3

http://hetalia.livejournal.com/12658309.html

http://www.spreewald-info.de/pl/land_leute/braeuche/trachten/index.php

NO BUT PAY ATTENTION

SHE COULD BE LUSATIA

LOOK AT THE COSTUME, IT IS THE NEAREST FIT I COULD FIND AFTER HOURS OF SEARCHING

"A child who’s like Belarus’ sister.
I will rework this.”

The one problem in my theory is that the only thing I can find of them being close is that both languages are labeled as “endangered.”

STILL

Bertsdorf-Hörnitz, the village of flowers in the Zittau Mountains! *** Bertsdorf-Hörnitz, das Blumendorf im Zittauer Gebirge! by pinguin1961 on Flickr.

9

Castle of Lübben (Sorbian: Lubin) and Neuhaus manor in Steinkirchen, Dahme-Spreewald district, Brandenburg

Lübben / Lubin has always been the center of Lusatia, a region in south-eastern Brandenburg and north-eastern saxony at the border to poland that still retains its slavonic cultural heritage, including the Sorbian language that is spoken in two varieties.

The representative castle from 1561 as we see it today replaces an older moated and fortified castle from the 12th century on an island between two arms of the river Spree. The current color scheme of the façade is the result of an extensive renovation between 1899 and 1917.

The castle is a complex of buildings that originate from different times and featuring different styles. The tower is probably the only remaining original building from the 12th century. The government building with the ornamented gable was built between 1679 and 1682 in late renaissance style. It used to be home to the administration of the government of Lusatia. The horse stable is from 1669.

Today, the castle houses the Lusatian museum, a cafe, and the tourist information.

Neuhaus manor was built in 1801 in biedermeier style, replacing an older manor house. Writer and dramatist Ernst Christoph Freiherr von Houwald lived there from 1822 until his death in 1845. The property remained in possession of the family von Houwald until 1945, when they were expropriated.

The building served first as a shelter for refugees from the formerly eastern German territories and for citizens of Lübben whose homes were destroyed during world war II. Later, it was home to the school of Steinkirchen, now a district of Lübben. The dangerously dilapidated state of the building caused by decades of neglected maintenance forced the school to move out in 1986. The planned demolition did not take place due to lack of financial resources.

Immediately after the German reunion in 1990, measures were taken to preserve the near-ruinous house. Six years later, the restoration was completed, and the home was opened in the presence of its former owner Götz von Houwald. The building houses a public music school, two apartments, and the regional office of the Spreewald club. Frequently, concerts and exhibitions take place.

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