manifesta

anonymous asked:

O que fazer pra acreditar em Deus? Eu tento, juro! É tudo que mais quero. Me sinto mal por isso, sinto um vazio aqui dentro mas por mais que eu peça, clame. N consigo sentir sua presença, n sinto q existe "algo" ou alguém me ouvindo. Me ajuda?

Meu bem, olhe para dentro de você, converse com o seu “eu” interior e tente explicar com o entendimento humano sua existência sem a ação de um poder Divino. Agora olhe ao redor e veja a diversidade da fauna e flora. Como tudo isso pode existir sem um comando? Em um momento de medo, solidão e angústia a quem nosso pensamento se remete? Em algum momento como este, certamente você se voltou para o céu em busca de um Ser onipotente para lhe dar consolo e esperança. Houve uma manifestação divina? Não! Mas há muitos relatos de que algo mudou dentro da pessoa, como um sentimento de paz incompreensível, a coragem de agir afastando o medo.  Agora pense na vida sendo gerada dentro do ventre de uma mulher, isso nos faz pensar em como o corpo humano é complexo, e mesmo com toda a tecnologia o homem não é capaz de gerar e fazer crescer a vida mecanicamente, o máximo que se chegou foi à fecundação in vitro, mas sem um útero humano não é possível dar continuidade ao processo. Enfim, eu posso continuar falando várias coisas, mas além da razão existe a fé, e a bíblia diz que sem ela ninguém verá a Deus. Assim como não vemos o ar, mas o sentimos e sabemos que sem ele não podemos viver. Deus não precisa se mostrar para que creiamos Nele, até porque, se ele fizesse isso, a fé seria desnecessária. Então se volte para dentro de si próprio e busque a essência de sua existência e tenho certeza de que encontrará um desejo inexplicável de acreditar na existência de um Pai Criador que nos ama e espera que retornemos a sua presença.

Quero te recomendar livros, filmes e músicas que podem ajudá-lo:

Livro: A noite do cristão morto vivo- Matt Mikalatos (O protagonista desse livro passa pelo mesmo dilema que você, tenta acreditar em Deus, mas não consegue)

Filme: Deus não está morto.

Música: Mesmo sem entender- Thalles Roberto. De Deus- Daniela Araújo. Escrita pelo dedo de Deus- Thalles Roberto. Porto seguro- Daniela Araújo.

Hedwig Fijen, Manifesta  We ask that Manifesta 2014 reconsider St Petersburg as their next location. 

"antigay sentiment has been spreading in Russia’s conservative society, encouraged by the Kremlin and the Russian Orthodox Church. But Mr. Putin and his government have taken that to a new level by legitimizing the hatemongering in legislation. 

Earlier this month, he signed a law banning the adoption of Russian-born children to gay couples and to any couple or single parent living in any country where marriage equality exists. Last month, Mr. Putin signed a law allowing the police to arrest tourists and foreigners suspected of being gay or pro-gay and detain them for up to 14 days. He also signed a bill classifying “homosexual” propaganda as pornography with vague wording that could subject anyone arguing for tolerance or educating children about homosexuality to arrest and fines. 

There is no defense for such actions, which occur against a backdrop of growing violence against gays and could be seen as a license for even more violence. Russia is in danger of moving from pursuing the rule of law to the rule of hate. The new laws contravene Russian commitments to human rights and fundamental freedoms under the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights and Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe.” New York Times. 

It is important that we send a message to the Russian government that such draconian measures will not be tolerated. In particular, the art world community must act now and request that Manifesta is either awarded to a different city, postponed until human rights are restored, or cancelled as a sign of support for the LBGT community. 

We would remind Manifesta “The concept of Manifesta‘s artistic autonomy is clearly acknowledged by the State Hermitage Museum and the City of St. Petersburg. In an artistic project of such high complexity such as Manifesta 10 -­‐ which touches upon different fields of interest and contexts of contemporary life such as urbanity, social discourse, activism and artistic practices -­‐ the ability to find moral, practical and sustainable solutions for unforeseen challenges is of the greatest importance. Manifesta attempts to master this process up to its highest standards.” SIGN THE PETITION HERE

10 Declarations of The Posthumanist Aesthetic

  1. 1. Artists are public intellectuals. Artists are cultural workers who must use their visual talents to affect change.
  2. 2. We must move towards a social dialectical art. This means creating meaningful interactions between and amongst the public to spark interest and engagement in contemporary issues.
  3. 3. Art solely as a commodity is self-serving and a misuse of this powerful medium. Art cannot be only about perpetuating high culture. Public art is a step in the right direction.
  4. 4. Aesthetics are about experience. We, as artists, must create visionary art that leads people to experience a progressive future. Aesthetics is not only about beauty, and art does not have to be created by individual geniuses.
  5. 5. We must never declare the death of easel painting, or the end of art. This is a futile and useless argument that has been proven wrong again and again. Use your energy more wisely and do not get lost in academic arguments that are not geared towards a progressive future.
  6. 6. Create liberatory theory and liberatory content in art. This means discussing the problem and why it exists, while explaining strategies for creating change, and a vision for what that change will look like.[xlii] The creation of meaningful and purposeful works of art also constitutes liberatory practice of theory. Make art that is part of the solution and that does not only reveal problems.
  7. 7. Visual illiteracy must be challenged. We live in a visual world and we can no longer be the passive victims of our misunderstandings of our visual world. The ability to effectively communicate visually is imperative for artists. Artists must engage in outreaches to the public to help people better understand the visual world in which they live.
  8. 8. Artistic responsibility. The critical language of art is important as a specialized form of written communication used to communicate specifically about art. However, artists as public intellectuals must ensure that the educative aspects are integral to works of art circulated in the public sphere. Also, artists must not perpetuate violence or cruelty in their art. Posthumanist artists are role models.
  9. 9. There must be no hierarchy of genre or of mediums. We must celebrate diversity in art and be able to utilize different types for different situations. It does not matter what the art looks like or what materials are used (if it is even object oriented). The fundamental goals for posthumanist art are what ideas are represented and how the art communicates those ideas.
  10. 10. There must be no more myth of genius artists with their individual assertions. Art is about process and communication and therefore is not created in a vacuum! Progressive artists use social dialectical art and participatory practices and collaborative art to engage other people in the process. The exemplars of this are Christo and Jeanne-Claude, who employ thousands of people to help them realize their ephemeral site-specific environmental work. They ensure a clear media message about their art and they make sure that their art is seen by millions of people who might not enter a museum or gallery. Public art can sometimes have a greater connection to life and the lived experiences of the viewers.
Third Wave Manifesta: A Thirteen-Point Agenda

An excerpt from Jennifer Baumgardner and Amy Richards’, Manifesta: Young Women, Feminism and the Future

1. To out unacknowledged feminists, specifically those who are younger, so that Generation X can become a visible movement and, further, a voting block of eighteen to forty-year olds.

2. To safeguard a woman’s right to bear or not to bear a child, regardless of circumstances, including women who are younger than eighteen or impoverished. To preserve the right throughout her life and support the choice to be childless.

3. To make explicit that the fight for reproductive rights must include birth control; the right for poor women and lesbians to have children; partner adoption for gay couples; subsidized fertility treatments for all women who choose them; and freedom from sterilization abuse. Furthermore, to support the idea that sex can be - and usually is - for pleasure, not procreation.

4. To bring down the double standard in sex and sexual health, and foster male responsibility and assertiveness in the following areas: achieving freedom from STDs; more fairly dividing the burden of family planning as well as responsibilities such as child care; and eliminating violence against women.

5. To tap into and raise awareness of our revolutionary history, and the fact that almost all movements began as youth movements. To have access to our intellectual feminist legacy and women’s history; for the classics of radical feminism, womanism, mujeristas, women’s liberation, and all our roots to remain in print; and to have women’s history taught to men as well as women as a part of all curricula. 

6. To support and increase the visibility and power of lesbians and bisexual women in the feminist movement, in high schools, colleges, and the workplace. To recognize that queer women have always been at the forefront of the feminist movement, and that there is nothing to be gained - and much to be lost - by downplaying their history, whether inadvertently or actively.

7. To practice “autokeonony” (“self in community”): to see activism not as a choice between self and community but as a link between them that creates balance.

8. To have equal access to health care, regardless of income, which includes coverage equivalent to men’s and keeping in mind that women use the system more often than men do because of our reproductive capacity.

9. For women who so desire to participate in all reaches of the military, including combat, and to enjoy all the benefits (loans, health care, pensions) offered to its members for as long as we continue to have an active military. The largest expenditure of our national budget goes towards maintaining the welfare system, and feminists have a duty to make sure women have access to every echelon.

10. To liberate adolescents from slut-bashing, listless educators, sexual harassment, and bullying at school, as well as violence in all walks of life, and the silence that hangs over adolescents’ heads, often keeping them isolated, lonely, and indifferent to the world.

11. To make the workplace responsive to an individual’s wants, needs, and talents. This includes valuing (monetarily) stay-at-home parents, aiding employees who want to spend more time with family and continue to work, equalizing pay for jobs of comparable worth, enacting a minimum wage that would bring a full-time worker with two children over the poverty line, and providing employee benefits fro freelance and part-time workers.

12. To acknowledge that, although feminists may have disparate values, we share the same goal of equality, and of supporting one another in our efforts to gain the power to make our own choices.

13. To pass the Equal Rights Amendment so that we can have a constitutional foundation of righteousness and equality upon which future women’s rights conventions will stand. 

The goals of feminism are carried out by everyday women themselves, a point that is often lost on the media. Maybe you aren’t sure you need feminism, or you’re not sure it needs you. You’re sexy, a wallflower, you shop at Calvin Klein, you are a stay-at-home mom, a big Hollywood producer, a beautiful bride in all white, an ex-wife raising three kids, or you shave, pluck AND wax. In reality, feminism wants you to be whoever you are— but with a political consciousness. And vice-versa: you want to be feminist because you want to be exactly who you are.
—  Manifesta:  Young women, feminism, and the future. 

Yes!  Ally and I took a trip to our favorite feminist book store last night and I found the new Ina May Gaskin book!  Birth Matters: A Midwife’s Manifesta was released earlier in March and the first few chapters are so great.  So far, it seems that this book is more geared towards talking about birth, the birth process and the potential for an empowering birth experience framed as a feminist issue.  Also, Ani DiFranco wrote the forward, so how can you wrong there, honestly.  I’ll give a more detailed account when I finish!

Yes, birth books.

The goals of feminism are carried out by everyday women themselves, a point that is often lost on the media. Maybe you aren’t sure you need feminism, or you’re not sure it needs you. You’re sexy, a wallflower, you shop at Calvin Klein, you are a stay-at-home mom, a big Hollywood producer, a beautiful bride all in white, an ex-wife raising three kids, or you shave, pluck, and wax. In reality, feminism wants you to be whoever you are – but with a political consciousness. And vice versa: you want to be a feminist because you want to be exactly who you are.
— 

(56-57, Manifesta)
Baumgardner, Jennifer and Amy Richards. Manifesta: Young Women, Feminism, and the Future. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2000.

Third Wave Manifesta: A Thirteen-Point Agenda

From Jennifer Baumgardner and Amy Richards’,  Manifesta: Young Women, Feminism, and the Future

1. To out unacknowledged feminists, specifically those who are younger, so that Generation X can become a visible movement and, further, a voting block of eighteen to forty-year olds.

2. To safeguard a woman’s right to bear or not to bear a child, regardless of circumstances, including women who are younger than eighteen or impoverished. To preserve the right throughout her life and support the choice to be childless.

3. To make explicit that the fight for reproductive rights must include birth control; the right for poor women and lesbians to have children; partner adoption for gay couples; subsidized fertility treatments for all women who choose them; and freedom from sterilization abuse. Furthermore, to support the idea that sex can be - and usually is - for pleasure, not procreation.

4. To bring down the double standard in sex and sexual health, and foster male responsibility and assertiveness in the following areas: achieving freedom from STDs; more fairly dividing the burden of family planning as well as responsibilities such as child care; and eliminating violence against women.

5. To tap into and raise awareness of our revolutionary history, and the fact that almost all movements began as youth movements. To have access to our intellectual feminist legacy and women’s history; for the classics of radical feminism, womanism, mujeristas, women’s liberation, and all our roots to remain in print; and to have women’s history taught to men as well as women as a part of all curricula. 

6. To support and increase the visibility and power of lesbians and bisexual women in the feminist movement, in high schools, colleges, and the workplace. To recognize that queer women have always been at the forefront of the feminist movement, and that there is nothing to be gained - and much to be lost - by downplaying their history, whether inadvertently or actively.

7. To practice “autokeonony” (“self in community”): to see activism not as a choice between self and community but as a link between them that creates balance.

8. To have equal access to health care, regardless of income, which includes coverage equivalent to men’s and keeping in mind that women use the system more often than men do because of our reproductive capacity.

9. For women who so desire to participate in all reaches of the military, including combat, and to enjoy all the benefits (loans, health care, pensions) offered to its members for as long as we continue to have an active military. The largest expenditure of our national budget goes towards maintaining the welfare system, and feminists have a duty to make sure women have access to every echelon.

10. To liberate adolescents from slut-bashing, listless educators, sexual harassment, and bullying at school, as well as violence in all walks of life, and the silence that hangs over adolescents’ heads, often keeping them isolated, lonely, and indifferent to the world.

11. To make the workplace responsive to an individual’s wants, needs, and talents. This includes valuing (monetarily) stay-at-home parents, aiding employees who want to spend more time with family and continue to work, equalizing pay for jobs of comparable worth, enacting a minimum wage that would bring a full-time worker with two children over the poverty line, and providing employee benefits fro freelance and part-time workers.

12. To acknowledge that, although feminists may have disparate values, we share the same goal of equality, and of supporting one another in our efforts to gain the power to make our own choices.

13. To pass the Equal Rights Amendment so that we can have a constitutional foundation of righteousness and equality upon which future women’s rights conventions will stand.