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Kara Walker on her “uneasy relationship” with her imagination.
day 342

Watched the Junot Diaz + Toni Morrison conversation*. Zomg loved it. As part of my obsessive habit of word collecting, I wrote down a bunch of quotes/paraphrases/notes, which I’ll share with you here and count as my #createdaily. ps. spoilers. 

"You don’t have to write by default to a white audience." -JD

"We became …people who didn’t live in the neighborhood, but we behaved that way.”-TM

"If you’d only written that we could go home and smoke it."-JD, re: In the Dark

"Mentioning white supremacy exists is a way to gurantee that you have no friends, it seems." -JD

Make your ghosts more ghosts by making everything else accurate - paraphrased from JD

"The rest of it was me not trying to write for the oppressor…if he’s sitting on my shoulder, judging it… that’s not free. That’s someone else’s story." -TM

"All my books are banned." -TM

"It might invite a prison riot." -reason from a prison warden on why one of TM’s books were banned.

Karen Russell’s Sleep Donation (out Mar. 25) will explore a future America in which an insomnia epidemic is affecting hundreds of thousands of people. Enter the Slumber Corps, an organization that urges healthy dreamers to donate sleep to an insomniac. Under the wealthy and enigmatic Storch brothers the Corps’ reach has grown, with outposts in every major US city. Trish Edgewater, whose sister Dori was one of the first victims of the lethal insomnia, has spent the past seven years recruiting for the Corps. But Trish’s faith in the organization and in her own motives begins to falter when she is confronted by “Baby A,” the first universal sleep donor, and the mysterious “Donor Y.”

Karen Russell joins #LIVENYPL on Tuesday, June 3, 2014 - join us for an energizing discussion: http://www.nypl.org/events/programs/2014/06/03/rivka-galchen-karen-russell-0?nref=56896

The same constraints to writing well are also constraints to living fully. Not to be a slave to fashion or commerce, not to succumb to arid self-censorship, not to bow to popular opinion—what is all that but a description of the educated, enlightened life?

Jeffrey Eugenides will be talking to Karl Ove Knausgaard on June 6th.  You can purchase tickets here.

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"The biggest thing that’s in a movie is the main thing is these faces and these voices, these people who are playing the scenes and as prepared as I may have a scene be, I feel like on a set it’s always just chaos and the actors take over and they have to bring it to life and you know it just goes to them."

- Wes Anderson speaking about his new film, The Grand Budapest Hotel, last week at LIVE from the NYPL.  The film hits theaters today.

 

Mr Knausgaard is the author of one of the most idiosyncratic literary works of recent years: a six-volume, 3,500-page autobiography called “My Struggle”, after Hitler’s “Mein Kampf”. It starts with a portrait of his father’s alcohol-soaked death, ends with a meditation on Hitler and takes the author through the cycle of his life. Mr Knausgaard is now 45.

Watch The New York Public Library’s Geoff Dyer | LIVE from the NYPL on Livestream.com. A writer whose work defies easy categorization, Geoff Dyer recounts tales from Another Great Day at Sea, his new book on the complexities of life on board a U.S. aircraft carrier. Geoff Dyer is the author of four novels: Paris Trance, The Search, The Colour of Memory, and, most recently, Jeff in Venice, Death in Varanasi; a critical study of John Berger, Ways of Telling; five genre-defying titles: But Beautiful, The Missing of the Somme, Out of Sheer Rage, Yoga For People Who Can’t Be Bothered To Do It, and The Ongoing Moment. His collection of essays, Otherwise Known as the Human Condition, won a National Book Critics Circle Award in 2012. He is also the editor of John Berger: Selected Essays and co-editor, with Margaret Sartor, of What Was True: The Photographs and Notebooks of William Gedney. A new book, Another Great Day at Sea, about life aboard the USS George H W Bush, will be published in May. In 2003 he was a recipient of a Lannan Literary Fellowship; in 2005 he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature; in 2006 he received the E. M. Forster Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters; in 2009 he was the recipient of the Bollinger Everyman Wodehouse Prize for Best Comic Novel and the GQ Writer of the Year Award (for Jeff in Venice Death in Varanasi).

Geoff Dyer closes out our season tonight!  Here’s the Livestream link.  See you there!

I think the last time I had a Budweiser I was at a Mets game, and it was a long, quite a while ago, and when I bought it my daughter Lily was sitting next to me and she said, ‘Dad, you’re drinking a Budweiser?’ And I took a sip of it and I got the hiccoughs. I couldn’t finish the thing.
—  Brooklyn Brewery founder, Steve Hindy, on the last time he drank a Budweiser.  Until we served him one later in the evening…
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"My impetus for writing was because I didn’t want to drink by myself"  - Chuck Palahniuk 

Chuck spoke with Douglas Coupland on April 25th.  Check out the highlights to hear about their writing methods!

Is it too late to prepare for climate change?

Upcoming #LIVENYPL guest Elizabeth Kolbert, a staff writer for the New Yorker, recently examined the prospects of preparing for climate change:

"Promoting ‘preparedness’ is doubtless a good idea. As the executive order notes, climate impacts—which include, but are not limited to, heat waves, heavier downpours, and an increase in the number and intensity of wildfires—are ‘already affecting communities, natural resources, ecosystems, economies, and public health across the Nation.’ However, one of the dangers of this enterprise is that it tends to presuppose, in a Boy Scout-ish sort of way, that “preparedness” is possible."

Read the article here.

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