Game Of Thrones’ Sophie Turner Set For ‘Mary Shelley’s Monster’ Opposite Jeremy Irving, Taissa Farmiga

EXCLUSIVE: In a new take on the life and lore of Frankenstein authoress Mary Shelley, Game of Thrones‘ Sophie Turner (Barely Lethal, Alone) has been cast as Shelley herself opposite Jeremy Irvine (War Horse, Stonewall) as Percy Shelley. Scripted by Deborah Baxtrom, Mary Shelley’s Monster tracks the young writer as she writes her seminal novel and is drawn into a Faustian bargain with her own “monster” of an alter ego, who offers literary fame at a desperate personal cost.Taissa Farmiga (American Horror Story, The Bling Ring) is attached in a supporting role as Mary’s stepsister Claire Clairmont.

The real Shelley first published her Gothic horror classic Frankenstein anonymously at the age of 21 after marrying the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley. Monster envisions her life as “the story of the most extraordinary 19th century teenage heroine told in a visceral, sexy, contemporary way,” per producer Rose Ganguzza, who produced last year’s Beat Generation drama Kill Your Darlings. “Our film is not a period drama. It is a story of youth that transcends time, a gothic romance, a love triangle that involves a dark passenger and we are tremendously excited to have such an exciting cast onboard this wonderful project.”

Director Coky Giedroyc is helming after directing episodes of AMC’s The Killing and Showtime’s Penny Dreadful. Producers are Ganguzza, J Todd Harris (The Kids Are All Right), Damon Lane and Marc Marcum. Filming is slated to begin later this year in the UK and Malta. Turner is repped by CAA and Independent in the UK. Irvine is repped by CAA and Hatton McEwan Penford. Farmiga is repped by ICM Partners and Authentic Talent and Literary Management. Giedroyc is repped by UTA and Independent and Deborah Baxtrom is repped by ICM Partners and Zero Gravity Management.

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The Skull of Frankenstein’s Monster

I love dead… hate living…

Sculpted and hand finished by professional artist Thomas Kuebler, the skull of Frankenstein’s monster was cast in solid resin, chosen for its resemblance to actual human bone. Measuring at around 15 inches from the cranium to the wooden base, no detail was spared in recreating the unmistakable skull of one of horror’s most recognizable monsters. This skull sold at an auction for $1275.00.

After years of working in the corporate art world of toy design prototypes and bringing robots to life in the animatronics field, Thomas Kuebler opted to explore his full creative potential as a multi-media sculptor.  Armed with the tools of his trade, a supportive wife and the odd inhabitants of his own personal fiction, he set forth on a mission to bring the world inside his head to life.

Kuebler’s award-winning silicone character sculptures have exhibited at venues such as The Society of Illustrators, NYC; Galeria Clave, Spain; Copro Nason Gallery, Santa Monica; The Allentown Art Museum, Pennsylvania and The Toledo Museum of Art, Ohio.  Other venues include the offices of DC Comics, Guillermo del Toro’s Bleak House and private collections around the world.  His sculptures have been featured in Spectrum: The Best in Contemporary Fantastic Art, Rue Morgue, and Guillermo del Toro’s Cabinet of Curiosities, among other publications.

Thomas Kuebler, his wife, and their canine counterparts currently reside in North Carolina.

Artist Website

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Tomorrow is the season finale of Showtime’s gooey, gory, incredibly Victorian Gothic-soup show Penny Dreadful, and I’m already pining. For your consideration, a celebratory book list. 

Dracula, by Bram Stoker

The world’s best-known vampire novel essentially encoded the tropes for vampires and Gothic fiction, at least in combination with…

Frankenstein, by Mary Shelley 

Mary Shelley rewrote the rules of literature with Frankenstein. This is one of those books that I still go back to every few years. 

The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, by Alan Moore 

This iconic comic book series employs a large cast of literary characters from the infamous to the esoteric, and pits Victorian heroes against Victorian villains in century and genre spanning shenanigans. 

The Magic Toyshop, by Angela Carter

Angela Carter, master of the whimsical and creepy, gives us orphans, tyrannical guardians, dysfunctional families, and really disturbing puppet shows. 

Fingersmith, by Sarah Waters

Orphan Sue Trindler secures a position with a sheltered gentlewoman and her eccentric guardian as part of a con-game to steal an inheritance, only to find herself pitying—and perhaps falling for—her mark. But Sue is caught up in a plot more devious and much longer in the making than she ever imagined. This is a twisty, almost suffocatingly atmospheric pastiche of Victorian literature.

A Great and Terrible Beauty, by Libba Bray 

Secret societies, corsets, magic, scandals, boarding school, and the fraught and complicated dynamics of teenage friendship. 

Carmilla, by J. Sheridan Le Fanu 

Carmilla predates and clearly influenced Stoker’s Dracula. It’s a short, yummy piece with all the Gothic hallmarks: castles, monsters, maidens, forests, nightmares, seductive and mysterious strangers, and blatant homoeroticism. 

The Monstrumologist, by Rick Yancey

Yancey’s Printz-winning, page-turning horror builds an elaborate world of mythological monsters, midnight adventures, and Dickensian characters in an alternate 19th century America. 

The Picture of Dorian Gray, by Oscar Wilde

Okay, but here’s my question: film and TV versions of Dorian Gray are always sexy, but they’re always dark and smoldering sexy, not the boyish and blond sexy of Wild’s not-so-innocent protagonist, and it’s been more than a century, are we still so dependent on the very visual cues denoting purity and wickedness that Wilde lambasted in his novel? 

Bellefleur, by Joyce Carol Oats 

The Bellefleur clan is a powerful, notorious family, complete with millionaires, psychics, murderers, ghosts, spiritualists, mysteries, and a manor house. This sprawling, twisty novel is a modern classic of the American Gothic. 

Affinity, by Sarah Waters

An upperclass spinster becomes a charitable Lady Visitor at a women’s prison, where she meets a beautiful and charismatic spiritualist. Gothic atmosphere, bottled. 

The Woman In Black, by Susan Hill 

This classic ghost story could have sprung straight from the 19th century English village where it takes place. It’s a short and page-turning read. 

Perfume: The Story of a Murderer, by Patrick Suskind

A perfumer’s apprentice with a refined nose becomes murderously obsessed with the perfect scent. 

Wildthorne, by Jane Eagland 

Told with stark detail and twisting flashbacks, this YA book combines the nightmarish setting of a Victorian madhouse with one teenager’s sexual awakening and fight to preserve her own sense of identity, while figuring out who did this to her. 

Interview with the Vampire, by Anne Rice

Definitely in contention for the English language’s second most read, most referenced, most spoofed vampire novel. (We all know what it’s up against.) 

The Ruby in the Smoke, by Philip Pullman 

Pullman combines all the pulpy tropes and smoky atmosphere of penny dreadfuls with a dose of modern attitude and a cast of characters ferocious and funny and charming and heartbreaking. 

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