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8 Quotes From Banned Books | Epic Reads
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High School Reading List

Back in May, the #weneeddiversebooks campaign lit a fire to fulfill the desperate need for diverse books in children’s literature. Behind the Book has always championed efforts to find diverse authors and protagonists that will appeal to students since we serve communities of color. For your enjoyment (and enrichment), we’ve created an epic list of diverse books to reflect the diversity in our city; here’s our list for high school students.

Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Drown by Junot Diaz

Kindred by Octavia E. Butler

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie

The Chaos by Nalo Hopkinson

Akata Witch by Nnedi Okorafor

The Living by Matt De La Peña, a Behind the Book author

The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms by N.K. Jemisin

The Pearl that Broke Its Shell: a Novel by Nadia Hashimi

Mare’s War by Tanita S. Davis

A Teaspoon of Earth and Sea by Dina Nayeri

The Book of Unknown Americans: a Novel by Cristina Henríquez

A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier by Ishmael Beah

Silver People: Voices from the Panama Canal by Margarita Engle

Naughts & Crosses by Malorie Blackman

The Icarus Girl by Helen Oyeyemi

For descriptions, click the read more!

(Click the following links to be directed to the Kindergarten, (early) Elementary and Middle Grade lists)

Read More

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september 8 is international literacy day. globally, two thirds of the 775,000,000 illiterate adults, and 63% of the 126 million illiterate youth, are female. the discrepancy is a result of 33,000,000 fewer girls attending primary school than boys. but any child born to a literate mother is twice as likely to be immunized and live past the age of five, and is also twice as likely to receive an education. (sources here)

photos by (click pic) joey l. at a school for hamar girls in labaltoy, ethiopia; muhammed muheisen in pakistan; altaf gadri at an unofficial school run for slum dwellers held under a bridge in new delhi; paula bronstein at a thai refugee camp for burmese refugees; reuters, from a school in bori bana, a slum in abidjan, ivory coast; zohra bensemra from a school at a refugee camp in islamabad; anja niedringhaus at a makeshift school in budyali, afghanistan; kate holt in makuyuni, tanzania; reuters, from a school in islamabad; and lana slezic from a bombed out school in afghanistan. 

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September 8 was proclaimed International Literacy Day by UNESCO on November 17, 1965. It was first celebrated in 1966. Its aim is to highlight the importance of literacy to individuals, communities and societies. On International Literacy Day each year, UNESCO reminds the international community of the status of literacy and adult learning globally. Celebrations take place around the world.

Some 775 million adults lack minimum literacy skills; one in five adults is still not literate and two-thirds of them are women; 60.7 million children are out-of-school and many more attend irregularly or drop out. Read More || Edit || Quote by me.

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