

Next pages: Rivendell Elf Weapons, Saddlery

Collective tag link: The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug Cloaks and Daggers 

1600px versions: Dropbox repository (updated as I post more pages, might take a few days for new pages to show) 

Notes: These photo excerpts are meant to be used by fans as references for the creation of The Hobbit fanwork (cosplay, art, fiction, nonfiction, etc.) Feel free to repost, use, and edit any of these photographs as you wish. Credit back to me is unnecessary. 

If you found these useful, please consider reading through this post by Obscura and making a donation. 

This wonderful book can be purchased at the following links: via RichardArmitageNet Charity Referral with Amazon [US | UK | DE] | via WETA.

6

Bob Buck (Costume Designer): 

“In the final theatrical cut of the film we only saw Beorn in trousers, but a lot of work went into developing a full costume for him which would have been seen in other scenes. When venturing away from the homestead he wore a woollen blanket which had a felted fauna detail border. Beorn’s designs were very much inspired by the Viking aesthetic, which of course sat well with Swedish actor Mikael Persbrandt.

Nadine Jaggi (Weta Workshop Costume Technician):

“We were chasing a kind of foggy, translucent, net-lke quality. Often our approach involved layering different fabrics. On their own they might have a particular shine or glint that was appealing, but they usually looked too much like something fresh off the roll, so we combined things to benefit from their unique properties and make them into something new and less recognizable, that might take on different qualities when it shifted and moved under lights. […] Some of the samples developed were cast directly off giant leaves, with little rivulets of chains stitched along the veins–beautiful and also a little bit creepy.

[…] At some time in the process Eve Gilliland’s amazing leafmaille work became a source of inspiration and that became a new direction to explore. She had made a costume for the World of Wearable Art using tiny brass leaves over chain. It moved beautifully, so a lot of work went into seeing what kind of effects could be achieved with that.”

Alex Falkner (Weta Workshop Props Model Making Supervisor):

"The quiver was also designed in such a way that the dagger sat comfortably in a hollow on one side of it.

Richard Taylor (Weta Workshop Design and Special Effects Supervisor):

“They had carved a hidden kingdom for themselves below the rotting forest and there, safe beneath their stronghold of earth, they conducted their Elven business with all the regal pageantry of a proud imperial society.

 

Next pages: Legolas’s Costume, Legolas’s Weapons, Tauriel’s Weapons, Tauriel’s Costumes

Collective tag link: The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug Cloaks and Daggers 

1600px versions: Dropbox repository (updated as I post more pages, might take a few days for new pages to show) 

Notes: These photo excerpts are meant to be used by fans as references for the creation of The Hobbit fanwork (cosplay, art, fiction, nonfiction, etc.) Feel free to repost, use, and edit any of these photographs as you wish. Credit back to me is unnecessary. 

If you found these useful, please consider reading through this post by Obscura and making a donation. 

This wonderful book can be purchased at the following links: via RichardArmitageNet Charity Referral with Amazon [US | UK | DE] | via WETA.