m42-mount

This is a short pictorial review of the Pentacon 29mm f/2.8 Multi Coated manual lens on the Sony Nex 6 camera.

This is another M42 mount lens which represents incredible value for money if you are prepared to do a little more setup and manual intervention in your photography. You won’t get lots of automatic settings, but you can get some brilliant images if you just apply a little thought and can use the focus ring!

The normal cost for one of these lenses ranges from about £5 to about £40 on ebay, depending on when you buy it and who you buy it from. You will normally pay less for an example bought in an auction rather than with a ‘buy in now’ offer, but I doubt you would pay over that range for a good example.

On a crop sensor camera like the nex the lens is an equivalent focal length of 43.5mm, so a widish standard lens.

I used this lens on my Nex 6 to take some pictures about Stevenage today in Jpeg+Raw mode. Normally I would only shoot in Raw mode, but this gives me the ability to show the ‘out of camera’ performance which may be useful to some people.

From Camera JPeg Pictures

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The camera jpeg images were on the most part slightly over exposed. On most of these shots I had to reduce the exposure by about half a stop when I produced the Lightroom Processed version. Other than that, the images show a tendency for softness in the corners when wide open but this reduces as the aperture is stopped down. The CA seems pretty well controlled and being a prime lens there is little if any distortion.

Once the raw pictures had been processed, there were a few images which I would be happy to use, although this lens is certainly not of the quality of a takumar 28mm f/3.5. As well as adjust the overall exposure, in many cases I reduced the highlights, boosted the contrast and added a bit of midrange definition with the clarity adjustment.

Processed in Lightroom Pictures

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In conclusion this is a reasonable lens which is good value for money if you can find one, as I did, for a few pounds. It is not of the quality of the takumar 28mm f/3.5, but will provide reasonable image quality if you shoot in raw and put a little effort into processing your shots.

Pentacon 29mm f/2.8 lens on Nex This is a short pictorial review of the Pentacon 29mm f/2.8 Multi Coated manual lens on the Sony Nex 6 camera.

This is a post about the latest addition to my vintage camera collection – a Pentax Spotmatic SP1000.

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Spotmatic SP1000

Battery, tripod and file release

Rewind lever and film reminder

Shutter, speed and wind on lever

Film chamber

Exposure meter switch

55mm f/2.0 Lens

Front View

This is a camera which I’ve wanted to own since I was a 12 year old boy and first realised what an iconic SLR the spotmatic was. Although I’ve seen them on ebay uk regularly over the last few years they have either been body only or a complete kit but with a ridiculous price tag. I’d resigned myself to having to buy just a body when I saw one with lens for £20 with no bids. I put a £25 bid on with only a few seconds to go and luckily no one else bid so I got this example for £20.

The camera itself looks to be in very good condition – in fact, looking at some of the body only units for sale on eBay, I think it’s almost immaculate. It also seems sound mechanically. I’ve checked all the speeds and certainly the slower ones seem right and each faster one definitely seems faster than the previous one. The winder works and increments the frame counter and also turns the film advance sprockets in the camera. The battery compartment at the bottom to the camera is empty so I can’t confirm the metering yet, but at least it doesn’t have a battery corroded inside. Each of the other controls certainly seem to do what it is supposed to do or at least turns. The only part where there is any dirt that I can see is around the wind on lever.

Description

The model I have is a simpler, cut down version of the classic spotmatic and was released a few years after the original version. The SP1000 indicates the minimum shutter speed of 1/1000 sec (there was also an SP500 version which went to 1/500 sec) and this version has no self-timer mechanism. It came fitted with a Takumar 55mm f/2.0 lens, which I believe is basically the same design as my 55mm f/1.8 takumar, although this is slightly newer because it’s an SMC Takumar rather than a Super-Multi-Coated Takumar. A somewhat tatty, although original, ever ready case was also supplied which has the really nice Ashai Pentax logo button fitted to it.

The shutter speeds are settable from 1 second to 1/1000sec and the iso film speed is set on the same control by lifting the outer ring and turning it. The Iso range is from 20 to 1600. The lens, which is fitted to the camera with an M42 thread, has f/2.0 to f/16 settings including half stops. As I said above the lens is one of the SMC Takumar series, which was the last series before they became Pentax branded lenses (and K Mount). There are strap lugs fitted to the front corners of the top plate, fitted with triangular strap holders.

There is no hot shoe fitted to the camera, although I’ve seen an accessory cold shoe which allowed you to mount a flash above the camera and wire it to the flash sync sockets on the front of the camera body.

I think it’s the look of the camera that is so appealing; It’s so simple yet somehow just looks right for taking pictures.

In operation this is a simple camera to use. There is a switch on the side of the lens mount which is pushed up to take a meter reading. When you operate this switch the lens is stopped down so it’s possible to adjust the aperture and shutter speed to get the exposure right. The correct sequence to take a picture would be

  1. Wind the film on to an unexposed frame.
  2. Compose the shot through the viewfinder. The view will be nice and bright because the aperture will be fully open
  3. Focus the picture on the subject.
  4. Push the switch to the up position – the lens will stop down to whatever aperture it is set to
  5. Set the aperture / shutter speed combination to whatever settings you want. The correct combination will centre the exposure meter needle in the display which is off to the right of the viewfinder
  6. Press the shutter to expose the picture – the viewfinder will go bright again after the exposure as the exposure switch will drop to it’s down position
  7. Repeat as required.

Once you have done this a few times the sound of the shutter is also really appealing. It’s much more solid and purposeful than a lot of cameras and certainly makes my K5 sound mushy in comparison.

Nice Features

  • When you wind on the film, a small dot next to the wind on lever goes red.
  • Underneath the rewind lever there is a small dial which is used to remind the user the type of film in the camera
  • There is no split level focusing screen but there is a small fresnel circle in the centre of the screen
  • The exposure counter has the 20 and 36 positions marked in red.

Pictures

This is one of the film cameras which I will run a film through – once I get some developed film back I’ll post the images.

 

Vintage camera collection – Pentax spotmatic SP1000 This is a post about the latest addition to my vintage camera collection - a Pentax Spotmatic SP1000.

#throwback #thursday #TBT to April #2011 Ollie Keiderling Nosegrind at Aston Clinton - #shot on #Kodak #35mm #film in #Canon #eos #5000 with a #M42 mount 135mm f2.8 Prime - #skateboarding #skatepark #skateboarder #skateeverydamnday #backintheday #skatelife #instaskate #metrogrammed #lookbook #thrasher #ff #nike #nikesb #bokeh #style #hiphop (at Aston Clinton Skatepark)

This is a review of the vintage m42 Auto Optomax 200mm f/3.5 telephoto lens when used on a Sony Nex 6 mirrorless camera.

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Optomax 200mm f/3.5

Front view

Optomax 200mm f/3.5

This was another cheap lens which I picked up from EBay UK a few weeks ago. It’s a fixed focal length 200mm telephoto lens with a maximum aperture of f3.5 and a minimum aperture of f/22. The aperture is made of 6 blades so any bokeh will be less than perfectly circular. I found a technical description of the lens on the M42 lens data site, and discovered that there have been a few variation of the lens. I bought it because after I saw it on ebay, I did a quick search on flickr for some sample images and was quite impressed with the results.

The lens actually took a long time to turn up because it was on a 5 day delivery and then the courier managed to loose it! Fortunately the seller was very good and after some searching in the couriers premises it was found and arrived about a week later.

This is a simple lens to use. There is simply an aperture ring and a focus ring to adjust and an Auto/Manual switch (although on my Nex I simply leave this set to Manual so the lens stops down as I adjust the aperture ring). The aperture ring clicks on full stops only – there are no half stops. The focus ring is smooth and well damped and focuses easily over it’s useable range which is about 3.5M to infinity.

There were a few small specs of dust inside the lens but no more than is usual for an M42 lens which must have been made about the mid 1970′s.

Performance

I have to say that the performance of this lens leaves a lot to be desired. Although it improves as the lens stops down it’s hardly stellar and even though it was a cheap lens (about £16) I would say there are probably better lenses for a similar price. The images look soft wide open and lack contrast. Of course it could be my particular example – the images I saw on flickr for this lens were significantly better than any I’ve obtained

The pictures below were taken in my garden at the different apertures the lens offers and were actually about the best of any of the images I took.

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f/3.5

f/4.0

f/5.6

f/8.0

f/11

f/16

f/22
Auto Optomax telephoto lens on Sony Nex 6 This is a review of the vintage m42 Auto Optomax 200mm f/3.5 telephoto lens when used on a Sony Nex 6 mirrorless camera.

#throwback #thursday #TBT to #July #2011 - Louis Francis with #nollie of Gap in #highwycombe #wycombe #shot on #Agfa #35mm #film in #Canon #EOS #5000 with a #M42 mount Tosner 135mm f2.8 #Prime - #skateboarding #skatepark #skateboarder #skateeverydamnday #backintheday #skatelife #instaskate #summer #metrogrammed #filmisnotdead #Street #streetphotography #buyfilmnotmegapixels #thrasher #ff (at High Wycombe)